• Topological orders are a class of exotic states of matter characterized by patterns of long-range entanglement. Certain topologically ordered systems are proposed as potential realization of fault-tolerant quantum computation. Topological orders can arise in two-dimensional spin-lattice models. In this paper, we engineer a time-dependent Hamiltonian to prepare a topologically ordered state through adiabatic evolution. The other sectors in the degenerate ground-state space of the model are obtained by applying nontrivial operations corresponding to closed string operators. Each sector is highly entangled, as shown from the completely reconstructed density matrices. This paves the way towards exploring the properties of topological orders and the application of topological orders in topological quantum memory.
  • Processing of digital images is continuously gaining in volume and relevance, with concomitant demands on data storage, transmission and processing power. Encoding the image information in quantum-mechanical systems instead of classical ones and replacing classical with quantum information processing may alleviate some of these challenges. By encoding and processing the image information in quantum-mechanical systems, we here demonstrate the framework of quantum image processing, where a pure quantum state encodes the image information: we encode the pixel values in the probability amplitudes and the pixel positions in the computational basis states. Our quantum image representation reduces the required number of qubits compared to existing implementations, and we present image processing algorithms that provide exponential speed-up over their classical counterparts. For the commonly used task of detecting the edge of an image, we propose and implement a quantum algorithm that completes the task with only one single-qubit operation, independent of the size of the image. This demonstrates the potential of quantum image processing for highly efficient image and video processing in the big data era.
  • As of today, no one can tell when a universal quantum computer with thousands of logical quantum bits (qubits) will be built. At present, most quantum computer prototypes involve less than ten individually controllable qubits, and only exist in laboratories for the sake of either the great costs of devices or professional maintenance requirements. Moreover, scientists believe that quantum computers will never replace our daily, every-minute use of classical computers, but would rather serve as a substantial addition to the classical ones when tackling some particular problems. Due to the above two reasons, cloud-based quantum computing is anticipated to be the most useful and reachable form for public users to experience with the power of quantum. As initial attempts, IBM Q has launched influential cloud services on a superconducting quantum processor in 2016, but no other platforms has followed up yet. Here, we report our new cloud quantum computing service -- NMRCloudQ (http://nmrcloudq.com/zh-hans/), where nuclear magnetic resonance, one of the pioneer platforms with mature techniques in experimental quantum computing, plays as the role of implementing computing tasks. Our service provides a comprehensive software environment preconfigured with a list of quantum information processing packages, and aims to be freely accessible to either amateurs that look forward to keeping pace with this quantum era or professionals that are interested in carrying out real quantum computing experiments in person. In our current version, four qubits are already usable with in average 1.26% single-qubit gate error rate and 1.77% two-qubit controlled-NOT gate error rate via randomized benchmaking tests. Improved control precisions as well as a new seven-qubit processor are also in preparation and will be available later.
  • The modern conception of phases of matter has undergone tremendous developments since the first observation of topologically ordered states in fractional quantum Hall systems in the 1980s. In this paper, we explore the question: How much detail of the physics of topological orders can in principle be observed using state of the art technologies? We find that using surprisingly little data, namely the toric code Hamiltonian in the presence of generic disorders and detuning from its exactly solvable point, the modular matrices -- characterizing anyonic statistics that are some of the most fundamental finger prints of topological orders -- can be reconstructed with very good accuracy solely by experimental means. This is a first experimental realization of these fundamental signatures of a topological order, a test of their robustness against perturbations, and a proof of principle -- that current technologies have attained the precision to identify phases of matter and, as such, probe an extended region of phase space around the soluble point before its breakdown. Given the special role of anyonic statistics in quantum computation, our work promises myriad applications both in probing and realistically harnessing these exotic phases of matter.
  • Quantum state tomography is an indispensable but costly part of many quantum experiments. Typically, it requires measurements to be carried in a number of different settings on a fixed experimental setup. The collected data is often informationally overcomplete, with the amount of information redundancy depending on the particular set of measurement settings chosen. This raises a question about how should one optimally take data so that the number of measurement settings necessary can be reduced. Here, we cast this problem in terms of integer programming. For a given experimental setup, standard integer programming algorithms allow us to find the minimum set of readout operations that can realize a target tomographic task. We apply the method to certain basic and practical state tomographic problems in nuclear magnetic resonance experimental systems. The results show that, considerably less readout operations can be found using our technique than it was by using the previous greedy search strategy. Therefore, our method could be helpful for simplifying measurement schemes so as to minimize the experimental effort.
  • Topologically ordered phase has emerged as one of most exciting concepts that not only broadens our understanding of phases of matter, but also has been found to have potential application in fault-tolerant quantum computation. The direct measurement of topological properties, however, is still a challenge especially in interacting quantum system. Here we realize one-dimensional Heisenberg spin chains using nuclear magnetic resonance simulators and observe the interaction-induced topological transitions, where Berry curvature in the parameter space of Hamiltonian is probed by means of dynamical response and then the first Chern number is extracted by integrating the curvature over the closed surface. The utilized experimental method provides a powerful means to explore topological phenomena in quantum systems with many-body interactions.
  • Precisely characterizing and controlling realistic open quantum systems is one of the most challenging and exciting frontiers in quantum sciences and technologies. In this Letter, we present methods of approximately computing reachable sets for coherently controlled dissipative systems, which is very useful for assessing control performances. We apply this to a two-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance spin system and implement some tasks of quantum control in open systems at a near optimal performance in view of purity: e.g., increasing polarization and preparing pseudo-pure states. Our work shows interesting and promising applications of environment-assisted quantum dynamics.
  • Topological orders are exotic phases of matter existing in strongly correlated quantum systems, which are beyond the usual symmetry description and cannot be distinguished by local order parameters. Here we report an experimental quantum simulation of the Wen-plaquette spin model with different topological orders in a nuclear magnetic resonance system, and observe the adiabatic transition between two $Z_2$ topological orders through a spin-polarized phase by measuring the nonlocal closed-string (Wilson loop) operator. Moreover, we also measure the entanglement properties of the topological orders. This work confirms the adiabatic method for preparing topologically ordered states and provides an experimental tool for further studies of complex quantum systems.