• Recent developments in the relationship between bulk topology and surface crystal symmetry have led to the discovery of materials whose gapless surface states are protected by crystal symmetries. In fact, there exists only a very limited set of possible surface crystal symmetries, captured by the 17 "wallpaper groups." We show that a consideration of symmetry-allowed band degeneracies in the wallpaper groups can be used to understand previous topological crystalline insulators, as well as to predict new examples. In particular, the two wallpaper groups with multiple glide lines, $pgg$ and $p4g$, allow for a new topological insulating phase, whose surface spectrum consists of only a single, fourfold-degenerate, true Dirac fermion. Like the surface state of a conventional topological insulator, the surface Dirac fermion in this "nonsymmorphic Dirac insulator" provides a theoretical exception to a fermion doubling theorem. Unlike the surface state of a conventional topological insulator, it can be gapped into topologically distinct surface regions while keeping time-reversal symmetry, allowing for networks of topological surface quantum spin Hall domain walls. We report the theoretical discovery of new topological crystalline phases in the A$_2$B$_3$ family of materials in SG 127, finding that Sr$_2$Pb$_3$ hosts this new topological surface Dirac fermion. Furthermore, (100)-strained Au$_2$Y$_3$ and Hg$_2$Sr$_3$ host related topological surface hourglass fermions. We also report the presence of this new topological hourglass phase in Ba$_5$In$_2$Sb$_6$ in SG 55. For orthorhombic space groups with two glides, we catalog all possible bulk topological phases by a consideration of the allowed non-abelian Wilson loop connectivities, and we develop topological invariants for these systems. Finally, we show how in a particular limit, these crystalline phases reduce to copies of the SSH model.
  • Three-dimensional topological (crystalline) insulators are materials with an insulating bulk, but conducting surface states which are topologically protected by time-reversal (or spatial) symmetries. Here, we extend the notion of three-dimensional topological insulators to systems that host no gapless surface states, but exhibit topologically protected gapless hinge states. Their topological character is protected by spatio-temporal symmetries, of which we present two cases: (1) Chiral higher-order topological insulators protected by the combination of time-reversal and a four-fold rotation symmetry. Their hinge states are chiral modes and the bulk topology is $\mathbb{Z}_2$-classified. (2) Helical higher-order topological insulators protected by time-reversal and mirror symmetries. Their hinge states come in Kramers pairs and the bulk topology is $\mathbb{Z}$-classified. We provide the topological invariants for both cases. Furthermore we show that SnTe as well as surface-modified Bi$_2$TeI, BiSe, and BiTe are helical higher-order topological insulators and propose a realistic experimental setup to detect the hinge states.
  • Topological superconductors, whose edge hosts Majorana bound states or Majorana fermions that obey non-Abelian statistics, can be used for low-decoherence quantum computations. Most of the proposed topological superconductors are realized with spin-helical states through proximity effect to BCS superconductors. However, such approaches are difficult for further studies and applications because of the low transition temperatures and complicated hetero-structures. Here by using high-resolution spin-resolved and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, we discover that the iron-based superconductor FeTe1-xSex (x = 0.45, Tc = 14.5 K) hosts Dirac-cone type spin-helical surface states at Fermi level, which open an s-wave SC gap below Tc. Our study proves that the surface states of FeTe0.55Se0.45 are 2D topologically superconducting, and thus provides a simple and possibly high-Tc platform for realizing Majorana fermions.
  • Topological Dirac semimetals (TDSs) exhibit bulk Dirac cones protected by time reversal and crystal symmetry, as well as surface states originating from non-trivial topology. While there is a manifold possible onset of superconducting order in such systems, few observations of intrinsic superconductivity have so far been reported for TDSs. We observe evidence for a TDS phase in FeTe$_{1-x}$Se$_x$ ($x$ = 0.45), one of the high transition temperature ($T_c$) iron-based superconductors. In angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) and transport experiments, we find spin-polarized states overlapping with the bulk states on the (001) surface, and linear magnetoresistance (MR) starting from 6 T. Combined, this strongly suggests the existence of a TDS phase, which is confirmed by theoretical calculations. In total, the topological electronic states in Fe(Te,Se) provide a promising high $T_c$ platform to realize multiple topological superconducting phases.
