• Transforming a laser beam into a mass flow has been a challenge both scientifically and technologically. Here we report the discovery of a new optofluidics principle and demonstrate the generation of a steady-state water flow by a pulsed laser beam through a glass window. In order to generate a flow or stream in the same path as the refracted laser beam in pure water from an arbitrary spot on the window, we first fill a glass cuvette with an aqueous solution of Au nanoparticles. A flow will emerge from the focused laser spot on the window after the laser is turned on for a few to tens of minutes, the flow remains after the colloidal solution is completely replaced by pure water. Microscopically, this transformation is made possible by an underlying plasmonic nanoparticle-decorated cavity which is self-fabricated on the glass by nanoparticle-assisted laser etching and exhibits size and shape uniquely tailored to the incident beam profile. Hydrophone signals indicate that the flow is driven via acoustic streaming by a long-lasting ultrasound wave that is resonantly generated by the laser and the cavity through the photoacoustic effect. The principle of this light-driven flow via ultrasound, i.e. photoacoustic streaming by coupling photoacoustics to acoustic streaming, is general and can be applied to any liquids, opening up new research and applications in optofluidics as well as traditional photoacoustics and acoustic streaming.
  • We report on a combined scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory calculation study of the SrTiO3(110)-(4 x 1) surface. It is found that antiphase domains are formed along the [1-10]-oriented stripes on the surface. The domain boundaries are decorated by defects pairs consisting of Ti2O3 vacancies and Sr adatoms, which relieve the residual stress. The formation energy of, and interactions between, vacancies result in a defect superstructure. It is suggested that the density and distributions of defects can be tuned by strain engineering, providing a fexible platform for the designed growth of complex oxide materials.
  • The (001) surfaces of cleaved Sr$_3$Ru$_2$O$_7$ and Sr$_2$RuO$_4$ samples were investigated using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory calculations. Intrinsic defects are not created during cleaving. This experimental observation is consistent with calculations, where the formation energy for a Sr and O vacancy, 4.19 eV and 3.81 eV, respectively, is significantly larger than that required to cleave the crystal, 1.11 eV/(1 $\times$ 1) unit cell. Surface oxygen vacancies can be created through electron bombardment, however, and their appearance is shown to vary strongly with the imaging conditions. Point defects observed on as-cleaved surfaces result from bulk impurities and adsorption from the residual gas.
  • Adsorption of CO at the Sr$_3$Ru$_2$O$_7$(001) surface was studied with low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory. In situ cleaved single crystals terminate in an almost perfect SrO surface. At 78 K, CO first populates impurities and then adsorbs above the apical surface O with a binding energy E$_\mathrm{ads}$=-0.7 eV. Above 100 K, this physisorbed CO replaces the surface O, forming a bent CO2 with the C end bound to the Ru underneath. The resulting metal carboxylate (Ru-COO) can be desorbed by STM manipulation. A low activation (0.2 eV) and high binding (-2.2 eV) energy confirm a strong reaction between CO and regular surface sites of Sr$_3$Ru$_2$O$_7$; likely, this reaction causes the "UHV aging effect" reported for this and other perovskite oxides.
  • Nickel vapor-deposited on the SrTiO$_3$(110) surface was studied using scanning tunneling microscopy, photoemission spectroscopy (PES), and density functional theory calculations. This surface forms a (4 $\times$ 1) reconstruction, composed of a 2-D titania structure with periodic six- and ten-membered nanopores. Anchored at these nanopores, Ni single adatoms are stabilized at room temperature. PES measurements show that the Ni adatoms create an in-gap state located at 1.9 eV below the conduction band minimum and induce an upward band bending. Both experimental and theoretical results suggest that Ni adatoms are positively charged. Our study produces well-dispersed single-adatom arrays on a well-characterized oxide support, providing a model system to investigate single-adatom catalytic and magnetic properties.
  • Antiphase domain boundaries (APDBs) in the ($n \times 1$)($n=4,5$) reconstructions of the SrTiO$_3$(110) surface were studied with scanning tunneling microscopy, x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Two types of APDBs form on each reconstruction; they consist of Ti$_x$O$_y$ vacancy clusters with a specific stoichiometry. The presence of these clusters is controlled by the oxygen pressure during annealing. The structural models of the vacancy clusters are resolved with DFT, which also shows that their relative stability depends on the chemical potential of oxygen. The surface band bending can be tuned by controlling the vacancy clusters at the domain boundaries.
  • Controlling the surface structure on the atomic scale is a major difficulty for most transition metal oxides; this is especially true for the ternary perovskites. The influence of surface stoichiometry on the atomic structure of the SrTiO$_3$(001) surface was examined with scanning tunneling microscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, low-energy He$^+$ ion scattering (LEIS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Vapor deposition of 0.8 monolayer (ML) strontium and 0.3 ML titanium, with subsequent annealing to 850 {\deg}C in 4 $\times$ 10$^{-6}$ mbar O$_2$, reversibly switches the surface between c(4 $\times$ 2) and (2 $\times$ 2) reconstructions, respectively. The combination of LEIS and XPS shows a different stoichiometry that is confined to the top layer. Geometric models for these reconstructions need to take into account these different surface compositions.
