• Transition-metal chalcogenides host various phases of matter, such as charge-density wave (CDW), superconductors, and topological insulators or semimetals. Superconductivity and its competition with CDW in low-dimensional compounds have attracted much interest and stimulated considerable research. Here we report pressure induced superconductivity in a strong spin-orbit (SO) coupled quasi-one-dimensional (1D) transition-metal chalcogenide NbTe$_4$, which is a CDW material under ambient pressure. With increasing pressure, the CDW transition temperature is gradually suppressed, and superconducting transition, which is fingerprinted by a steep resistivity drop, emerges at pressures above 12.4 GPa. Under pressure $p$ = 69 GPa, zero resistance is detected with a transition temperature $T_c$ = 2.2 K and an upper critical field $H_{c2}$= 2 T. We also find large magnetoresistance (MR) up to 102\% at low temperatures, which is a distinct feature differentiating NbTe$_4$ from other conventional CDW materials.
  • Polar metals, commonly defined by the coexistence of polar crystal structure and metallicity, are thought to be scarce because the long-range electrostatic fields favoring the polar structure are expected to be fully screened by the conduction electrons of a metal. Moreover, reducing from three to two dimensions, it remains an open question whether a polar metal can exist. Here we report on the realization of a room temperature two-dimensional polar metal of the B-site type in tri-color (tri-layer) superlattices BaTiO$_3$/SrTiO$_3$/LaTiO$_3$. A combination of atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy with electron energy loss spectroscopy, optical second harmonic generation, electrical transport, and first-principles calculations have revealed the microscopic mechanisms of periodic electric polarization, charge distribution, and orbital symmetry. Our results provide a route to creating all-oxide artificial non-centrosymmetric quasi-two-dimensional metals with exotic quantum states including coexisting ferroelectric, ferromagnetic, and superconducting phases.
  • Evolution is based on the assumption that competing players update their strategies to increase their individual payoffs. However, while the applied updating method can be different, most of previous works proposed uniform models where players use identical way to revise their strategies. In this work we explore how imitation-based or learning attitude and innovation-based or myopic best response attitude compete for space in a complex model where both attitudes are available. In the absence of additional cost the best response trait practically dominates the whole snow-drift game parameter space which is in agreement with the average payoff difference of basic models. When additional cost is involved then the imitation attitude can gradually invade the whole parameter space but this transition happens in a highly nontrivial way. However, the role of competing attitudes is reversed in the stag-hunt parameter space where imitation is more successful in general. Interestingly, a four-state solution can be observed for the latter game which is a consequence of an emerging cyclic dominance between possible states. These phenomena can be understood by analyzing the microscopic invasion processes, which reveals the unequal propagation velocities of strategies and attitudes.
  • Researches have shown difficulties in obtaining proximity while maintaining diversity for solving many-objective optimization problems (MaOPs). The complexities of the true Pareto Front (PF) also pose serious challenges for the pervasive algorithms for their insufficient ability to adapt to the characteristics of the true PF with no priori. This paper proposes a cascade Clustering and reference point incremental Learning based Interactive Algorithm (CLIA) for many-objective optimization. In the cascade clustering process, using reference lines provided by the learning process, individuals are clustered and intraclassly sorted in a bi-level cascade style for better proximity and diversity. In the reference point incremental learning process, using the feedbacks from the clustering process, the proper generation of reference points is gradually obtained by incremental learning and the reference lines are accordingly repositioned. The advantages of the proposed interactive algorithm CLIA lie not only in the proximity obtainment and diversity maintenance but also in the versatility for the diverse PFs which uses only the interactions between the two processes without incurring extra evaluations. The experimental studies on the CEC'2018 MaOP benchmark functions have shown that the proposed algorithm CLIA has satisfactory covering of the true PFs, and is competitive, stable and efficient compared with the state-of-the-art algorithms.
  • The design of routing strategies for traffic-driven epidemic spreading has received increasing attention in recent years. In this paper, we propose an adaptive routing strategy that incorporates topological distance with local epidemic information through a tunable parameter $h$. In the case where the traffic is free of congestion, there exists an optimal value of routing parameter $h$, leading to the maximal epidemic threshold. This means that epidemic spreading can be more effectively controlled by adaptive routing, compared to that of the static shortest path routing scheme. Besides, we find that the optimal value of $h$ can greatly relieve the traffic congestion in the case of finite node-delivering capacity. We expect our work to provide new insights into the effects of dynamic routings on traffic-driven epidemic spreading.