  • The mathematical field of topology has become a framework to describe the low-energy electronic structure of crystalline solids. A typical feature of a bulk insulating three-dimensional topological crystal are conducting two-dimensional surface states. This constitutes the topological bulk-boundary correspondence. Here, we establish that the electronic structure of bismuth, an element consistently described as bulk topologically trivial, is in fact topological and follows a generalized bulk-boundary correspondence of higher-order: not the surfaces of the crystal, but its hinges host topologically protected conducting modes. These hinge modes are protected against localization by time-reversal symmetry locally, and globally by the three-fold rotational symmetry and inversion symmetry of the bismuth crystal. We support our claim theoretically and experimentally. Our theoretical analysis is based on symmetry arguments, topological indices, first-principle calculations, and the recently introduced framework of topological quantum chemistry. We provide supporting evidence from two complementary experimental techniques. With scanning-tunneling spectroscopy, we probe the unique signatures of the rotational symmetry of the one-dimensional states located at step edges of the crystal surface. With Josephson interferometry, we demonstrate their universal topological contribution to the electronic transport. Our work establishes bismuth as a higher-order topological insulator.
  • The conventional theory of solids is well suited to describing band structures locally near isolated points in momentum space, but struggles to capture the full, global picture necessary for understanding topological phenomena. In part of a recent paper [B. Bradlyn et al., Nature 547, 298 (2017)], we have introduced the way to overcome this difficulty by formulating the problem of sewing together many disconnected local "k-dot-p" band structures across the Brillouin zone in terms of graph theory. In the current manuscript we give the details of our full theoretical construction. We show that crystal symmetries strongly constrain the allowed connectivities of energy bands, and we employ graph-theoretic techniques such as graph connectivity to enumerate all the solutions to these constraints. The tools of graph theory allow us to identify disconnected groups of bands in these solutions, and so identify topologically distinct insulating phases.
  • The link between chemical orbitals described by local degrees of freedom and band theory, which is defined in momentum space, was proposed by Zak several decades ago for spinless systems with and without time-reversal in his theory of "elementary" band representations. In Nature 547, 298-305 (2017), we introduced the generalization of this theory to the experimentally relevant situation of spin-orbit coupled systems with time-reversal symmetry and proved that all bands that do not transform as band representations are topological. Here, we give the full details of this construction. We prove that elementary band representations are either connected as bands in the Brillouin zone and are described by localized Wannier orbitals respecting the symmetries of the lattice (including time-reversal when applicable), or, if disconnected, describe topological insulators. We then show how to generate a band representation from a particular Wyckoff position and determine which Wyckoff positions generate elementary band representations for all space groups. This theory applies to spinful and spinless systems, in all dimensions, with and without time reversal. We introduce a homotopic notion of equivalence and show that it results in a finer classification of topological phases than approaches based only on the symmetry of wavefunctions at special points in the Brillouin zone. Utilizing a mapping of the band connectivity into a graph theory problem, which we introduced in Nature 547, 298-305 (2017), we show in companion papers which Wyckoff positions can generate disconnected elementary band representations, furnishing a natural avenue for a systematic materials search.
  • One-dimensional topological superconductors host Majorana zero modes (MZMs), the non-local property of which could be exploited for quantum computing applications. Spin- polarized scanning tunneling microscopy measurements show that MZMs realized in self- assembled Fe chains on the surface of Pb have a spin polarization that exceeds that due to the magnetism of these chains. This feature, captured by our model calculations, is a direct consequence of the nonlocality of the Hilbert space of MZMs emerging from a topological band structure. Our study establishes spin polarization measurements as a diagnostic tool to uniquely distinguish topological MZMs from trivial in-gap states of a superconductor.
  • A new section of databases and programs devoted to double crystallographic groups (point and space groups) has been implemented in the Bilbao Crystallographic Server (http://www.cryst.ehu.es). The double crystallographic groups are required in the study of physical systems whose Hamiltonian includes spin-dependent terms. In the symmetry analysis of such systems, instead of the irreducible representations of the space groups, it is necessary to consider the single- and double-valued irreducible representations of the double space groups. The new section includes databases of symmetry operations (DGENPOS) and of irreducible representations of the double (point and space) groups (REPRESENTATIONS DPG and REPRESENTATIONS DSG). The tool DCOMPATIBILITY RELATIONS provides compatibility relations between the irreducible representations of double space groups at different k-vectors of the Brillouin zone when there is a group-subgroup relation between the corresponding little groups. The program DSITESYM implements the so-called site-symmetry approach, which establishes symmetry relations between localized and extended crystal states, using representations of the double groups. As an application of this approach, the program BANDREP calculates the band representations and the elementary band representations induced from any Wyckoff position of any of the 230 double space groups, giving information about the properties of these bands. Recently, the results of BANDREP have been extensively applied in the description and the search of topological insulators.
