• Cell-Free (CF) Massive MIMO is an alternative topology for future wireless networks, where a large number of single-antenna access points (APs) are distributed over the coverage area. There are no cells but all users are jointly served by the APs using network MIMO methods. Prior works have claimed that CF Massive MIMO inherits the basic properties of cellular Massive MIMO, namely channel hardening and favorable propagation. In this paper, we evaluate if one can rely on these properties when having a realistic stochastic AP deployment. Our results show that channel hardening only appears in special cases, for example, when the pathloss exponent is small. However, by using 5--10 antennas per AP, instead of one, we can substantially improve the hardening. Only spatially well-separated users will exhibit favorable propagation, but when adding more antennas and/or reducing the pathloss exponent, it becomes more likely for favorable propagation to occur. The conclusion is that we cannot rely on channel hardening and favorable propagation when analyzing and designing CF Massive MIMO networks, but we need to use achievable rate expressions and resource allocation schemes that work well also in the absence of these properties. Some options are reviewed in this paper.
  • Long Term Evolution (LTE)-Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN) Path Aggregation (LWPA) based on Multi-path Transmission Control Protocol (MPTCP) has been under standardization procedure as a promising and cost-efficient solution to boost Downlink (DL) data rate and handle the rapidly increasing data traffic. This paper aims at providing tractable analysis for the DL performance evaluation of large-scale LWPA networks with the help of tools from stochastic geometry. We consider a simple yet practical model to determine under which conditions a native WLAN Access Point (AP) will work under LWPA mode to help increasing the received data rate. Using stochastic spatial models for the distribution of WLAN APs and LTE Base Stations (BSs), we analyze the density of active LWPA-mode WiFi APs in the considered network model, which further leads to closed-form expressions on the DL data rate and area spectral efficiency (ASE) improvement. Our numerical results illustrate the impact of different network parameters on the performance of LWPA networks, which can be useful for further performance optimization.
  • The analysis and planning methods for competing risks model have been described in the literatures in recent decades, and non-inferiority clinical trials are helpful in current pharmaceutical practice. Analytical methods for non-inferiority clinical trials in the presence of competing risks were investigated by Parpia et al., who indicated that the proportional sub-distribution hazard model is appropriate in the context of biological studies. However, the analytical methods of competing risks model differ from those appropriate for analyzing non-inferiority clinical trials with a single outcome; thus, a corresponding method for planning such trials is necessary. A sample size formula for non-inferiority clinical trials in the presence of competing risks based on the proportional sub-distribution hazard model is presented in this paper. The primary endpoint relies on the sub-distribution hazard ratio. A total of 120 simulations and an example based on a randomized controlled trial verified the empirical performance of the presented formula. The results demonstrate that the empirical power of sample size formulas based on the Weibull distribution for non-inferiority clinical trials with competing risks can reach the targeted power.
  • In this work, we prove rigorous convergence properties for a semi-discrete, moment-based approximation of a model kinetic equation in one dimension. This approximation is equivalent to a standard spectral method in the velocity variable of the kinetic distribution and, as such, is accompanied by standard algebraic estimates of the form $N^{-q}$, where $N$ is the number of modes and $q>0$ depends on the regularity of the solution. However, in the multiscale setting, the error estimate can be expressed in terms of the scaling parameter $\epsilon$, which measures the ratio of the mean-free-path to the characteristic domain length. We show that, for isotropic initial conditions, the error in the spectral approximation is $\mathcal{O}(\epsilon^{N+1})$. More surprisingly, the coefficients of the expansion satisfy super convergence properties. In particular, the error of the $\ell^{th}$ coefficient of the expansion scales like $\mathcal{O}(\epsilon^{2N})$ when $\ell =0$ and $\mathcal{O}(\epsilon^{2N+2-\ell})$ for all $1\leq \ell \leq N$. This result is significant, because the low-order coefficients correspond to physically relevant quantities of the underlying system. All the above estimates involve constants depending on $N$, the time $t$, and the initial condition. We investigate specifically the dependence on $N$, in order to assess whether increasing $N$ actually yields an additional factor of $\epsilon$ in the error. Numerical tests will also be presented to support the theoretical results.
