• Previous theoretical studies on the interaction of excitatory and inhibitory neurons proposed to model this cortical microcircuit motif as a so-called Winner-Take-All (WTA) circuit. A recent modeling study however found that the WTA model is not adequate for data-based softer forms of divisive inhibition as found in a microcircuit motif in cortical layer 2/3. We investigate here through theoretical analysis the role of such softer divisive inhibition for the emergence of computational operations and neural codes under spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP). We show that in contrast to WTA models - where the network activity has been interpreted as probabilistic inference in a generative mixture distribution - this network dynamics approximates inference in a noisy-OR-like generative model that explains the network input based on multiple hidden causes. Furthermore, we show that STDP optimizes the parameters of this model by approximating online the expectation maximization (EM) algorithm. This theoretical analysis corroborates a preceding modelling study which suggested that the learning dynamics of this layer 2/3 microcircuit motif extracts a specific modular representation of the input and thus performs blind source separation on the input statistics.
  • Cortical microcircuits are very complex networks, but they are composed of a relatively small number of stereotypical motifs. Hence one strategy for throwing light on the computational function of cortical microcircuits is to analyze emergent computational properties of these stereotypical microcircuit motifs. We are addressing here the question how spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) shapes the computational properties of one motif that has frequently been studied experimentally: interconnected populations of pyramidal cells and parvalbumin-positive inhibitory cells in layer 2/3. Experimental studies suggest that these inhibitory neurons exert some form of divisive inhibition on the pyramidal cells. We show that this data-based form of feedback inhibition, which is softer than that of winner-take-all models that are commonly considered in theoretical analyses, contributes to the emergence of an important computational function through STDP: The capability to disentangle superimposed firing patterns in upstream networks, and to represent their information content through a sparse assembly code.
  • Network of neurons in the brain apply - unlike processors in our current generation of computer hardware - an event-based processing strategy, where short pulses (spikes) are emitted sparsely by neurons to signal the occurrence of an event at a particular point in time. Such spike-based computations promise to be substantially more power-efficient than traditional clocked processing schemes. However it turned out to be surprisingly difficult to design networks of spiking neurons that are able to carry out demanding computations. We present here a new theoretical framework for organizing computations of networks of spiking neurons. In particular, we show that a suitable design enables them to solve hard constraint satisfaction problems from the domains of planning - optimization and verification - logical inference. The underlying design principles employ noise as a computational resource. Nevertheless the timing of spikes (rather than just spike rates) plays an essential role in the resulting computations. Furthermore, one can demonstrate for the Traveling Salesman Problem a surprising computational advantage of networks of spiking neurons compared with traditional artificial neural networks and Gibbs sampling. The identification of such advantage has been a well-known open problem.