• We consider the estimation and inference of graphical models that characterize the dependency structure of high-dimensional tensor-valued data. To facilitate the estimation of the precision matrix corresponding to each way of the tensor, we assume the data follow a tensor normal distribution whose covariance has a Kronecker product structure. A critical challenge in the estimation and inference of this model is the fact that its penalized maximum likelihood estimation involves minimizing a non-convex objective function. To address it, this paper makes two contributions: (i) In spite of the non-convexity of this estimation problem, we prove that an alternating minimization algorithm, which iteratively estimates each sparse precision matrix while fixing the others, attains an estimator with an optimal statistical rate of convergence. (ii) We propose a de-biased statistical inference procedure for testing hypotheses on the true support of the sparse precision matrices, and employ it for testing a growing number of hypothesis with false discovery rate (FDR) control. The asymptotic normality of our test statistic and the consistency of FDR control procedure are established. Our theoretical results are backed up by thorough numerical studies and our real applications on neuroimaging studies of Autism spectrum disorder and users' advertising click analysis bring new scientific findings and business insights. The proposed methods are encoded into a publicly available R package Tlasso.
  • Sparse generalized eigenvalue problem (GEP) plays a pivotal role in a large family of high-dimensional statistical models, including sparse Fisher's discriminant analysis, canonical correlation analysis, and sufficient dimension reduction. Sparse GEP involves solving a non-convex optimization problem. Most existing methods and theory in the context of specific statistical models that are special cases of the sparse GEP require restrictive structural assumptions on the input matrices. In this paper, we propose a two-stage computational framework to solve the sparse GEP. At the first stage, we solve a convex relaxation of the sparse GEP. Taking the solution as an initial value, we then exploit a nonconvex optimization perspective and propose the truncated Rayleigh flow method (Rifle) to estimate the leading generalized eigenvector. We show that Rifle converges linearly to a solution with the optimal statistical rate of convergence for many statistical models. Theoretically, our method significantly improves upon the existing literature by eliminating structural assumptions on the input matrices for both stages. To achieve this, our analysis involves two key ingredients: (i) a new analysis of the gradient based method on nonconvex objective functions, and (ii) a fine-grained characterization of the evolution of sparsity patterns along the solution path. Thorough numerical studies are provided to validate the theoretical results.
  • We propose a nonparametric method for detecting nonlinear causal relationship within a set of multidimensional discrete time series, by using sparse additive models (SpAMs). We show that, when the input to the SpAM is a $\beta$-mixing time series, the model can be fitted by first approximating each unknown function with a linear combination of a set of B-spline bases, and then solving a group-lasso-type optimization problem with nonconvex regularization. Theoretically, we characterize the oracle statistical properties of the proposed sparse estimator in function estimation and model selection. Numerically, we propose an efficient pathwise iterative shrinkage thresholding algorithm (PISTA), which tames the nonconvexity and guarantees linear convergence towards the desired sparse estimator with high probability.
  • We study the problem of recovery of matrices that are simultaneously low rank and row and/or column sparse. Such matrices appear in recent applications in cognitive neuroscience, imaging, computer vision, macroeconomics, and genetics. We propose a GDT (Gradient Descent with hard Thresholding) algorithm to efficiently recover matrices with such structure, by minimizing a bi-convex function over a nonconvex set of constraints. We show linear convergence of the iterates obtained by GDT to a region within statistical error of an optimal solution. As an application of our method, we consider multi-task learning problems and show that the statistical error rate obtained by GDT is near optimal compared to minimax rate. Experiments demonstrate competitive performance and much faster running speed compared to existing methods, on both simulations and real data sets.
  • We propose a general theory for studying the \xl{landscape} of nonconvex \xl{optimization} with underlying symmetric structures \tz{for a class of machine learning problems (e.g., low-rank matrix factorization, phase retrieval, and deep linear neural networks)}. In specific, we characterize the locations of stationary points and the null space of Hessian matrices \xl{of the objective function} via the lens of invariant groups\removed{for associated optimization problems, including low-rank matrix factorization, phase retrieval, and deep linear neural networks}. As a major motivating example, we apply the proposed general theory to characterize the global \xl{landscape} of the \xl{nonconvex optimization in} low-rank matrix factorization problem. In particular, we illustrate how the rotational symmetry group gives rise to infinitely many nonisolated strict saddle points and equivalent global minima of the objective function. By explicitly identifying all stationary points, we divide the entire parameter space into three regions: ($\cR_1$) the region containing the neighborhoods of all strict saddle points, where the objective has negative curvatures; ($\cR_2$) the region containing neighborhoods of all global minima, where the objective enjoys strong convexity along certain directions; and ($\cR_3$) the complement of the above regions, where the gradient has sufficiently large magnitudes. We further extend our result to the matrix sensing problem. Such global landscape implies strong global convergence guarantees for popular iterative algorithms with arbitrary initial solutions.
