• We report quantitative measurements of nanoscale permittivity and conductivity using tuning-fork (TF) based microwave impedance microscopy (MIM). The system is operated under the driving amplitude modulation mode, which ensures satisfactory feedback stability on samples with rough surfaces. The demodulated MIM signals on a series of bulk dielectrics are in good agreement with results simulated by finite-element analysis. Using the TF-MIM, we have visualized the evolution of nanoscale conductance on back-gated $MoS_2$ field effect transistors and the results are consistent with the transport data. Our work suggests that quantitative analysis of mesoscopic electrical properties can be achieved by near-field microwave imaging with small distance modulation.
  • The vicinity of a Mott insulating phase has constantly been a fertile ground for finding exotic quantum states, most notably the high Tc cuprates and colossal magnetoresistance manganites. The layered transition metal dichalcogenide 1T-TaS2 represents another intriguing example, in which the Mott insulator phase is intimately entangled with a series of complex charge-density-wave (CDW) orders. More interestingly, it has been recently found that 1T-TaS2 undergoes a Mott-insulator-to-superconductor transition induced by high pressure, charge doping, or isovalent substitution. The nature of the Mott insulator phase and transition mechanism to the conducting state is still under heated debate. Here, by combining scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements and first-principles calculations, we investigate the atomic scale electronic structure of 1T-TaS2 Mott insulator and its evolution to the metallic state upon isovalent substitution of S with Se. We identify two distinct types of orbital textures - one localized and the other extended - and demonstrates that the interplay between them is the key factor that determines the electronic structure. Especially, we show that the continuous evolution of the charge gap visualized by STM is due to the immersion of the localized-orbital-induced Hubbard bands into the extended-orbital-spanned Fermi sea, featuring a unique evolution from a Mott gap to a charge-transfer gap. This new mechanism of orbital-driven Mottness collapse revealed here suggests an interesting route for creating novel electronic state and designing future electronic devices.
  • One of the biggest puzzles concerning the cuprate high temperature superconductors is what determines the maximum transition temperature (Tc,max), which varies from less than 30 K to above 130 K in different compounds. Despite this dramatic variation, a robust trend is that within each family, the double-layer compound always has higher Tc,max than the single-layer counterpart. Here we use scanning tunneling microscopy to investigate the electronic structure of four cuprate parent compounds belonging to two different families. We find that within each family, the double layer compound has a much smaller charge transfer gap size ($\Delta_{CT}$), indicating a clear anticorrelation between $\Delta_{CT}$ and Tc,max. These results suggest that the charge transfer gap plays a key role in the superconducting physics of cuprates, which shed important new light on the high Tc mechanism from doped Mott insulator perspective.
  • A central question in the high temperature cuprate superconductors is the fate of the parent Mott insulator upon charge doping. Here we use scanning tunneling microscopy to investigate the local electronic structure of lightly doped cuprate in the antiferromagnetic insulating regime. We show that the doped charge induces a spectral weight transfer from the high energy Hubbard bands to the low energy in-gap states. With increasing doping, a V-shaped density of state suppression occurs at the Fermi level, which is accompanied by the emergence of checkerboard charge order. The new STM perspective revealed here is the cuprates first become a charge ordered insulator upon doping. Subsequently, with further doping, Fermi surface and high temperature superconductivity grow out of it.