  • In previous studies of spatial public goods game, each player is able to establish a group. However, in real life, some players cannot successfully organize groups for various reasons. In this paper, we propose a mechanism of reputation-driven group formation, in which groups can only be organized by players whose reputation reaches or exceeds a threshold. We define a player's reputation as the frequency of cooperation in the last $T$ time steps. We find that the highest cooperation level can be obtained when groups are only established by pure cooperators who always cooperate in the last $T$ time steps. Effects of the memory length $T$ on cooperation are also studied.
  • In this paper, we study the interplay between individual behaviors and epidemic spreading in a dynamical network. We distribute agents on a square-shaped region with periodic boundary conditions. Every agent is regarded as a node of the network and a wireless link is established between two agents if their geographical distance is less than a certain radius. At each time, every agent assesses the epidemic situation and make decisions on whether it should stay in or leave its current place. An agent will leave its current place with a speed if the number of infected neighbors reaches or exceeds a critical value $E$. Owing to the movement of agents, the network's structure is dynamical. Interestingly, we find that there exists an optimal value of $E$ leading to the maximum epidemic threshold. This means that epidemic spreading can be effectively controlled by risk-averse migration. Besides, we find that the epidemic threshold increases as the recovering rate increases, decreases as the contact radius increases, and is maximized by an optimal moving speed. Our findings offer a deeper understanding of epidemic spreading in dynamical networks.
  • Boson sampling is a well-defined task that is strongly believed to be intractable for classical computers, but can be efficiently solved by a specific quantum simulator. However, an outstanding problem for large-scale experimental boson sampling is the scalability. Here we report an experiment on boson sampling with photon loss, and demonstrate that boson sampling with a few photons lost can increase the sampling rate. Our experiment uses a quantum-dot-micropillar single-photon source demultiplexed into up to seven input ports of a 16*16 mode ultra-low-loss photonic circuit, and we detect three-, four- and five-fold coincidence counts. We implement and validate lossy boson sampling with one and two photons lost, and obtain sampling rates of 187 kHz, 13.6 kHz, and 0.78 kHz for five-, six- and seven-photon boson sampling with two photons lost, which is 9.4, 13.9, and 18.0 times faster than the standard boson sampling, respectively. Our experiment shows an approach to significantly enhance the sampling rate of multiphoton boson sampling.
  • We derive necessary and sufficient conditions for an Ore extension of a Hopf algebra to have a Hopf algebra structure of a certain type. This construction generalizes the notion of Hopf-Ore extension, called a generalized Hopf-Ore extension. We describe the generalized Hopf-Ore extensions of the enveloping algebras of Lie algebras. For some Lie algebras g, the generalized Hopf-Ore extensions of U(g) are classified.
  • A thermal ghost imaging scheme between two distant parties is proposed and experimentally demonstrated over long-distance optical fibers. In the scheme, the weak thermal light is split into two paths. Photons in one path are spatially diffused according to their frequencies by a spatial dispersion component, then illuminate the object and record its spatial transmission information. Photons in the other path are temporally diffused by a temporal dispersion component. By the coincidence measurement between photons of two paths, the object can be imaged in a way of ghost imaging, based on the frequency correlation between photons in the two paths. In the experiment, the weak thermal light source is prepared by the spontaneous four-wave mixing in a silicon waveguide. The temporal dispersion is introduced by single mode fibers of 50 km, which also could be looked as a fiber link. Experimental results show that this scheme can be realized over long-distance optical fibers.
  • Superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SNSPDs) have advanced various frontier scientific and technological fields such as quantum key distribution and deep space communications. However, limited by available cooling technology, all past experimental demonstrations have had ground-based applications. In this work we demonstrate a SNSPD system using a hybrid cryocooler compatible with space applications. With a minimum operational temperature of 2.8 K, this SNSPD system presents a maximum system detection efficiency of over 50% and a timing jitter of 48 ps, which paves the way for various space applications.