  • We study a stochastic and distributed algorithm for nonconvex problems whose objective consists of a sum of $N$ nonconvex $L_i/N$-smooth functions, plus a nonsmooth regularizer. The proposed NonconvEx primal-dual SpliTTing (NESTT) algorithm splits the problem into $N$ subproblems, and utilizes an augmented Lagrangian based primal-dual scheme to solve it in a distributed and stochastic manner. With a special non-uniform sampling, a version of NESTT achieves $\epsilon$-stationary solution using $\mathcal{O}((\sum_{i=1}^N\sqrt{L_i/N})^2/\epsilon)$ gradient evaluations, which can be up to $\mathcal{O}(N)$ times better than the (proximal) gradient descent methods. It also achieves Q-linear convergence rate for nonconvex $\ell_1$ penalized quadratic problems with polyhedral constraints. Further, we reveal a fundamental connection between primal-dual based methods and a few primal only methods such as IAG/SAG/SAGA.
  • We study the fundamental tradeoffs between computational tractability and statistical accuracy for a general family of hypothesis testing problems with combinatorial structures. Based upon an oracle model of computation, which captures the interactions between algorithms and data, we establish a general lower bound that explicitly connects the minimum testing risk under computational budget constraints with the intrinsic probabilistic and combinatorial structures of statistical problems. This lower bound mirrors the classical statistical lower bound by Le Cam (1986) and allows us to quantify the optimal statistical performance achievable given limited computational budgets in a systematic fashion. Under this unified framework, we sharply characterize the statistical-computational phase transition for two testing problems, namely, normal mean detection and sparse principal component detection. For normal mean detection, we consider two combinatorial structures, namely, sparse set and perfect matching. For these problems we identify significant gaps between the optimal statistical accuracy that is achievable under computational tractability constraints and the classical statistical lower bounds. Compared with existing works on computational lower bounds for statistical problems, which consider general polynomial-time algorithms on Turing machines, and rely on computational hardness hypotheses on problems like planted clique detection, we focus on the oracle computational model, which covers a broad range of popular algorithms, and do not rely on unproven hypotheses. Moreover, our result provides an intuitive and concrete interpretation for the intrinsic computational intractability of high-dimensional statistical problems. One byproduct of our result is a lower bound for a strict generalization of the matrix permanent problem, which is of independent interest.
  • We study parameter estimation and asymptotic inference for sparse nonlinear regression. More specifically, we assume the data are given by $y = f( x^\top \beta^* ) + \epsilon$, where $f$ is nonlinear. To recover $\beta^*$, we propose an $\ell_1$-regularized least-squares estimator. Unlike classical linear regression, the corresponding optimization problem is nonconvex because of the nonlinearity of $f$. In spite of the nonconvexity, we prove that under mild conditions, every stationary point of the objective enjoys an optimal statistical rate of convergence. In addition, we provide an efficient algorithm that provably converges to a stationary point. We also access the uncertainty of the obtained estimator. Specifically, based on any stationary point of the objective, we construct valid hypothesis tests and confidence intervals for the low dimensional components of the high-dimensional parameter $\beta^*$. Detailed numerical results are provided to back up our theory.
  • Linear regression studies the problem of estimating a model parameter $\beta^* \in \mathbb{R}^p$, from $n$ observations $\{(y_i,\mathbf{x}_i)\}_{i=1}^n$ from linear model $y_i = \langle \mathbf{x}_i,\beta^* \rangle + \epsilon_i$. We consider a significant generalization in which the relationship between $\langle \mathbf{x}_i,\beta^* \rangle$ and $y_i$ is noisy, quantized to a single bit, potentially nonlinear, noninvertible, as well as unknown. This model is known as the single-index model in statistics, and, among other things, it represents a significant generalization of one-bit compressed sensing. We propose a novel spectral-based estimation procedure and show that we can recover $\beta^*$ in settings (i.e., classes of link function $f$) where previous algorithms fail. In general, our algorithm requires only very mild restrictions on the (unknown) functional relationship between $y_i$ and $\langle \mathbf{x}_i,\beta^* \rangle$. We also consider the high dimensional setting where $\beta^*$ is sparse ,and introduce a two-stage nonconvex framework that addresses estimation challenges in high dimensional regimes where $p \gg n$. For a broad class of link functions between $\langle \mathbf{x}_i,\beta^* \rangle$ and $y_i$, we establish minimax lower bounds that demonstrate the optimality of our estimators in both the classical and high dimensional regimes.