  • Topological phases of noninteracting particles are distinguished by global properties of their band structure and eigenfunctions in momentum space. On the other hand, group theory as conventionally applied to solid-state physics focuses only on properties which are local (at high symmetry points, lines, and planes) in the Brillouin zone. To bridge this gap, we have previously [B. Bradlyn et al., Nature 547, 298--305 (2017)] mapped the problem of constructing global band structures out of local data to a graph construction problem. In this paper, we provide the explicit data and formulate the necessary algorithms to produce all topologically distinct graphs. Furthermore, we show how to apply these algorithms to certain "elementary" band structures highlighted in the aforementioned reference, and so identified and tabulated all orbital types and lattices that can give rise to topologically disconnected band structures. Finally, we show how to use the newly developed BANDREP program on the Bilbao Crystallographic Server to access the results of our computation.
  • The past decade's apparent success in predicting and experimentally discovering distinct classes of topological insulators (TIs) and semimetals masks a fundamental shortcoming: out of 200,000 stoichiometric compounds extant in material databases, only several hundred of them are topologically nontrivial. Are TIs that esoteric, or does this reflect a fundamental problem with the current piecemeal approach to finding them? To address this, we propose a new and complete electronic band theory that highlights the link between topology and local chemical bonding, and combines this with the conventional band theory of electrons. Topological Quantum Chemistry is a description of the universal global properties of all possible band structures and materials, comprised of a graph theoretical description of momentum space and a dual group theoretical description in real space. We classify the possible band structures for all 230 crystal symmetry groups that arise from local atomic orbitals, and show which are topologically nontrivial. We show how our topological band theory sheds new light on known TIs, and demonstrate the power of our method to predict a plethora of new TIs.
  • Weyl fermions can be created in materials with both time reversal and inversion symmetry by applying a magnetic field, as evidenced by recent measurements of anomalous negative magnetoresistance. Here, we do a thorough analysis of the Weyl points in these materials: by enforcing crystal symmetries, we classify the location and monopole charges of Weyl points created by fields aligned with high-symmetry axes. The analysis applies generally to materials with band inversion in the $T_d$, $D_{4h}$ and $D_{6h}$ point groups. For the $T_d$ point group, we find that Weyl nodes persist for all directions of the magnetic field. Further, we compute the anomalous magnetoresistance of field-created Weyl fermions in the semiclassical regime. We find that the magnetoresistance can scale non-quadratically with magnetic field, in contrast to materials with intrinsic Weyl nodes. Our results are relevant to future experiments in the semi-classical regime.
  • A long controversy of ice lensing exists in the research of frost heave. By elucidating the mechanical and thermodynamics equilibria at the interface, we present the thermodynamics of the water/ice interface from macroscale to microscale for the freezing of colloidal suspensions. The application of the Clapeyron equation is confirmed both at macroscale to microscale via curvature effect. The thermodynamics at the interface indicates the initial of ice lensing/banding from the growth of pore ice, determined by the critical curvature undercooling instead of the critical fracture of frozen fringe. It is also proposed that the packing status of the porous structure in the particle layer ahead of the water/ice interface determines the ice lensing behaviors. The results presented here are different scenarios from previous investigations of freezing colloidal suspensions, and may shed light on the researches of this area.
  • The particle motion equation in the Radio Frequency (RF) quadrupole is derived. The motion equation shows that the general transform matrix of RF quadrupole with length less than or equal to 0.5b*l (b is the relativistic velocity of particles and l is wavelength of radio frequency electromagnetic field) can describe the particle motion in arbitrary long RF quadrupole. By iterative integration, the general transform matrix of discrete RF quadrupole is derived from the motion equation. The transform matrix is in form of power series of focusing parameter B. It shows that for length less than b*l, the series up to 2nd order of B agrees well with the direct integration results for B up to 30, while for length less than 0.5b*l, the series up to 1st order is a good approximation of the real solution for B less than 30 already. The formula of the transform matrix can be integrated into the linac or beam line design code to deal with the focusing of the discrete RF quadrupole.
  • In the field of freezing colloidal suspensions, it is important to understand the particle-scale behavior of particle packing. Here, we reveal the dynamics of particle packing by identifying the behavior of each single particle in situ. The typical pattern consists of locally ordered clusters and amorphous defects. The microscopic mechanism of pattern formation is ascribed to the non-equilibrium particle-packing process on the particle scale, described with the P\'eclet number. The macroscopic migration of a particle layer is also revealed by an analytical model involving parameters of freezing speed and initial volume fraction of particles.