  • Stochastic gradient descent algorithm has been successfully applied on support vector machines (called PEGASOS) for many classification problems. In this paper, stochastic gradient descent algorithm is investigated to twin support vector machines for classification. Compared with PEGASOS, the proposed stochastic gradient twin support vector machines (SGTSVM) is insensitive on stochastic sampling for stochastic gradient descent algorithm. In theory, we prove the convergence of SGTSVM instead of almost sure convergence of PEGASOS. For uniformly sampling, the approximation between SGTSVM and twin support vector machines is also given, while PEGASOS only has an opportunity to obtain an approximation of support vector machines. In addition, the nonlinear SGTSVM is derived directly from its linear case. Experimental results on both artificial datasets and large scale problems show the stable performance of SGTSVM with a fast learning speed.
  • Quantum mechanics provides means of generating genuine randomness that is impossible with deterministic classical processes. Remarkably, the unpredictability of randomness can be certified in a self-testing manner that is independent of implementation devices. Here, we present an experimental demonstration of self-testing quantum random number generation based on an detection-loophole free Bell test with entangled photons. In the randomness analysis, without the assumption of independent identical distribution, we consider the worst case scenario that the adversary launches the most powerful attacks against quantum adversary. After considering statistical fluctuations and applying an 80 Gb $\times$ 45.6 Mb Toeplitz matrix hashing, we achieve a final random bit rate of 114 bits/s, with a failure probability less than $10^{-5}$. Such self-testing random number generators mark a critical step towards realistic applications in cryptography and fundamental physics tests.
  • Covert communication offers a method to transmit messages in such a way that it is not possible to detect that the communication is happening at all. In this work, we report an experimental demonstration of covert communication that is provably secure against unbounded quantum adversaries. The covert communication is carried out over 10 km of optical fiber, addressing the challenges associated with transmission over metropolitan distances. We deploy the protocol in a dense wavelength-division multiplexing infrastructure, where our system has to coexist with a co-propagating C-band classical channel. The noise from the classical channel allows us to perform covert communication in a neighbouring channel. We perform an optimization of all protocol parameters and report the transmission of three different messages with varying levels of security. Our results showcase the feasibility of secure covert communication in a practical setting, with several possible future improvements from both theory and experiment.
  • A quantum money scheme enables a trusted bank to provide untrusted users with verifiable quantum banknotes that cannot be forged. In this work, we report an experimental demonstration of the preparation and verification of unforgeable quantum banknotes. We employ a security analysis that takes experimental imperfections fully into account. We measure a total of $3.6\times 10^6$ states in one verification round, limiting the forging probability to $10^{-7}$ based on the security analysis. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of preparing and verifying quantum banknotes using currently available experimental techniques.
  • We design an impedance matching underwater acoustic bend with pentamode microstructure. The proposed bend is assembled by pentamode lattice. The effective density and compressive mod- ulus of each unit cell can be tuned simultaneously, which are modulated to guarantee both the bending effect and high transmission. The standard deviations of transmitted phase are calculated to quantitatively evaluate the degree of the distortion of the transmitted wavefront, while the trans- mission is calculated to appraise the degree of acoustic impedance matching. The low standard deviations and high transmission indicate that the designed bend has a nice broadband bending effect and is impedance-matched to water. This design has potential applications in underwater communication and underwater detection.
  • Precise control of elastic waves in modes and coherences is of great use in reinforcing nowadays elastic energy harvesting/storage, nondestructive testing, wave-mater interaction, high sensitivity sensing and information processing, etc. All these implementations are expected to have elastic transmission with lower transmission losses and higher degree of freedom in transmission path. Inspired by topological states of quantum matters, especially quantum spin Hall effects (QSHEs) providing passive solutions of unique disorder-immune surface states protected by underlying nontrivial topological invariants of the bulk, thus solving severe performance trade-offs in experimentally realizable topologically ordered states. Here, we demonstrate experimentally the first elastic analogue of QSHE, by a concise phononic crystal plate with only perforated holes. Strong elastic spin-orbit coupling is realized accompanied by the first topologically-protected phononic circuits with both robustness and negligible propagation loss overcoming many circuit- and system-level performance limits induced by scattering. This elegant approach in a monolithic substrate opens up the possibility of realizing topological materials for phonons in both static and time-dependent regimes, can be immediately applied to multifarious chip-scale devices with both topological protection and massive integration, such as on-chip elastic wave-guiding, elastic splitter, elastic resonator with high quality factor, and even (pseudo-)spin filter.
