• Combined scanning tunneling microscopy, spectroscopy and local barrier height (LBH) studies show that low-temperature-cleaved optimally-doped Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 crystals with x=0.06, with Tc = 22 K, have complicated morphologies. Although the cleavage surface and hence the morphologies are variable, the superconducting gap maps show the same gap widths and nanometer size inhomogeneities irrelevant to the morphology. Based on the spectroscopy and LBH maps, the bright patches and dark stripes in the morphologies are identified as Ba and As dominated surface terminations, respectively. Magnetic impurities, possibly due to cobalt or Fe atoms, are believed to create local in-gap state and in addition suppress the superconducting coherence peaks. This study will clarify the confusion on the cleavage surface terminations of the Fe-based superconductors, and its relation with the electronic structures.
  • We report on the use of helium ion implantation to independently control the out-of-plane lattice constant in epitaxial La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 thin films without changing the in-plane lattice constants. The process is reversible by a vacuum anneal. Resistance and magnetization measurements show that even a small increase in the out-of-plane lattice constant of less than 1% can shift the metal-insulator transition and Curie temperatures by more than 100 {\deg}C. Unlike conventional epitaxy-based strain tuning methods which are constrained not only by the Poisson effect but by the limited set of available substrates, the present study shows that strain can be independently and continuously controlled along a single axis. This permits novel control over orbital populations through Jahn-Teller effects, as shown by Monte Carlo simulations on a double-exchange model. The ability to reversibly control a single lattice parameter substantially broadens the phase space for experimental exploration of predictive models and leads to new possibilities for control over materials' functional properties.
  • Organic spintronic devices have been appealing because of the long spin life time of the charge carriers in the organic materials and their low cost, flexibility and chemical diversity. In previous studies, the control of resistance of organic spin valves is generally achieved by the alignment of the magnetization directions of the two ferromagnetic electrodes, generating magnetoresistance.1 Here we employ a new knob to tune the resistance of organic spin valves by adding a thin ferroelectric interfacial layer between the ferromagnetic electrode and the organic spacer. We show that the resistance can be controlled by not only the spin alignment of the two ferromagnetic electrodes, but also by the electric polarization of the interfacial ferroelectric layer: the MR of the spin valve depends strongly on the history of the bias voltage which is correlated with the polarization of the ferroelectric layer; the MR even changes sign when the electric polarization of the ferroelectric layer is reversed. This new tunability can be understood in terms of the change of relative energy level alignment between ferromagnetic electrode and the organic spacer caused by the electric dipole moment of the ferroelectric layer. These findings enable active control of resistance using both electric and magnetic fields, opening up possibility for multi-state organic spin valves and shed light on the mechanism of the spin transport in organic spin valves.
  • The oxygen stoichiometry has a large influence on the physical and chemical properties of complex oxides. Most of the functionality in e.g. catalysis and electrochemistry depends in particular on control of the oxygen stoichiometry. In order to understand the fundamental properties of intrinsic surfaces of oxygen-deficient complex oxides, we report on in situ temperature dependent scanning tunnelling spectroscopy experiments on pristine oxygen deficient, epitaxial manganite films. Although these films are insulating in subsequent ex situ in-plane electronic transport experiments at all temperatures, in situ scanning tunnelling spectroscopic data reveal that the surface of these films exhibits a metal-insulator transition (MIT) at 120 K, coincident with the onset of ferromagnetic ordering of small clusters in the bulk of the oxygen-deficient film. The surprising proximity of the surface MIT transition temperature of nonstoichiometric films with that of the fully oxygenated bulk suggests that the electronic properties in the surface region are not significantly affected by oxygen deficiency in the bulk. This carries important implications for the understanding and functional design of complex oxides and their interfaces with specific electronic properties for catalysis, oxide electronics and electrochemistry.
  • Electronically phase separated manganite wires are found to exhibit controllable metal-insulator transitions under local electric fields. The switching characteristics are shown to be fully reversible, polarity independent, and highly resistant to thermal breakdown caused by repeated cycling. It is further demonstrated that multiple discrete resistive states can be accessed in a single wire. The results conform to a phenomenological model in which the inherent nanoscale insulating and metallic domains are rearranged through electrophoretic-like processes to open and close percolation channels.
  • An experimental study was conducted on controlling the growth mode of La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 thin films on SrTiO3 substrates using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) by tuning growth temperature, pressure and laser fluence. Different thin film morphology, crystallinity and stoichiometry have been observed depending on growth parameters. To understand the microscopic origin, the adatom nucleation, step advance processes and their relationship to film growth were theoretically analyzed and a growth diagram was constructed. Three boundaries between highly and poorly crystallized growth, 2D and 3D growth, stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric growth were identified in the growth diagram. A good fit of our experimental observation with the growth diagram was found. This case study demonstrates that a more comprehensive understanding of the growth mode in PLD is possible.