  • Weyl fermions have recently been observed in several time-reversal-invariant semimetals and photonics materials with broken inversion symmetry. These systems are expected to have exotic transport properties such as the chiral anomaly. However, most discovered Weyl materials possess a substantial number of Weyl nodes close to the Fermi level that give rise to complicated transport properties. Here we predict, for the first time, a new family of Weyl systems defined by broken time-reversal symmetry, namely, Co-based magnetic Heusler materials XCo2Z (X = IVB or VB; Z = IVA or IIIA). To search for Weyl fermions in the centrosymmetric magnetic systems, we recall an easy and practical inversion invariant, which has been calculated to be -1, guaranteeing the existence of an odd number of pairs of Weyl fermions. These materials exhibit, when alloyed, only two Weyl nodes at the Fermi level - the minimum number possible in a condensed matter system. The Weyl nodes are protected by the rotational symmetry along the magnetic axis and separated by a large distance (of order 2$\pi$) in the Brillouin zone. The corresponding Fermi arcs have been calculated as well. This discovery provides a realistic and promising platform for manipulating and studying the magnetic Weyl physics in experiments.
  • Ordered assemblies of magnetic atoms on the surface of conventional superconductors can be used to engineer topological superconducting phases and realize Majorana fermion quasiparticles (MQPs) in a condensed matter setting. Recent experiments have shown that chains of Fe atoms on Pb generically have the required electronic characteristics to form a 1D topological superconductor and have revealed spatially resolved signatures of localized MQPs at the ends of such chains. Here we report higher resolution measurements of the same atomic chain system performed using a dilution refrigerator scanning tunneling microscope (STM). With significantly better energy resolution than previous studies, we show that the zero bias peak (ZBP) in Fe chains has no detectable splitting from hybridization with other states. The measurements also reveal that the ZBP exhibits a distinctive 'double eye' spatial pattern on nanometer length scales. Theoretically we show that this is a general consequence of STM measurements of MQPs with substantial spectral weight in the superconducting substrate, a conclusion further supported by measurements of Pb overlayers deposited on top of the Fe chains. Finally, we report experiments performed with superconducting tips in search of the particle-hole symmetric MQP signature expected in such measurements.
  • Following the intense studies on topological insulators, significant efforts have recently been devoted to the search for gapless topological systems. These materials not only broaden the topological classification of matter but also provide a condensed matter realization of various relativistic particles and phenomena previously discussed mainly in high energy physics. Weyl semimetals host massless, chiral, low-energy excitations in the bulk electronic band structure, whereas a symmetry protected pair of Weyl fermions gives rise to massless Dirac fermions. We employed scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy to explore the behavior of electronic states both on the surface and in the bulk of topological semimetal phases. By mapping the quasiparticle interference and emerging Landau levels at high magnetic field in Dirac semimetals Cd$_3$As$_2$ and Na$_3$Bi, we observed extended Dirac-like bulk electronic bands. Quasiparticle interference imaged on Weyl semimetal TaAs demonstrated the predicted momentum dependent delocalization of Fermi arc surface states in the vicinity of the surface-projected Weyl nodes.
  • Based on the ab initio calculations, we show that MoTe2, in its low-temperature orthorhombic structure characterized by an X-ray diffraction study at 100 K, realizes 4 type-II Weyl points between the N-th and N+1-th bands, where N is the total number of valence electrons per unit cell. Other WPs and nodal lines between different other bands also appear close to the Fermi level due to a complex topological band structure. We predict a series of strain-driven topological phase transitions in this compound, opening a wide range of possible experimental realizations of different topological semimetal phases. Crucially, with no strain, the number of observable surface Fermi arcs in this material is 2 - the smallest number of arcs consistent with time-reversal symmetry.
  • In quantum field theory, we learn that fermions come in three varieties: Majorana, Weyl, and Dirac. Here we show that in solid state systems this classification is incomplete and find several additional types of crystal symmetry-protected free fermionic excitations . We exhaustively classify linear and quadratic 3-, 6- and 8- band crossings stabilized by space group symmetries in solid state systems with spin-orbit coupling and time-reversal symmetry. Several distinct types of fermions arise, differentiated by their degeneracies at and along high symmetry points, lines, and surfaces. Some notable consequences of these fermions are the presence of Fermi arcs in non-Weyl systems and the existence of Dirac lines. Ab-initio calculations identify a number of materials that realize these exotic fermions close to the Fermi level.
