• Eclipsing binaries are vital for directly determining stellar parameters without reliance on models or scaling relations. Spectroscopically derived parameters of detached and semi-detached binaries allow us to determine component masses that can inform theories of stellar and binary evolution. Here we present moderate resolution ground-based spectra of stars in close binary systems with and without (detected) tertiary companions observed by NASA's Kepler mission and analyzed for eclipse timing variations. We obtain radial velocities and spectroscopic orbits for five single-lined and 35 double-lined systems, and confirm one false positive eclipsing binary. For the double-lined spectroscopic binaries we also determine individual component masses and examine the mass ratio M_2/M_1 distribution, which is dominated by binaries with like-mass pairs and semi-detached classical Algol systems that have undergone mass transfer. Finally, we constrain the mass of the tertiary component for five double-lined binaries with previously detected companions.
  • Recent progress has been made in using attention based encoder-decoder framework for video captioning. However, most existing decoders apply the attention mechanism to every generated word including both visual words (e.g., "gun" and "shooting") and non-visual words (e.g. "the", "a"). However, these non-visual words can be easily predicted using natural language model without considering visual signals or attention. Imposing attention mechanism on non-visual words could mislead and decrease the overall performance of video captioning. To address this issue, we propose a hierarchical LSTM with adjusted temporal attention (hLSTMat) approach for video captioning. Specifically, the proposed framework utilizes the temporal attention for selecting specific frames to predict the related words, while the adjusted temporal attention is for deciding whether to depend on the visual information or the language context information. Also, a hierarchical LSTMs is designed to simultaneously consider both low-level visual information and high-level language context information to support the video caption generation. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed framework, we test our method on two prevalent datasets: MSVD and MSR-VTT, and experimental results show that our approach outperforms the state-of-the-art methods on both two datasets.
  • We report the discovery of a post-mass transfer Gamma Doradus/Delta Scuti hybrid pulsator in the eclipsing binary KIC~9592855. This binary has a circular orbit, an orbital period of 1.2 days, and contains two stars of almost identical masses ($M_1=1.72M_{\odot}, M_2=1.71M_{\odot}$). However, the cooler secondary star is more evolved ($R_2=1.96R_{\odot}$) while the hotter primary is still on the zero-age-main-sequence ($R_1=1.53R_{\odot}$). Coeval models from single star evolution cannot explain the observed masses and radii, and binary evolution with mass-transfer needs to be invoked. After subtracting the binary light curve, the Fourier spectrum shows low-order pressure-mode pulsations, and more dominantly, a cluster of low-frequency gravity modes at about $2$ day$^{-1}$. These g-modes are nearly equally-spaced in period, and the period spacing pattern has a negative slope. We identify these g-modes as prograde dipole modes and find that they stem from the secondary star. The frequency range of unstable p-modes also agrees with that of the secondary. We derive the internal rotation rate of the convective core and the asymptotic period spacing from the observed g-modes. The resulting values suggest that the core and envelope rotate nearly uniformly, i.e., their rotation rates are both similar to the orbital frequency of this synchronized binary.
  • KIC~8262223 is an eclipsing binary with a short orbital period ($P=1.61$ d). The {\it Kepler} light curves are of Algol-type and display deep and partial eclipses, ellipsoidal variations, and pulsations of Delta Scuti type. We analyzed the {\it Kepler} photometric data, complemented by phase-resolved spectra from the R-C Spectrograph on the 4-meter Mayall telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory and determined the fundamental parameters of this system. The low mass and oversized secondary ($M_2=0.20M_{\odot}$, $R_2=1.31R_{\odot}$) is the remnant of the donor star that transferred most of its mass to the gainer, and now the primary star. The current primary star is thus not a normal $\delta$ Scuti star but the result of mass accretion from a lower mass progenitor. We discuss the possible evolutionary history and demonstrate with the MESA evolution code that the system can be understood as the result of non-conservative binary evolution similar to that for the formation of EL CVn type binaries. The pulsations of the primary star can be explained as radial and non-radial pressure modes. The equilibrium models from single star evolutionary tracks can match the observed mass and radius ($M_1=1.94M_{\odot}$, $R_1=1.67R_{\odot}$) but the predicted unstable modes associated with these models differ somewhat from those observed. This work presents a preliminary asteroseismic analysis of the abnormal Delta Scuti pulsators, and we discuss the need for better theoretical understanding of such pulsating mass gaining stars.
  • KIC 3230227 is a short period ($P\approx 7.0$ days) eclipsing binary with a very eccentric orbit ($e=0.6$). From combined analysis of radial velocities and {\it Kepler} light curves, this system is found to be composed of two A-type stars, with masses of $M_1=1.84\pm 0.18M_{\odot}$, $M_2=1.73\pm 0.17M_{\odot}$ and radii of $R_1=2.01\pm 0.09R_{\odot}$, $R_2=1.68\pm 0.08 R_{\odot}$ for the primary and secondary, respectively. In addition to an eclipse, the binary light curve shows a brightening and dimming near periastron, making this a somewhat rare eclipsing heartbeat star system. After removing the binary light curve model, more than ten pulsational frequencies are present in the Fourier spectrum of the residuals, and most of them are integer multiples of the orbital frequency. These pulsations are tidally driven, and both the amplitudes and phases are in agreement with predictions from linear tidal theory for $l=2, m=-2$ prograde modes.
  • We present a photometric and light curve analysis of an eccentric eclipsing binary in the K2 Campaign 0 field that resides in Sh 2-252E, a young star cluster embedded in an H II region. We describe a spectroscopic investigation of the three brightest stars in the crowded aperture to identify which is the binary system. We find that none of these stars are components of the eclipsing binary system, which must be one of the fainter nearby stars. These bright cluster members all have remarkable spectra: Sh 2-252a (EPIC 202062176) is a B0.5 V star with razor sharp absorption lines, Sh 2-252b is a Herbig A0 star with disk-like emission lines, and Sh 2-252c is a pre-main sequence star with very red color.
