• Collective measurements on identically prepared quantum systems can extract more information than local measurements, thereby enhancing information-processing efficiency. Although this nonclassical phenomenon has been known for two decades, it has remained a challenging task to demonstrate the advantage of collective measurements in experiments. Here we introduce a general recipe for performing deterministic collective measurements on two identically prepared qubits based on quantum walks. Using photonic quantum walks, we realize experimentally an optimized collective measurement with fidelity 0.9946 without post selection. As an application, we achieve the highest tomographic efficiency in qubit state tomography to date. Our work offers an effective recipe for beating the precision limit of local measurements in quantum state tomography and metrology. In addition, our study opens an avenue for harvesting the power of collective measurements in quantum information processing and for exploring the intriguing physics behind this power.
  • Wave-particle duality is a typical example of Bohr's complementarity principle that plays a significant role in quantum mechanics. Previous studies used the visibility of an interference pattern to quantify the wave property and used path information to quantify the particle property. However, coherence is the core and basis of the interference phenomenon. If we could use coherence to characterize the wave property, the understanding of wave-particle duality would be strengthened. A recent theoretical work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 160406 (2016)] found two relations between quantum coherence and path information. Here, we demonstrate the new measure of wave-particle duality based on two kinds of coherence measures quantitatively for the first time. The wave property, quantified by the coherence in the l1-norm measure and the relative entropy measure, can be obtained via tomography of the target state, which is encoded in the path degree of freedom of the photons. The particle property, quantified by the path information, can be obtained via the discrimination of detector states, which is encoded in the polarization degree of freedom of the photons. Our work may deepen people's understanding of coherence and provide a new perspective regarding wave-particle duality.
  • Quantum resource theories seek to quantify sources of non-classicality that bestow quantum technologies their operational advantage. Chief among these are studies of quantum correlations and quantum coherence. The former to isolate non-classicality in the correlations between systems, the latter to capture non-classicality of quantum superpositions within a single physical system. Here we present a scheme that cyclically inter-converts between these resources without loss. The first stage converts coherence present in an input system into correlations with an ancilla. The second stage harnesses these correlations to restore coherence on the input system by measurement of the ancilla. We experimentally demonstrate this inter-conversion process using linear optics. Our experiment highlights the connection between non-classicality of correlations and non-classicality within local quantum systems, and provides potential flexibilities in exploiting one resource to perform tasks normally associated with the other.
  • The identification of an unknown quantum gate is a significant issue in quantum technology. In this paper, we propose a quantum gate identification method within the framework of quantum process tomography. In this method, a series of pure states are inputted to the gate and then a fast state tomography on the output states is performed and the data are used to reconstruct the quantum gate. Our algorithm has computational complexity $O(d^3)$ with the system dimension $d$. The algorithm is compared with maximum likelihood estimation method for the running time, which shows the efficiency advantage of our method. An error upper bound is established for the identification algorithm and the robustness of the algorithm against the purity of input states is also tested. We perform quantum optical experiment on single-qubit Hadamard gate to verify the effectiveness of the identification algorithm.
  • We experimentally demonstrate that tomographic measurements can be performed for states of qubits before they are prepared. A variant of the quantum teleportation protocol is used as a channel between two instants in time, allowing measurements for polarisation states of photons to be implemented 88 ns before they are created. Measurement data taken at the early time and later unscrambled according to the results of the protocol's Bell measurements, produces density matrices with an average fidelity of $0.90 \pm 0.01$ against the ideal states of photons created at the later time. Process tomography of the time-reverse quantum channel finds an average process fidelity of $0.84 \pm 0.02$. While our proof-of-principle implementation necessitates some post-selection, the general protocol is deterministic and requires no post-selection to sift desired states and reject a larger ensemble.
  • Quantum coherence, which quantifies the superposition properties of a quantum state, plays an indispensable role in quantum resource theory. A recent theoretical work [Phys. Rev. Lett. \textbf{116}, 070402 (2016)] studied the manipulation of quantum coherence in bipartite or multipartite systems under the protocol Local Incoherent Operation and Classical Communication (LQICC). Here we present the first experimental realization of obtaining maximal coherence in assisted distillation protocol based on linear optical system. The results of our work show that the optimal distillable coherence rate can be reached even in one-copy scenario when the overall bipartite qubit state is pure. Moreover, the experiments for mixed states showed that distillable coherence can be increased with less demand than entanglement distillation. Our work might be helpful in the remote quantum information processing and quantum control.
  • Full quantum state tomography (FQST) plays a unique role in the estimation of the state of a quantum system without \emph{a priori} knowledge or assumptions. Unfortunately, since FQST requires informationally (over)complete measurements, both the number of measurement bases and the computational complexity of data processing suffer an exponential growth with the size of the quantum system. A 14-qubit entangled state has already been experimentally prepared in an ion trap, and the data processing capability for FQST of a 14-qubit state seems to be far away from practical applications. In this paper, the computational capability of FQST is pushed forward to reconstruct a 14-qubit state with a run time of only 3.35 hours using the linear regression estimation (LRE) algorithm, even when informationally overcomplete Pauli measurements are employed. The computational complexity of the LRE algorithm is first reduced from $O(10^{19})$ to $O(10^{15})$ for a 14-qubit state, by dropping all the zero elements, and its computational efficiency is further sped up by fully exploiting the parallelism of the LRE algorithm with parallel Graphic Processing Unit (GPU) programming. Our result can play an important role in quantum information technologies with large quantum systems.