  • Many high dimensional sparse learning problems are formulated as nonconvex optimization. A popular approach to solve these nonconvex optimization problems is through convex relaxations such as linear and semidefinite programming. In this paper, we study the statistical limits of convex relaxations. Particularly, we consider two problems: Mean estimation for sparse principal submatrix and edge probability estimation for stochastic block model. We exploit the sum-of-squares relaxation hierarchy to sharply characterize the limits of a broad class of convex relaxations. Our result shows statistical optimality needs to be compromised for achieving computational tractability using convex relaxations. Compared with existing results on computational lower bounds for statistical problems, which consider general polynomial-time algorithms and rely on computational hardness hypotheses on problems like planted clique detection, our theory focuses on a broad class of convex relaxations and does not rely on unproven hypotheses.
  • We provide a general theory of the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm for inferring high dimensional latent variable models. In particular, we make two contributions: (i) For parameter estimation, we propose a novel high dimensional EM algorithm which naturally incorporates sparsity structure into parameter estimation. With an appropriate initialization, this algorithm converges at a geometric rate and attains an estimator with the (near-)optimal statistical rate of convergence. (ii) Based on the obtained estimator, we propose new inferential procedures for testing hypotheses and constructing confidence intervals for low dimensional components of high dimensional parameters. For a broad family of statistical models, our framework establishes the first computationally feasible approach for optimal estimation and asymptotic inference in high dimensions. Our theory is supported by thorough numerical results.
  • We provide theoretical analysis of the statistical and computational properties of penalized $M$-estimators that can be formulated as the solution to a possibly nonconvex optimization problem. Many important estimators fall in this category, including least squares regression with nonconvex regularization, generalized linear models with nonconvex regularization and sparse elliptical random design regression. For these problems, it is intractable to calculate the global solution due to the nonconvex formulation. In this paper, we propose an approximate regularization path-following method for solving a variety of learning problems with nonconvex objective functions. Under a unified analytic framework, we simultaneously provide explicit statistical and computational rates of convergence for any local solution attained by the algorithm. Computationally, our algorithm attains a global geometric rate of convergence for calculating the full regularization path, which is optimal among all first-order algorithms. Unlike most existing methods that only attain geometric rates of convergence for one single regularization parameter, our algorithm calculates the full regularization path with the same iteration complexity. In particular, we provide a refined iteration complexity bound to sharply characterize the performance of each stage along the regularization path. Statistically, we provide sharp sample complexity analysis for all the approximate local solutions along the regularization path. In particular, our analysis improves upon existing results by providing a more refined sample complexity bound as well as an exact support recovery result for the final estimator. These results show that the final estimator attains an oracle statistical property due to the usage of nonconvex penalty.
  • Sparse principal component analysis (PCA) involves nonconvex optimization for which the global solution is hard to obtain. To address this issue, one popular approach is convex relaxation. However, such an approach may produce suboptimal estimators due to the relaxation effect. To optimally estimate sparse principal subspaces, we propose a two-stage computational framework named "tighten after relax": Within the 'relax' stage, we approximately solve a convex relaxation of sparse PCA with early stopping to obtain a desired initial estimator; For the 'tighten' stage, we propose a novel algorithm called sparse orthogonal iteration pursuit (SOAP), which iteratively refines the initial estimator by directly solving the underlying nonconvex problem. A key concept of this two-stage framework is the basin of attraction. It represents a local region within which the `tighten' stage has desired computational and statistical guarantees. We prove that, the initial estimator obtained from the 'relax' stage falls into such a region, and hence SOAP geometrically converges to a principal subspace estimator which is minimax-optimal within a certain model class. Unlike most existing sparse PCA estimators, our approach applies to the non-spiked covariance models, and adapts to non-Gaussianity as well as dependent data settings. Moreover, through analyzing the computational complexity of the two stages, we illustrate an interesting phenomenon that larger sample size can reduce the total iteration complexity. Our framework motivates a general paradigm for solving many complex statistical problems which involve nonconvex optimization with provable guarantees.
  • We study sparse principal component analysis for high dimensional vector autoregressive time series under a doubly asymptotic framework, which allows the dimension $d$ to scale with the series length $T$. We treat the transition matrix of time series as a nuisance parameter and directly apply sparse principal component analysis on multivariate time series as if the data are independent. We provide explicit non-asymptotic rates of convergence for leading eigenvector estimation and extend this result to principal subspace estimation. Our analysis illustrates that the spectral norm of the transition matrix plays an essential role in determining the final rates. We also characterize sufficient conditions under which sparse principal component analysis attains the optimal parametric rate. Our theoretical results are backed up by thorough numerical studies.