• While influence maximization in social networks has been studied extensively in computer science community for the last decade the focus has been on the progressive influence models, such as independent cascade (IC) and Linear threshold (LT) models, which cannot capture the reversibility of choices. In this paper, we present the Heat Conduction (HC) model which is a non-progressive influence model with real-world interpretations. We show that HC unifies, generalizes, and extends the existing nonprogressive models, such as the Voter model [1] and non-progressive LT [2]. We then prove that selecting the optimal seed set of influential nodes is NP-hard for HC but by establishing the submodularity of influence spread, we can tackle the influence maximization problem with a scalable and provably near-optimal greedy algorithm. We are the first to present a scalable solution for influence maximization under nonprogressive LT model, as a special case of the HC model. In sharp contrast to the other greedy influence maximization methods, our fast and efficient C2GREEDY algorithm benefits from two analytically computable steps: closed-form computation for finding the influence spread as well as the greedy seed selection. Through extensive experiments on several large real and synthetic networks, we show that C2GREEDY outperforms the state-of-the-art methods, in terms of both influence spread and scalability.
  • We first present a comprehensive review of various random walk metrics used in the literature and express them in a consistent framework. We then introduce fundamental tensor -- a generalization of the well-known fundamental matrix -- and show that classical random walk metrics can be derived from it in a unified manner. We provide a collection of useful relations for random walk metrics that are useful and insightful for network studies. To demonstrate the usefulness and efficacy of the proposed fundamental tensor in network analysis, we present four important applications: 1) unification of network centrality measures, 2) characterization of (generalized) network articulation points, 3) identification of network most influential nodes, and 4) fast computation of network reachability after failures.
  • Directed links -- representing asymmetric social ties or interactions (e.g., "follower-followee") -- arise naturally in many social networks and other complex networks, giving rise to directed graphs (or digraphs) as basic topological models for these networks. Reciprocity, defined for a digraph as the percentage of edges with a reciprocal edge, is a key metric that has been used in the literature to compare different directed networks and provide "hints" about their structural properties: for example, are reciprocal edges generated randomly by chance or are there other processes driving their generation? In this paper we study the problem of maximizing achievable reciprocity for an ensemble of digraphs with the same prescribed in- and out-degree sequences. We show that the maximum reciprocity hinges crucially on the in- and out-degree sequences, which may be intuitively interpreted as constraints on some "social capacities" of nodes and impose fundamental limits on achievable reciprocity. We show that it is NP-complete to decide the achievability of a simple upper bound on maximum reciprocity, and provide conditions for achieving it. We demonstrate that many real networks exhibit reciprocities surprisingly close to the upper bound, which implies that users in these social networks are in a sense more "social" than suggested by the empirical reciprocity alone in that they are more willing to reciprocate, subject to their "social capacity" constraints. We find some surprising linear relationships between empirical reciprocity and the bound. We also show that a particular type of small network motifs that we call 3-paths are the major source of loss in reciprocity for real networks.
  • A divide-and-conquer based approach for computing the Moore-Penrose pseudo-inverse of the combinatorial Laplacian matrix $(\bb L^+)$ of a simple, undirected graph is proposed. % The nature of the underlying sub-problems is studied in detail by means of an elegant interplay between $\bb L^+$ and the effective resistance distance $(\Omega)$. Closed forms are provided for a novel {\em two-stage} process that helps compute the pseudo-inverse incrementally. Analogous scalar forms are obtained for the converse case, that of structural regress, which entails the breaking up of a graph into disjoint components through successive edge deletions. The scalar forms in both cases, show absolute element-wise independence at all stages, thus suggesting potential parallelizability. Analytical and experimental results are presented for dynamic (time-evolving) graphs as well as large graphs in general (representing real-world networks). An order of magnitude reduction in computational time is achieved for dynamic graphs; while in the general case, our approach performs better in practice than the standard methods, even though the worst case theoretical complexities may remain the same: an important contribution with consequences to the study of online social networks.
  • Influence diffusion and influence maximization in large-scale online social networks (OSNs) have been extensively studied, because of their impacts on enabling effective online viral marketing. Existing studies focus on social networks with only friendship relations, whereas the foe or enemy relations that commonly exist in many OSNs, e.g., Epinions and Slashdot, are completely ignored. In this paper, we make the first attempt to investigate the influence diffusion and influence maximization in OSNs with both friend and foe relations, which are modeled using positive and negative edges on signed networks. In particular, we extend the classic voter model to signed networks and analyze the dynamics of influence diffusion of two opposite opinions. We first provide systematic characterization of both short-term and long-term dynamics of influence diffusion in this model, and illustrate that the steady state behaviors of the dynamics depend on three types of graph structures, which we refer to as balanced graphs, anti-balanced graphs, and strictly unbalanced graphs. We then apply our results to solve the influence maximization problem and develop efficient algorithms to select initial seeds of one opinion that maximize either its short-term influence coverage or long-term steady state influence coverage. Extensive simulation results on both synthetic and real-world networks, such as Epinions and Slashdot, confirm our theoretical analysis on influence diffusion dynamics, and demonstrate the efficacy of our influence maximization algorithm over other heuristic algorithms.
  • We explore the geometry of complex networks in terms of an n-dimensional Euclidean embedding represented by the Moore-Penrose pseudo-inverse of the graph Laplacian $(\bb L^+)$. The squared distance of a node $i$ to the origin in this n-dimensional space $(l^+_{ii})$, yields a topological centrality index $(\mathcal{C}^{*}(i) = 1/l^+_{ii})$ for node $i$. In turn, the sum of reciprocals of individual node structural centralities, $\sum_{i}1/\mathcal{C}^*(i) = \sum_{i} l^+_{ii}$, i.e. the trace of $\bb L^+$, yields the well-known Kirchhoff index $(\mathcal{K})$, an overall structural descriptor for the network. In addition to this geometric interpretation, we provide alternative interpretations of the proposed indices to reveal their true topological characteristics: first, in terms of forced detour overheads and frequency of recurrences in random walks that has an interesting analogy to voltage distributions in the equivalent electrical network; and then as the average connectedness of $i$ in all the bi-partitions of the graph. These interpretations respectively help establish the topological centrality $(\mathcal{C}^{*}(i))$ of node $i$ as a measure of its overall position as well as its overall connectedness in the network; thus reflecting the robustness of node $i$ to random multiple edge failures. Through empirical evaluations using synthetic and real world networks, we demonstrate how the topological centrality is better able to distinguish nodes in terms of their structural roles in the network and, along with Kirchhoff index, is appropriately sensitive to perturbations/rewirings in the network.
  • Many social networks, e.g., Slashdot and Twitter, can be represented as directed graphs (digraphs) with two types of links between entities: mutual (bi-directional) and one-way (uni-directional) connections. Social science theories reveal that mutual connections are more stable than one-way connections, and one-way connections exhibit various tendencies to become mutual connections. It is therefore important to take such tendencies into account when performing clustering of social networks with both mutual and one-way connections. In this paper, we utilize the dyadic methods to analyze social networks, and develop a generalized mutuality tendency theory to capture the tendencies of those node pairs which tend to establish mutual connections more frequently than those occur by chance. Using these results, we develop a mutuality-tendency-aware spectral clustering algorithm to identify more stable clusters by maximizing the within-cluster mutuality tendency and minimizing the cross-cluster mutuality tendency. Extensive simulation results on synthetic datasets as well as real online social network datasets such as Slashdot, demonstrate that our proposed mutuality-tendency-aware spectral clustering algorithm extracts more stable social community structures than traditional spectral clustering methods.