  • Interfacial undercooling is of significant importance on microscopic pattern formation in the solidification of colloidal suspensions. Two kinds of interfacial undercooling are supposed to be involved in freezing colloidal suspensions, i.e. solute constitutional supercooling (SCS) caused by additives in the solvent and particulate constitutional supercooling (PCS) caused by particles. However, quantitatively identification of the interfacial undercooling of freezing colloidal suspensions is still absent and it is still unknown which undercooling is dominant. The revealing of interfacial undercooling is closely related to the design of ice-templating porous materials. Based on quantitative experimental measurements, we show that the interfacial undercooling mainly comes from SCS caused by the additives in the solvent, while the PCS can be ignored. This finding implies that the PCS theory is not the fundamental physical mechanism for patterning in the solidification of colloidal suspensions. Instead, the patterns in ice-templating method can be controlled effectively by adjusting the additives.
  • The CoCrFeNi alloy is widely accepted as an exemplary stable base for high entropy alloys (HEAs). Although various investigations prove it to be stable solid solution, its phase stability is still suspicious. Here, we identified that the CoCrFeNi HEA was thermally metastable at intermediate temperatures, and composition decomposition occurred after annealed at 750oC for 800 hrs. The increased lattice distortion induced by minor addition of Al into the CoCrFeNi base accelerated the composition decomposition and a second fcc phase with a different lattice constant occurred in the long time annealed CoCrFeNiAl0.1 HEA. A Cr-rich {\sigma} phase also precipitated from the CoCrFeNiAl0.1 HEA. The Al element can induce the instability of CoCrFeNi HEA. The revealed metastable CoCrFeNi at intermediate temperatures will greatly change the way of HEAs development.
  • Based on recently synthesized Ni3C12S12 class 2D metal-organic frameworks, we predict electronic properties of M3C12S12 and M3C12O12, where M is Zn, Cd, Hg, Be, or Mg with no M orbital contributions to bands near Fermi level. For M3C12S12, their band structures exhibit double Dirac cones with different Fermi velocities that are n and p type, respectively, which are switchable by few-percent strain. The crossing of two cones are symmetry-protected to be non-hybridizing, leading to two independent channels in 2D node-line semimetals at the same k-point akin to spin-channels in spintronics, rendering conetronics device possible. The node line rings right at their crossing, which are both electron and hole pockets at the Fermi level, can give rise to magnetoresistance that will not saturate when the magnetic field is infinitely large, due to perfect n-p compensation. For M3C12O12, together with conjugated metal-tricatecholate polymers M3(HHTP)2, the spin-polarized slow Dirac cone center is pinned precisely at the Fermi level, making the systems conducting in only one spin or cone channel. Quantum anomalous Hall effect can arise in MOFs with non-negligible spin-orbit coupling like Cu3C12O12. Compounds of M3C12S12 and M3C12O12 with different M, can be used to build spintronic and cone-selecting heterostructure devices, tunable by strain or electrostatic gating.
  • The Dirac and Weyl semimetals are unusual materials in which the nodes of the bulk states are protected against gap formation by crystalline symmetry. The chiral anomaly~\cite{Adler,Bell}, predicted to occur in both systems, was recently observed as a negative longitudinal magnetoresistance (LMR) in Na$_3$Bi and in TaAs. An important issue is whether Weyl physics appears in a broader class of materials. We report evidence for the chiral anomaly in the half-Heusler GdPtBi. In zero field, GdPtBi is a zero-gap semiconductor with quadratic bands. In a magnetic field, the Zeeman energy leads to Weyl nodes. We have observed a large negative LMR with the field-steering properties specific to the chiral anomaly. The chiral anomaly also induces strong suppression of the thermopower. We report a detailed study of the thermoelectric response function $\alpha_{xx}$ of Weyl fermions. The scheme of creating Weyl nodes from quadratic bands suggests that the chiral anomaly may be observable in a broad class of semimetals.
  • Formation of ice banding in freezing colloidal suspensions, of significance in frost heaving, ice-templating porous materials and biological materials, remains a mystery. With quantitative experiments, we reveal the formation mechanism of ice banding by focusing on the particle packing status and dynamic interface undercooling. The dynamic particle packing in front of the freezing ice is characterized based on the pulling-speed-dependent ice bandings. The quantitative details of freezing kinetics of periodic ice lenses were given based on the transient interface positions, speeds and undercooling as well as their relationships. All the evidences imply that the dynamic growth of pore ice is responsible for the formation of ice banding and we observe the ice spear may initiate from a pore ice.