  • In this paper, we investigate the effect of bursty traffic and random availability of caching helpers in a wireless caching system. More explicitly, we consider a general system consisting of a caching helper with its dedicated user in proximity and another non-dedicated user requesting for content. Both the non-dedicated user and the helper have limited storage capabilities. When the user is not able to locate the requested content in its own cache, then its request shall be served either by the caching helper or by a large data center. Assuming bursty request arrivals at the caching helper from its dedicated destination, its availability to serve other users is affected by the request rate, which will further affect the system throughput and the delay experienced by the non-dedicated user. We characterize the maximum weighted throughput and the average delay per packet of the considered system, taking into account the request arrival rate of the caching helper, the request probability of the user and the availability of the data center. Our results provide fundamental insights in the throughput and delay behavior of such systems, which are essential for further investigation in larger topologies.
  • Explaining underlying causes or effects about events is a challenging but valuable task. We define a novel problem of generating explanations of a time series event by (1) searching cause and effect relationships of the time series with textual data and (2) constructing a connecting chain between them to generate an explanation. To detect causal features from text, we propose a novel method based on the Granger causality of time series between features extracted from text such as N-grams, topics, sentiments, and their composition. The generation of the sequence of causal entities requires a commonsense causative knowledge base with efficient reasoning. To ensure good interpretability and appropriate lexical usage we combine symbolic and neural representations, using a neural reasoning algorithm trained on commonsense causal tuples to predict the next cause step. Our quantitative and human analysis show empirical evidence that our method successfully extracts meaningful causality relationships between time series with textual features and generates appropriate explanation between them.
  • Departing from the conventional cache hit optimization in cache-enabled wireless networks, we consider an alternative optimization approach for the probabilistic caching placement in stochastic wireless D2D caching networks taking into account the reliability of D2D transmissions. Using tools from stochastic geometry, we provide a closed-form approximation of cache-aided throughput, which measures the density of successfully served requests by local device caches, and we obtain the optimal caching probabilities with numerical optimization. Compared to the cache-hit-optimal case, the optimal caching probabilities obtained by cache-aided throughput optimization show notable gain in terms of the density of successfully served user requests, particularly in dense user environments.
  • We propose a decentralized access control scheme for interference management in D2D (device-to-device) underlaid cellular networks. Our method combines SIR-aware link activation with cellular exclusion regions in a case where D2D links opportunistically access the licensed cellular spectrum. Analytical expressions and tight approximations for the coverage probabilities of cellular and D2D links are derived. We characterize the impact of the guard zone radius and the SIR threshold on the D2D area spectral efficiency and cellular coverage. A tractable approach was proposed in order to find the SIR threshold and guard zone radius, which maximize the area spectral efficiency of the D2D communication while ensuring sufficient coverage probability for cellular uplink users. Simulations validate the accuracy of our analytical results and show the performance gain of our proposed scheme compared to existing state-of-the-art solutions.
  • While the Pontryagin Maximum Principle can be used to calculate candidate extremals for optimal orbital transfer problems, these candidates cannot be guaranteed to be at least locally optimal unless sufficient optimality conditions are satisfied. In this paper, through constructing a parameterized family of extremals around a reference extremal, some second-order necessary and sufficient conditions for the strong-local optimality of the free-time multi-burn fuel-optimal transfer are established under certain regularity assumptions. Moreover, the numerical procedure for computing these optimality conditions is presented. Finally, two medium-thrust fuel-optimal trajectories with different number of burn arcs for a typical orbital transfer problem are computed and the local optimality of the two computed trajectories are tested thanks to the second-order optimality conditions established in this paper.
  • In this paper, we analyze a shared access network with a fixed primary node and randomly distributed secondary nodes whose distribution follows a Poisson point process (PPP). The secondaries use a random access protocol allowing them to access the channel with probabilities that depend on the queue size of the primary. Assuming a system with multipacket reception (MPR) receivers having bursty packet arrivals at the primary and saturation at the secondaries, our protocol can be tuned to alleviate congestion at the primary. We study the throughput of the secondary network and the primary average delay, as well as the impact of the secondary node access probability and transmit power. We formulate an optimization problem to maximize the throughput of the secondary network under delay constraints for the primary node, which in the case that no congestion control is performed has a closed form expression providing the optimal access probability. Our numerical results illustrate the impact of network operating parameters on the performance of the proposed priority-based shared access protocol.