  • The crystal and magnetic structures of single-crystalline hexagonal LuFeO$_3$ films have been studied using x-ray, electron and neutron diffraction methods. The polar structure of these films are found to persist up to 1050 K; and the switchability of the polar behavior is observed at room temperature, indicating ferroelectricity. An antiferromagnetic order was shown to occur below 440 K, followed by a spin reorientation resulting in a weak ferromagnetic order below 130 K. This observation of coexisting multiple ferroic orders demonstrates that hexagonal LuFeO$_3$ films are room-temperature multiferroics.
  • We report a comprehensive study of dc susceptibility, specific heat, neutron diffraction, and inelastic neutron scattering measurements on polycrystalline Ba3(Cr1-xVx)2O8 samples, where x=0, 0.06, 0.15, and 0.53. A Jahn-Teller structure transition occurs for x=0, 0.06, and 0.15 samples and the transition temperature is reduced upon vanadium substitution from 70(2) K at x=0 to 60(2) K at x=0.06 and 0.15. The structure becomes less distorted as x increases and such transition disappears at x=0.53. The observed magnetic excitation spectrum indicates that the singlet ground state remains unaltered and spin gap energy \Delta=1.3(1) meV is identical within the instrument resolution for all x. In addition, the dispersion bandwidth W decreases with increase of x. At x=0.53, W is reduced to 1.4(1) meV from 2.0(1) meV at x=0.
  • We study experimentally and theoretically the electronic and magnetic properties of two insulating double perovskites that show similar atomic and electronic structure, but different magnetic properties. In magnetization measurements, La2ZnIrO6 displays weak ferromagnetic behavior below 7.5 K whereas La2MgIrO6 shows antiferromagnetic behavior (AFM) below TN = 12 K. Electronic structure calculations find that the weak ferromagnetic behavior observed in La2ZnIrO6 is in fact due to canted antiferromagnetism. The calculations also predict canted antiferromagnetic behavior in La2MgIrO6, but intriguingly this was not observed. Neutron diffraction measurements confirm the essentially antiferromagnetic behavior of both systems, but lack the sensitivity to resolve the small (0.22 {\mu}B/Ir) ferromagnetic component in La2ZnIrO6. Overall, the results presented here indicate the crucial role of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and the on-site Coulomb repulsion on the magnetic, transport, and thermodynamic properties of both compounds. The electronic structure calculations show that both compounds, like Sr2IrO4, are Jeff = 1/2 Mott insulators. Our present findings suggest that La2ZnIrO6 and La2MgIrO6 provide a new playground to study the interplay between SOC and on-site Coulomb repulsion in a 5d transition metal oxide.
  • Layered 5d transition metal oxides (TMOs) have attracted significant interest in recent years because of the rich physical properties induced by the interplay between spin-orbit coupling, bandwidth and on-site Coulomb repulsion. In Sr2IrO4, this interplay opens a gap near the Fermi energy and stabilizes a Jeff=1/2 spin-orbital entangled insulating state at low temperatures. Whether this metal-insulating transition (MIT) is Mott-type (electronic-correlation driven) or Slater-type (magnetic-order driven) has been under intense debate. We address this issue via spatially resolved imaging and spectroscopic studies of the Sr2IrO4 surface using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/S). The STS results clearly illustrate the opening of the (~150-250 meV) insulating gap at low temperatures, in qualitative agreement with our density-functional theory (DFT) calculations. More importantly, the measured temperature dependence of the gap width coupled with our DFT+dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) results strongly support the Slater-type MIT scenario in Sr2IrO4. The STS data further reveal a pseudogap structure above the Neel temperature, presumably related to the presence of antiferromagnetic fluctuations.
  • A growth diagram of Lu-Fe-O compounds on MgO (111) substrates using pulsed laser deposition is constructed based on extensive growth experiments. The LuFe$_2$O$_4$ phase can only be grown in a small range of temperature and O$_2$ pressure conditions. An understanding of the growth mechanism of Lu-Fe-O compound films is offered in terms of the thermochemistry at the surface. Superparamagnetism is observed in LuFe$_2$O$_4$ film and is explained in terms of the effect of the impurity h-LuFeO$_3$ phase and structural defects .
  • The self-assembly of iron dots on the insulating surface of NaCl(001) is investigated experimentally and theoretically. Under proper growth conditions, nanometer-scale magnetic iron dots with remarkably narrow size distributions can be achieved in the absence of a wetting layer Furthermore, both the vertical and lateral sizes of the dots can be tuned with the iron dosage without introducing apparent size broadening, even though the clustering is clearly in the strong coarsening regime. These observations are interpreted using a phenomenological mean-field theory, in which a coverage-dependent optimal dot size is selected by strain-mediated dot-dot interactions.