  • KIC 9851944 is a short period ($P=2.16$ days) eclipsing binary in the {\it Kepler} field of view. By combining the analysis of {\it Kepler} photometry and phase resolved spectra from Kitt Peak National Observatory and Lowell Observatory, we determine the atmospheric and physical parameters of both stars. The two components have very different radii ($2.27R_{\odot}$, $3.19R_{\odot}$) but close masses ($1.76 M_{\odot}$, $1.79M_{\odot}$) and effective temperatures ($7026$K, $6902$K), indicating different evolutionary stages. The hotter primary is still on the main sequence (MS), while the cooler and larger secondary star has evolved to post-MS, burning hydrogen in a shell. A comparison with coeval evolutionary models shows that it requires solar metallicity and a higher mass ratio to fit the radii and temperatures of both stars simultaneously. Both components show $\delta$ Scuti type pulsations which we interpret as p-modes and p and g mixed modes. After a close examination of the evolution of $\delta$ Scuti pulsational frequencies, we make a comparison of the observed frequencies with those calculated from MESA/GYRE.
  • Eclipsing binaries serve as a valuable source of stellar masses and radii that inform stellar evolutionary models and provide insight into additional astrophysical processes. The exquisite light curves generated by space-based missions such as Kepler offer the most stringent tests to date. We use the Kepler light curve of the 4.8-day eclipsing binary KIC 5739896 with ground based optical spectra to derive fundamental parameters for the system. We reconstruct the component spectra to determine the individual atmospheric parameters, and model the Kepler photometry with the binary synthesis code ELC to obtain accurate masses and radii. The two components of KIC 5738698 are F-type stars with M1 = 1.39+/-0.04M, M2 = 1.34+/-0.06M, and R1 = 1.84+/-0.03R, R2 = 1.72+/-0.03R. We also report a small eccentricity (e < 0.0017) and unusual albedo values that are required to match the detailed shape of the Kepler light curve. Comparisons with evolutionary models indicate an approximate age of 2.3 Gyr for the system.
  • KOI-81 is a totally eclipsing binary discovered by the Kepler mission that consists of a rapidly rotating B-type star and a small, hot companion. The system was forged through large scale mass transfer that stripped the mass donor of its envelope and spun up the mass gainer star. We present an analysis of UV spectra of KOI-81 that were obtained with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope that reveal for the first time the spectral features of the faint, hot companion. We present a double-lined spectroscopic orbit for the system that yields mass estimates of 2.92 M_sun and 0.19 M_sun for the B-star and hot subdwarf, respectively. We used a Doppler tomography algorithm to reconstruct the UV spectra of the components, and a comparison of the reconstructed and model spectra yields effective temperatures of 12 kK and 19 - 27 kK for the B-star and hot companion, respectively. The B-star is pulsating, and we identified a number of peaks in the Fourier transform of the light curve, including one that may indicate an equatorial rotation period of 11.5~hours. The B-star has an equatorial velocity that is 74% of the critical velocity where centrifugal and gravitational accelerations balance at the equator, and we fit the transit light curve by calculating a rotationally distorted model for the photosphere of the B-star.
  • We present revised properties for 196,468 stars observed by the NASA Kepler Mission and used in the analysis of Quarter 1-16 (Q1-Q16) data to detect and characterize transiting exoplanets. The catalog is based on a compilation of literature values for atmospheric properties (temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity) derived from different observational techniques (photometry, spectroscopy, asteroseismology, and exoplanet transits), which were then homogeneously fitted to a grid of Dartmouth stellar isochrones. We use broadband photometry and asteroseismology to characterize 11,532 Kepler targets which were previously unclassified in the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). We report the detection of oscillations in 2,762 of these targets, classifying them as giant stars and increasing the number of known oscillating giant stars observed by Kepler by ~20% to a total of ~15,500 stars. Typical uncertainties in derived radii and masses are ~40% and ~20%, respectively, for stars with photometric constraints only, and 5-15% and ~10% for stars based on spectroscopy and/or asteroseismology, although these uncertainties vary strongly with spectral type and luminosity class. A comparison with the Q1-Q12 catalog shows a systematic decrease in radii for M dwarfs, while radii for K dwarfs decrease or increase depending on the Q1-Q12 provenance (KIC or Yonsei-Yale isochrones). Radii of F-G dwarfs are on average unchanged, with the exception of newly identified giants. The Q1-Q16 star properties catalog is a first step towards an improved characterization of all Kepler targets to support planet occurrence studies.
  • KIC 9406652 is a remarkable variable star in the Kepler field of view that shows both very rapid oscillations and long term outbursts in its light curve. We present an analysis of the light curve over quarters 1 to 15 and new spectroscopy that indicates that the object is a cataclysmic variable with an orbital period of 6.108 hours. However, an even stronger signal appears in the light curve periodogram for a shorter period of 5.753 hours, and we argue that this corresponds to the modulation of flux from the hot spot region in a tilted, precessing disk surrounding the white dwarf star. We present a preliminary orbital solution from radial velocity measurements of features from the accretion disk and the photosphere of the companion. We use a Doppler tomography algorithm to reconstruct the disk and companion spectra, and we also consider how these components contribute to the object's spectral energy distribution from ultraviolet to infrared wavelengths. This target offers us a remarkable opportunity to investigate disk processes during the high mass transfer stage of evolution in cataclysmic variables.