  • SnSe is a promising thermoelectric material with record-breaking figure of merit, \textit{i.e., ZT}. As a semiconductor, optimal electrical dosage is the key challenge to maximize \textit{ZT} in SnSe. However, to date a comprehensive understanding of the electronic structure and most critically, the self-hole doping mechanism in SnSe is still absent. Here, we report the highly anisotropic electronic structure of SnSe investigated by both angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and quantum transport, in which a unique "\textit{pudding-mold}" shaped valence band with quasi-linear energy dispersion is revealed. We prove that the electrical doping in SnSe is extrinsically controlled by the formation of SnSe$_{2}$ micro-domains induced by local phase segregation. Using different growth methods and conditions, we have achieved wide tuning of hole doping in SnSe, ranging from intrinsic semiconducting behaviour to typical metal with carrier density of $1.23\times 10^{18}$ cm$^{-3}$ at room temperature. The resulting multi-valley transport in $p$-SnSe is characterized by non-saturating weak localization along the armchair axis, due to strong intervalley scattering enhanced by in-plane ferroelectric dipole field of the puckering lattice. Strikingly, quantum oscillations of magnetoresistance reveal three-dimensional electronic structure with unusual interlayer coupling strength in $p$-SnSe, which is correlated to the interweaving of SnSe individual layers by unique point dislocation defects. Our results suggest that defect engineering may provide versatile routes in improving the thermoelectric performance of the SnSe family.
  • The output impedance matrix of a grid-connected converter plays an important role in analyzing system stability. Due to the dynamics of the DC-link control and the phase locked loop (PLL), the output impedance matrices of the converter and grid are difficult to be diagonally decoupled simultaneously, neither in the dq domain nor in the phase domain. It weakens the effectiveness of impedance-based stability criterion (ISC) in system oscillation analysis. To this end, this paper innovatively proposes the generalized-impedance based stability criterion (GISC) to reduce the dimension of the transfer function matrix and simplify system small-signal stability analysis. Firstly, the impedances of the converter and the grid in polar coordinates are formulated, and the concept of generalized-impedance of the converter and the grid is put forward. Secondly, through strict mathematical derivation, the equation that implies the dynamic interaction between the converter and the grid is then extracted from the characteristic equation of the grid-connected converter system. Using the proposed method, the small-signal instability of system can be interpreted as the resonance of the generalized-impedances of the converter and the grid. Besides, the GISC is equivalent to ISC when the dynamics of the outer-loop control and PLL are not considered. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed method is further verified using the MATLAB based digital simulation and RT-LAB based hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) simulation.
  • Warped cones are metric spaces introduced by John Roe from discrete group actions on compact metric spaces to produce interesting examples in coarse geometry. We show that a certain class of warped cones $\mathcal{O}_\Gamma (M)$ admit a fibred coarse embedding into a $L_p$-space ($1\leq p<\infty$) if and only if the discrete group $\Gamma$ admits a proper affine isometric action on a $L_p$-space. This actually holds for any class of Banach spaces stable under taking Lebesgue-Bochner $L_p$-spaces and ultraproducts, e.g., uniformly convex Banach spaces or Banach spaces with nontrivial type. It follows that the maximal coarse Baum-Connes conjecture and the coarse Novikov conjecture hold for a certain class of warped cones which do not coarsely embed into any $L_p$-space for any $1\leq p<\infty$.
  • Extensive cooperation among unrelated individuals is unique to humans, who often sacrifice personal benefits for the common good and work together to achieve what they are unable to execute alone. The evolutionary success of our species is indeed due, to a large degree, to our unparalleled other-regarding abilities. Yet, a comprehensive understanding of human cooperation remains a formidable challenge. Recent research in social science indicates that it is important to focus on the collective behavior that emerges as the result of the interactions among individuals, groups, and even societies. Non-equilibrium statistical physics, in particular Monte Carlo methods and the theory of collective behavior of interacting particles near phase transition points, has proven to be very valuable for understanding counterintuitive evolutionary outcomes. By studying models of human cooperation as classical spin models, a physicist can draw on familiar settings from statistical physics. However, unlike pairwise interactions among particles that typically govern solid-state physics systems, interactions among humans often involve group interactions, and they also involve a larger number of possible states even for the most simplified description of reality. The complexity of solutions therefore often surpasses that observed in physical systems. Here we review experimental and theoretical research that advances our understanding of human cooperation, focusing on spatial pattern formation, on the spatiotemporal dynamics of observed solutions, and on self-organization that may either promote or hinder socially favorable states.
