• Ultrahigh-power terahertz (THz) radiation sources are essential for many applications, such as nonlinear THz physics, THz-wave based compact accelerators, etc. However, until now none of THz sources reported, whether based upon large-scale accelerators or high power lasers, have produced THz pulses with energies above the millijoule (mJ) barrier. Here we report on the efficient generation of low-frequency (<3 THz) THz pulses with unprecedentedly high energies over 50 mJ. The THz radiation is produced by coherent transition radiation of a picosecond laser-accelerated ultra-bright bunch of relativistic electrons from a solid target. Such high energy THz pulses can not only trigger various nonlinear dynamics in matter, but also open up a new research field of relativistic THz optics.
  • Compact acceleration of a tightly collimated relativistic electron beam with high charge from a laser-plasma interaction has many unique applications. However, currently the well-known schemes, including laser wakefield acceleration from gases and vacuum laser acceleration from solids, often produce electron beams either with low charge or with large divergence angles. In this work, we report the generation of highly collimated electron beams with a divergence angle of a few degrees, quasi-monoenergetic spectra peaked at the MeV level, and extremely high charge ($\sim$100 nC) via a powerful sub-ps laser pulse interacting with a solid target in grazing incidence. Particle-in-cell simulations illustrate a new direct laser acceleration scenario, in which the self-filamentation is triggered in a large-scale near-critical-density plasma and electron bunches are accelerated periodically and collimated by the ultra-intense electromagnetic field. The energy density of such electron beams in high-Z materials reaches to $\sim10^{12} \mathrm{J/m^{3}}$, making it a promising tool to drive warm or even hot dense matter states.
  • The Faraday effect, caused by a magnetic-field-induced change in the optical properties, takes place in a vast variety of systems from a single atomic layer of graphenes to huge galaxies. Currently, it plays a pivot role in many applications such as the manipulation of light and the probing of magnetic fields and material's properties. Basically, this effect causes a polarization rotation of light during its propagation along the magnetic field in a medium. Here, we report an extreme case of the Faraday effect where a linearly polarized ultrashort laser pulse splits in time into two circularly polarized pulses of opposite handedness during its propagation in a highly magnetized plasma. This offers a new degree of freedom for manipulating ultrashort and ultrahigh power laser pulses. Together with technologies of ultra-strong magnetic fields, it may pave the way for novel optical devices, such as magnetized plasma polarizers. In addition, it may offer a powerful means to measure strong magnetic fields in laser-produced plasmas.
  • We report a new scenario of time-of-flight (TOF) technique in which fast neutrons and delayed gamma-ray signals were both recorded in a millisecond time window in harsh environments induced by high-intensity lasers. The delayed gamma signals, arriving far later than the original fast neutron and often being ignored previously, were identified to be the results of radiative captures of thermalized neutrons. The linear correlation between gamma photon number and the fast neutron yield shows that these delayed gamma events can be employed for neutron diagnosis. This method can reduce the detecting efficiency dropping problem caused by prompt high-flux gamma radiation, and provides a new way for neutron diagnosing in high-intensity laser-target interaction experiments.
  • A theoretical analysis for the stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) instability driven by two laser beams with certain frequency difference is presented. It is found that strong coupling and enhanced SRS take place only when the unstable regions for each beam are overlapped in the wavenumber space. Hence a threshold of the beam frequency difference for their decoupling is found as a function of their intensity and plasma density. Based upon this, a strategy to suppress the SRS instability with decoupled broadband lasers (DBLs) is proposed. A DBL can be composed of tens or even hundreds of beamlets, where the beamlets are distributed uniformly in a broad spectrum range such as over 10\% of the central frequency. Decoupling among the beamlets is found due to the limited beamlet energy and suitable frequency difference between neighboring beamlets. Particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that SRS can be almost completely suppressed with DBLs under the laser intensity $\sim10^{15}$ W/cm$^2$. DBLs can be attractive for driving inertial confined fusion.
  • An investigation of the multi-hundred MeV electron beam yield (charge) form helium, nitrogen, neon and argon gas jet plasmas in a laser-plasma wakefield acceleration experiment was carried out. The charge measurement has been made via imaging the electron beam intensity profile on a fluorescent screen into a 14-bit charge coupled device (CCD) which was cross-calibrated with nondestructive electronics-based method. Within given laser and plasma parameters, we found that laser-driven low Z- gas jet targets generate high-quality and well-collimated electron beams with reasonable yields at the level of 10-100 pC. On the other hand, filamentary electron beams which were observed from high-Z gas jets at higher densities reached much higher yield. Evidences for cluster formation were clearly observed in high-Z gases, especially in the argon gas jet target where we received the highest yield of ~ 3 nC
  • We report an overall enhancement of a laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) using the ionization injection in a mixture of 0.3 % nitrogen gas in 99.7 % helium gas. Upon the interaction of 30 TW, 30 fs laser pulses with a gas jet of the above gas mixture, > 300 MeV electron beams were generated at a helium plasma densities of 3.3-8.5*10^18 cm^{-3}. Compared with the electron self-injection in pure helium gas jet, the ionization injection has led to the generation of electron beams with higher energies, higher charge, lower density threshold for trapping, and a narrower energy spread without dark current (low energy electrons) or multiple bunches. It is foreseen that further optimization of such a scheme is expected to bring the electron beam energy-spread down to 1 %, making them suitable for driving ultra-compact free-electron lasers