  • This paper presents a novel neighboring extremal approach to establish the neighboring optimal guidance (NOG) strategy for fixed-time low-thrust multi-burn orbital transfer problems. Unlike the classical variational methods which define and solve an accessory minimum problem (AMP) to design the NOG, the core of the proposed method is to construct a parameterized family of neighboring extremals around a nominal one. A geometric analysis on the projection behavior of the parameterized neighboring extremals shows that it is impossible to establish the NOG unless not only the typical Jacobi condition (JC) between switching times but also a transversal condition (TC) at each switching time is satisfied. According to the theory of field of extremals, the JC and the TC, once satisfied, are also sufficient to ensure a multi-burn extremal trajectory to be locally optimal. Then, through deriving the first-order Taylor expansion of the parameterized neighboring extremals, the neighboring optimal feedbacks on thrust direction and switching times are obtained. Finally, to verify the development of this paper, a fixed-time low-thrust fuel-optimal orbital transfer problem is calculated.
  • In this paper, we study the key properties of multi-antenna two-tier networks under different system configurations. Based on stochastic geometry, we derive the expressions and approximations for the users' average data rate. Through the more tractable approximations, the theoretical analysis can be greatly simplified. We find that the differences in density and transmit power between two tiers, together with range expansion bias significantly affect the users' data rate. Besides, for the purpose of area spectral efficiency (ASE) maximization, we find that the optimal number of active users for each tier is approximately fixed portion of the sum of the number of antennas plus one. Interestingly, the optimal settings are insensitive to different configurations between two tiers. Last but not the least, if the number of antennas of macro base stations (MBSs) is sufficiently larger than that of small cell base stations (SBSs), we find that range expansion will improve ASE.
  • This paper aims at answering two fundamental questions: how area spectral efficiency (ASE) behaves with different system parameters; how to design an energy-efficient network. Based on stochastic geometry, we obtain the expression and a tight lower-bound for ASE of Poisson distributed networks considering multi-user MIMO (MU-MIMO) transmission. With the help of the lower-bound, some interesting results are observed. These results are validated via numerical results for the original expression. We find that ASE can be viewed as a concave function with respect to the number of antennas and active users. For the purpose of maximizing ASE, we demonstrate that the optimal number of active users is a fixed portion of the number of antennas. With optimal number of active users, we observe that ASE increases linearly with the number of antennas. Another work of this paper is joint optimization of the base station (BS) density, the number of antennas and active users to minimize the network energy consumption. It is discovered that the optimal combination of the number of antennas and active users is the solution that maximizes the energy-efficiency. Besides the optimal algorithm, we propose a suboptimal algorithm to reduce the computational complexity, which can achieve near optimal performance.
  • Wireless content caching in small cell networks (SCNs) has recently been considered as an efficient way to reduce the traffic and the energy consumption of the backhaul in emerging heterogeneous cellular networks (HetNets). In this paper, we consider a cluster-centric SCN with combined design of cooperative caching and transmission policy. Small base stations (SBSs) are grouped into disjoint clusters, in which in-cluster cache space is utilized as an entity. We propose a combined caching scheme where part of the available cache space is reserved for caching the most popular content in every SBS, while the remaining is used for cooperatively caching different partitions of the less popular content in different SBSs, as a means to increase local content diversity. Depending on the availability and placement of the requested content, coordinated multipoint (CoMP) technique with either joint transmission (JT) or parallel transmission (PT) is used to deliver content to the served user. Using Poisson point process (PPP) for the SBS location distribution and a hexagonal grid model for the clusters, we provide analytical results on the successful content delivery probability of both transmission schemes for a user located at the cluster center. Our analysis shows an inherent tradeoff between transmission diversity and content diversity in our combined caching-transmission design. We also study optimal cache space assignment for two objective functions: maximization of the cache service performance and the energy efficiency. Simulation results show that the proposed scheme achieves performance gain by leveraging cache-level and signal-level cooperation and adapting to the network environment and user QoS requirements.
  • Second order systems whose drift is defined by the gradient of a given potential are considered, and minimization of the $L^1$-norm of the control is addressed. An analysis of the extremal flow emphasizes the role of singular trajectories of order two [25,29]; the case of the two-body potential is treated in detail. In $L^1$-minimization, regular extremals are associated with controls whose norm is bang-bang; in order to assess their optimality properties, sufficient conditions are given for broken extremals and related to the no-fold conditions of [20]. An example of numerical verification of these conditions is proposed on a problem coming from space mechanics.