  • We consider the problem of implementing mutually unbiased bases (MUB) for a polarization qubit with only one wave plate, the minimum number of wave plates. We show that one wave plate is sufficient to realize two MUB as long as its phase shift (modulo $360^\circ$) ranges between $45^\circ$ and $315^\circ$. {It can realize} three MUB (a complete set of MUB for a qubit) if the phase shift of the wave plate is within $[111.5^\circ, 141.7^\circ]$ or its symmetric range with respect to 180$^\circ$. The systematic error of the realized MUB using a third-wave plate (TWP) with $120^\circ$ phase is calculated to be a half of that using the combination of a quarter-wave plate (QWP) and a half-wave plate (HWP). As experimental applications, TWPs are used in single-qubit and two-qubit quantum state tomography experiments and the results show a systematic error reduction by $50\%$. This technique not only saves one wave plate but also reduces the systematic error, which can be applied to quantum state tomography and other applications involving MUB. The proposed TWP may become a useful instrument in optical experiments, replacing multiple elements like QWP and HWP.
  • The precision limit in quantum state tomography is of great interest not only to practical applications but also to foundational studies. However, little is known about this subject in the multiparameter setting even theoretically due to the subtle information tradeoff among incompatible observables. In the case of a qubit, the theoretic precision limit was determined by Hayashi as well as Gill and Massar, but attaining the precision limit in experiments has remained a challenging task. Here we report the first experiment which achieves this precision limit in adaptive quantum state tomography on optical polarization qubits. The two-step adaptive strategy employed in our experiment is very easy to implement in practice. Yet it is surprisingly powerful in optimizing most figures of merit of practical interest. Our study may have significant implications for multiparameter quantum estimation problems, such as quantum metrology. Meanwhile, it may promote our understanding about the complementarity principle and uncertainty relations from the information theoretic perspective.
  • Adaptive techniques have important potential for wide applications in enhancing precision of quantum parameter estimation. We present a recursively adaptive quantum state tomography (RAQST) protocol for finite dimensional quantum systems and experimentally implement the adaptive tomography protocol on two-qubit systems. In this RAQST protocol, an adaptive measurement strategy and a recursive linear regression estimation algorithm are performed. Numerical results show that our RAQST protocol can outperform the tomography protocols using mutually unbiased bases (MUB) and the two-stage MUB adaptive strategy even with the simplest product measurements. When nonlocal measurements are available, our RAQST can beat the Gill-Massar bound for a wide range of quantum states with a modest number of copies. We use only the simplest product measurements to implement two-qubit tomography experiments. In the experiments, we use error-compensation techniques to tackle systematic error due to misalignments and imperfection of wave plates, and achieve about 100-fold reduction of the systematic error. The experimental results demonstrate that the improvement of RAQST over nonadaptive tomography is significant for states with a high level of purity. Our results also show that this recursively adaptive tomography method is particularly effective for the reconstruction of maximally entangled states, which are important resources in quantum information.
  • Systematic errors are inevitable in most measurements performed in real life because of imperfect measurement devices. Reducing systematic errors is crucial to ensuring the accuracy and reliability of measurement results. To this end, delicate error-compensation design is often necessary in addition to device calibration to reduce the dependence of the systematic error on the imperfection of the devices. The art of error-compensation design is well appreciated in nuclear magnetic resonance system by using composite pulses. In contrast, there are few works on reducing systematic errors in quantum optical systems. Here we propose an error-compensation design to reduce the systematic error in projective measurements on a polarization qubit. It can reduce the systematic error to the second order of the phase errors of both the half-wave plate (HWP) and the quarter-wave plate (QWP) as well as the angle error of the HWP. This technique is then applied to experiments on quantum state tomography on polarization qubits, leading to a 20-fold reduction in the systematic error. Our study may find applications in high-precision tasks in polarization optics and quantum optics.
  • A simple yet efficient method of linear regression estimation (LRE) is presented for quantum state tomography. In this method, quantum state reconstruction is converted into a parameter estimation problem of a linear regression model and the least-squares method is employed to estimate the unknown parameters. The asymptotic mean squared error (MSE) bound of the estimate can be given analytically, which can guide one to choose optimal measurement sets. The LRE is asymptotically optimal in the sense that the MSE may achieve the Cram\'{e}r-Rao bound asymptotically. The computational complexity of LRE is O(d^4), where d is the dimension of the quantum state. Numerical examples show that LRE is much faster than maximum-likelihood estimation for quantum state tomography.