  • In this article, a feasible switchyard design is proposed for the Shanghai soft x-ray free electron laser facility. In the proposed scheme, a switchyard is used to transport the electron beam to different undulator lines. Three-dimensional start-to-end simulations have been carried out to research the beam dynamic during transportation. The results show that the emittance of the electron beam increases less than 10%, at meanwhile, the peak current, the energy spread and the bunch length are not spoiled as the beam passes through the switchyard. The microbunching instability of the beam and the jitter of the linear accelerator (linac) are analyzed as well.
  • Realizing long distance entanglement swapping with independent sources in the real-world condition is important for both future quantum network and fundamental study of quantum theory. Currently, demonstration over a few of tens kilometer underground optical fiber has been achieved. However, future applications demand entanglement swapping over longer distance with more complicated environment. We exploit two independent 1-GHz-clock sequential time-bin entangled photon-pair sources, develop several automatic stability controls, and successfully implement a field test of entanglement swapping over more than 100-km optical fiber link including coiled, underground and suspended optical fibers. Our result verifies the feasibility of such technologies for long distance quantum network and for many interesting quantum information experiments.
  • The multi-TeV $\gamma$-rays from the Galactic Center (GC) have a cutoff at tens of TeV, whereas the diffuse emission has no such cutoff, which is regarded as an indication of PeV proton acceleration by the HESS experiment. It is important to understand the inconsistency and study the possibility that PeV cosmic-ray acceleration could account for the apparently contradictory point and diffuse $\gamma$-ray spectra. In this work, we propose that the cosmic rays are accelerated up to $>$PeV in GC. The interaction between cosmic rays and molecular clouds is responsible for the multi-TeV $\gamma$-ray emissions from both the point source and diffuse sources today. Enhanced by the small volume filling factor (VFF) of the clumpy structure, the absorption of the $\gamma$-rays leads to a sharp cutoff spectrum at tens of TeV produced in the GC. Away from galactic center, the VFF grows and the absorption enhancement becomes negligible. As a result, the spectra of $\gamma$-ray emissions for both point source and diffuse sources can be successfully reproduced under such self-consistent picture. In addition, a "surviving-tail" at $\sim$100 TeV is expected from the point source, which can be observed by future projects CTA and LHAASO. Neutrinos are simultaneously produced during proton-proton (PP) collision. With 5-10 years observations, the KM3Net experiment will be able to detect the PeV source according to our calculation.
  • We study the quantum phase transitions in the nickel pnctides, CeNi$_{2-\delta}$(As$_{1-x}$P$_{x}$)$_{2}$ ($\delta$ $\approx$ 0.07-0.22). This series displays the distinct heavy fermion behavior in the rarely studied parameter regime of dilute carrier limit. We systematically investigate the magnetization, specific heat and electrical transport down to low temperatures. Upon increasing the P-content, the antiferromagnetic order of the Ce-4$f$ moment is suppressed continuously and vanishes at $x_c \sim$ 0.55. At this doping, the temperature dependences of the specific heat and longitudinal resistivity display non-Fermi liquid behavior. Both the residual resistivity $\rho_0$ and the Sommerfeld coefficient $\gamma_0$ are sharply peaked around $x_c$. When the P-content reaches close to 100\%, we observe a clear low-temperature crossover into the Fermi liquid regime. In contrast to what happens in the parent compound $x$ = 0.0 as a function of pressure, we find a surprising result that the non-Fermi liquid behavior persists over a nonzero range of doping concentration, $x_c<x<0.9$. In this doping range, at the lowest measured temperatures, the temperature dependence of the specific-heat coefficient is logarithmically divergent and that of the electrical resistivity is linear. We discuss the properties of CeNi$_{2-\delta}$(As$_{1-x}$P$_{x}$)$_{2}$ in comparison with those of its 1111 counterpart, CeNi(As$_{1-x}$P$_{x}$)O. Our results indicate a non-Fermi liquid phase in the global phase diagram of heavy fermion metals.