  • In this paper, the L1-minimization for the translational motion of a spacecraft in a circular restricted three-body problem (CRTBP) is considered. Necessary con- ditions are derived by using the Pontryagin Maximum Principle, revealing the existence of bang-bang and singular controls. Singular extremals are detailed, re- calling the existence of the Fuller phenomena according to the theories developed by Marchal in Ref. [14] and Zelikin et al. in Refs. [12, 13]. The sufficient opti- mality conditions for the L1-minimization problem with fixed endpoints have been solved in Ref. [22]. In this paper, through constructing a parameterised family of extremals, some second-order sufficient conditions are established not only for the case that the final point is fixed but also for the case that the final point lies on a smooth submanifold. In addition, the numerical implementation for the optimality conditions is presented. Finally, approximating the Earth-Moon-Spacecraft system as a CRTBP, an L1-minimization trajectory for the translational motion of a spacecraft is computed by employing a combination of a shooting method with a continuation method of Caillau et al. in Refs. [4, 5], and the local optimality of the computed trajectory is tested thanks to the second-order optimality conditions established in this paper.
  • We develop 3rd order maximum-principle-satisfying direct discontinuous Galerkin methods [8, 9, 19, 21] for convection diffusion equations on unstructured triangular mesh. We carefully calculate the normal derivative numerical flux across element edges and prove that, with proper choice of parameter pair $(\beta_0,\beta_1)$ in the numerical flux, the quadratic polynomial solution satisfies strict maximum principle. The polynomial solution is bounded within the given range and third order accuracy is maintained. There is no geometric restriction on the meshes and obtuse triangles are allowed in the partition. A sequence of numerical examples are carried out to demonstrate the accuracy and capability of the maximum-principle-satisfying limiter.
  • In this paper, we analyze the performance of cellular networks and study the optimal base station (BS) density to reduce the network power consumption. In contrast to previous works with similar purpose, we consider Poisson traffic for users' traffic model. In such situation, each BS can be viewed as M/G/1 queuing model. Based on theory of stochastic geometry, we analyze users' signal-to-interference-plus-noise-ratio (SINR) and obtain the average transmission time of each packet. While most of the previous works on SINR analysis in academia considered full buffer traffic, our analysis provides a basic framework to estimate the performance of cellular networks with burst traffic. We find that the users' SINR depends on the average transmission probability of BSs, which is defined by a nonlinear equation. As it is difficult to obtain the closed-form solution, we solve this nonlinear equation by bisection method. Besides, we formulate the optimization problem to minimize the area power consumption. An iteration algorithm is proposed to derive the local optimal BS density, and the numerical result shows that the proposed algorithm can converge to the global optimal BS density. At the end, the impact of BS density on users' SINR and average packet delay will be discussed.
  • In this paper, we present the controllability properties of Keplerian motion controlled by low-thrust control systems. The low-thrust control system, compared with high or even impulsive control system, provide a fuel-efficient means to control the Keplerian motion of a satellite in restricted two-body problem. We obtain that, for any positive value of maximum thrust, the motion is controllable for orbital transfer problems. For two other typical problems: de-orbit problem and orbital insertion problem, which have state constraints, the motion is controllable if and only if the maximum thrust is bigger than a limiting value. Finally, two numerical examples are given to show the numerical method to compute the limiting value.
  • In this paper, we propose a distributed interference and channel-aware opportunistic access control technique for D2D underlaid cellular networks, in which each potential D2D link is active whenever its estimated signal-to-interference ratio (SIR) is above a predetermined threshold so as to maximize the D2D area spectral efficiency. The objective of our SIR-aware opportunistic access scheme is to provide sufficient coverage probability and to increase the aggregate rate of D2D links by harnessing interference caused by dense underlaid D2D users using an adaptive decision activation threshold. We determine the optimum D2D activation probability and threshold, building on analytical expressions for the coverage probabilities and area spectral efficiency of D2D links derived using stochastic geometry. Specifically, we provide two expressions for the optimal SIR threshold, which can be applied in a decentralized way on each D2D link, so as to maximize the D2D area spectral efficiency derived using the unconditional and conditional D2D success probability respectively. Simulation results in different network settings show the performance gains of both SIR-aware threshold scheduling methods in terms of D2D link coverage probability, area spectral efficiency, and average sum rate compared to existing channel-aware access schemes.