• It has been long hoped that the realization of long-range ferromagnetic order in two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals (vdW) crystals, combined with their rich electronic and optical properties, would open up new possibilities for magnetic, magnetoelectric and magneto-optic applications. However, in 2D systems, the long-range magnetic order is strongly hampered by thermal fluctuations which may be counteracted by magnetic anisotropy, according to the Mermin-Wagner theorem. Prior efforts via defect and composition engineering, and proximity effect only locally or extrinsically introduce magnetic responses. Here we report the first experimental discovery of intrinsic long-range ferromagnetic order in pristine Cr2Ge2Te6 atomic layers by scanning magneto-optic Kerr microscopy. In such a 2D vdW soft ferromagnet, for the first time, an unprecedented control of transition temperature of ~ 35% - 57% enhancement is realized via surprisingly small fields (<= 0.3 Tesla in this work), in stark contrast to the stiffness of the transition temperature to magnetic fields in the three-dimensional regime. We found that the small applied field enables an effective anisotropy far surpassing the tiny magnetocrystalline anisotropy, opening up a sizable spin wave excitation gap. Confirmed by renormalized spin wave theory, we explain the phenomenon and conclude that the unusual field dependence of transition temperature constitutes a hallmark of 2D soft ferromagnetic vdW crystals. Our discovery of 2D soft ferromagnetic Cr2Ge2Te6 presents a close-to-ideal 2D Heisenberg ferromagnet for studying fundamental spin behaviors, and opens the door for exploring new applications such as ultra-compact spintronics.
  • Anisotropy describes the directional dependence of a material's properties such as transport and optical response. In conventional bulk materials, anisotropy is intrinsically related to the crystal structure, and thus not tunable by the gating techniques used in modern electronics. Here we show that, in bilayer black phosphorus with an interlayer twist angle of 90{\deg}, the anisotropy of its electronic structure and optical transitions is tunable by gating. Using first-principles calculations, we predict that a laboratory-accessible gate voltage can induce a hole effective mass that is 30 times larger along one Cartesian axis than along the other axis, and the two axes can be exchanged by flipping the sign of the gate voltage. This gate-controllable band structure also leads to a switchable optical linear dichroism, where the polarization of the lowest-energy optical transitions (absorption or luminescence) is tunable by gating. Thus, anisotropy is a tunable degree of freedom in twisted bilayer black phosphorus.
  • Artificial lattices have been employed in many two-dimensional systems, including those of electrons, atoms and photons, in a quest for massless Dirac particles with flexibility and controllability. Periodically patterned molecule assembly and electrostatic gating as well as moir\'e pattern induced by substrate, have produced electronic states with linear dispersions from isotropic two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). Here we demonstrate that massless Dirac fermions with tunable anisotropic characteristics can, in general, be generated in highly anisotropic 2DEG under slowly varying external periodic potentials. For patterned few-layer black phosphorus superlattices, the new chiral quasiparticles exist exclusively in an isolated energy window and inherit the strong anisotropic properties of pristine black phosphorus. These states exhibit asymmetric Klein tunneling with the direction of incidence for wave packet with perfect transmission deviating from normal incidence by more than 50{\deg} under an appropriate barrier orientation.
  • We find, through first-principles calculations, that hole doping induces a ferromagnetic phase transition in monolayer GaSe. Upon increasing hole density, the average spin magnetic moment per carrier increases and reaches a plateau near 1.0 $\mu_{\rm{B}}$/carrier in a range of $3\times 10^{13}$/cm$^{2}$-$1\times 10^{14}$/cm$^{2}$ with the system in a half-metal state before the moment starts to descend abruptly. The predicted magnetism originates from an exchange splitting of electronic states at the top of the valence band where the density of states exhibits a sharp van Hove singularity in this quasi-two-dimensional system.