• For any asymptotically dynamically convex contact manifold $Y$, we show that $SH_*(W)=0$ is a property independent of the choice of topologically simple (i.e.\ $c_1(W)=0$ and $\pi_{1}(Y)\rightarrow \pi_1(W)$ is injective) Liouville filling $W$. In particular, if $Y$ is the boundary of a flexible Weinstein domain, then any topologically simple Liouville filling $W$ has vanishing symplectic homology. As a consequence, we answer a question of Lazarev partially: a contact manifold $Y$ admitting flexible fillings determines the integral cohomology of all the topologically simple Liouville fillings of $Y$. The vanishing result provides an obstruction to flexible fillability. As an application, we show that all Brieskorn manifolds of dimension $\ge 5$ cannot be filled by flexible Weinstein manifolds.
  • Detecting and quantifying anomalies in urban traffic is critical for real-time alerting or re-routing in the short run and urban planning in the long run. We describe a two-step framework that achieves these two goals in a robust, fast, online, and unsupervised manner. First, we adapt stable principal component pursuit to detect anomalies for each road segment. This allows us to pinpoint traffic anomalies early and precisely in space. Then we group the road-level anomalies across time and space into meaningful anomaly events using a simple graph expansion procedure. These events can be easily clustered, visualized, and analyzed by urban planners. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our system using 7 weeks of anonymized and aggregated cellular location data in Dallas-Fort Worth. We suggest potential opportunities for urban planners and policy makers to use our methodology to make informed changes. These applications include real-time re-routing of traffic in response to abnormally high traffic, or identifying candidates for high-impact infrastructure projects.
  • Predicting ambulance demand accurately at a fine resolution in time and space (e.g., every hour and 1 km$^2$) is critical for staff / fleet management and dynamic deployment. There are several challenges: though the dataset is typically large-scale, demand per time period and locality is almost always zero. The demand arises from complex urban geography and exhibits complex spatio-temporal patterns, both of which need to captured and exploited. To address these challenges, we propose three methods based on Gaussian mixture models, kernel density estimation, and kernel warping. These methods provide spatio-temporal predictions for Toronto and Melbourne that are significantly more accurate than the current industry practice.
  • Predicting ambulance demand accurately in fine resolutions in space and time is critical for ambulance fleet management and dynamic deployment. Typical challenges include data sparsity at high resolutions and the need to respect complex urban spatial domains. To provide spatial density predictions for ambulance demand in Melbourne, Australia as it varies over hourly intervals, we propose a predictive spatio-temporal kernel warping method. To predict for each hour, we build a kernel density estimator on a sparse set of the most similar data from relevant past time periods (labeled data), but warp these kernels to a larger set of past data irregardless of time periods (point cloud). The point cloud represents the spatial structure and geographical characteristics of Melbourne, including complex boundaries, road networks, and neighborhoods. Borrowing from manifold learning, kernel warping is performed through a graph Laplacian of the point cloud and can be interpreted as a regularization towards, and a prior imposed, for spatial features. Kernel bandwidth and degree of warping are efficiently estimated via cross-validation, and can be made time- and/or location-specific. Our proposed model gives significantly more accurate predictions compared to a current industry practice, an unwarped kernel density estimation, and a time-varying Gaussian mixture model.
  • Predicting ambulance demand accurately at fine time and location scales is critical for ambulance fleet management and dynamic deployment. Large-scale datasets in this setting typically exhibit complex spatio-temporal dynamics and sparsity at high resolutions. We propose a predictive method using spatio-temporal kernel density estimation (stKDE) to address these challenges, and provide spatial density predictions for ambulance demand in Toronto, Canada as it varies over hourly intervals. Specifically, we weight the spatial kernel of each historical observation by its informativeness to the current predictive task. We construct spatio-temporal weight functions to incorporate various temporal and spatial patterns in ambulance demand, including location-specific seasonalities and short-term serial dependence. This allows us to draw out the most helpful historical data, and exploit spatio-temporal patterns in the data for accurate and fast predictions. We further provide efficient estimation and customizable prediction procedures. stKDE is easy to use and interpret by non-specialized personnel from the emergency medical service industry. It also has significantly higher statistical accuracy than the current industry practice, with a comparable amount of computational expense.
  • Ambulance demand estimation at fine time and location scales is critical for fleet management and dynamic deployment. We are motivated by the problem of estimating the spatial distribution of ambulance demand in Toronto, Canada, as it changes over discrete 2-hour intervals. This large-scale dataset is sparse at the desired temporal resolutions and exhibits location-specific serial dependence, daily and weekly seasonality. We address these challenges by introducing a novel characterization of time-varying Gaussian mixture models. We fix the mixture component distributions across all time periods to overcome data sparsity and accurately describe Toronto's spatial structure, while representing the complex spatio-temporal dynamics through time-varying mixture weights. We constrain the mixture weights to capture weekly seasonality, and apply a conditionally autoregressive prior on the mixture weights of each component to represent location-specific short-term serial dependence and daily seasonality. While estimation may be performed using a fixed number of mixture components, we also extend to estimate the number of components using birth-and-death Markov chain Monte Carlo. The proposed model is shown to give higher statistical predictive accuracy and to reduce the error in predicting EMS operational performance by as much as two-thirds compared to a typical industry practice.