  • Three-dimensional lead halide perovskites have surprised people for their defect-tolerant electronic and optical properties, two-dimensional lead halide layered structures exhibit even more puzzling phenomena: luminescent edge states in Ruddlesden-Popper perovskites and conflicting reports of highly luminescent versus non-emissive CsPb$_{\text{2}}$Br$_{\text{5}}$. In this work, we report the observation of bright luminescent surface states on the edges of CsPb$_{\text{2}}$Br$_{\text{5}}$ microplatelets. We prove that green surface emission makes wide-bandgap single crystal CsPb$_{\text{2}}$Br$_{\text{5}}$ highly luminescent. Using polarized Raman spectroscopy and atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy, we further prove that polycrystalline CsPb$_{\text{2}}$Br$_{\text{5}}$ is responsible for the bright luminescence. We propose that these bright edge states originate from corner-sharing clusters of PbBr$_{\text{6}}$ in the distorted regions between CsPb$_{\text{2}}$Br$_{\text{5}}$ nanocrystals. Because metal halide octahedrons are building blocks of perovskites, our discoveries settle a long-standing controversy over the basic property of CsPb$_{\text{2}}$Br$_{\text{5}}$ and open new opportunities to understand, design and engineer perovskite solar cells and other optoelectronic devices.
  • Carbon nitride compounds have emerged recently as a prominent member of 2D materials beyond graphene. The experimental realizations of 2D graphitic carbon nitride g-C$_3$N$_4$, nitrogenated holey grahpene C$_2$N, polyaniline C$_3$N have shown their promising potential in energy and environmental applications. In this work, we predict a new type of carbon nitride network with a C$_9$N$_4$ stoichiometry from first principle calculations. Unlike common C-N compounds and covalent organic frameworks (COFs), which are typically insulating, surprisingly C$_9$N$_4$ is found to be a 2D nodal-line semimetal (NLSM). The nodal line in C$_9$N$_4$ forms a closed ring centered at $\Gamma$ point, which originates from the pz orbitals of both C and N. The linear crossing happens right at Fermi level contributed by two sets of dispersive Kagome and Dirac bands, which is robust due to negligible spin-orbital-coupling (SOC) in C and N. Besides, it is revealed that the formation of nodal ring is of accidental band degeneracy in nature induced by the chemical potential difference of C and N, as validated by a single orbital tight-binding model, rather than protected by crystal in-plane mirror symmetry or band topology. Interestingly, a new structure of nodal line, i.e., nodal-cylinder, is found in momentum space for AA-stacking C$_9$N$_4$. Our results imply possible functionalization for a novel metal-free C-N covalent network with interesting semimetallic properties.
  • Observation of Bloch oscillations and Wannier-Stark localization of charge carriers is typically impossible in single-crystals, because an electric field higher than the breakdown voltage is required. In BaTiO$_3$ however, high intrinsic electric fields are present due to its ferroelectric properties. With angle-resolved photoemission we directly probe the Wannier-Stark localized surface states of the BaTiO$_3$ film-vacuum interface and show that this effect extends to thin SrTiO$_3$ overlayers. The electrons are found to be localized along the in-plane polarization direction of the BaTiO$_3$ film.
  • Mainly for the sake of solving the lack of keyword-specific data, we propose one Keyword Spotting (KWS) system using Deep Neural Network (DNN) and Connectionist Temporal Classifier (CTC) on power-constrained small-footprint mobile devices, taking full advantage of general corpus from continuous speech recognition which is of great amount. DNN is to directly predict the posterior of phoneme units of any personally customized key-phrase, and CTC to produce a confidence score of the given phoneme sequence as responsive decision-making mechanism. The CTC-KWS has competitive performance in comparison with purely DNN based keyword specific KWS, but not increasing any computational complexity.
  • It is very interesting to bring plasmonic circular dichroism spectroscopy to the mid-infrared spectral interval, and there are two reasons for this. This spectral interval is very important for thermal bio-imaging and, simultaneously, this spectral range includes vibrational lines of many chiral biomolecules. Here we demonstrate that graphene plasmons indeed offer such opportunity. In particular, we show that chiral graphene assemblies consisting of a few graphene nanodisks can generate strong circular dichroism (CD) in the mid-infrared interval. The CD signal is generated due to the plasmon-plasmon coupling between adjacent nanodisks in the specially designed chiral graphene assemblies. Because of the large dimension mismatch between the thickness of a graphene layer and the incoming light's wavelength, three-dimensional configurations with a total height of a few hundred nanometers are necessary to obtain a strong CD signal in the mid-infrared range. The mid-infrared CD strength is mainly governed by the total dimensions (total height and helix scaffold radius) of the graphene nanodisk assembly, and by the plasmon-plasmon interaction strength between its constitutive nanodisks. Both positive and negative CD bands can be observed in the graphene assembly array. The frequency interval of the plasmonic CD spectra overlaps with the vibrational modes of some important biomolecules, such as DNA and many different peptides, giving rise to the possibility of enhancing the vibrational optical activity of these molecular species by attaching them to the graphene assemblies. Simultaneously the spectral range of chiral mid-infrared plasmons in our structures appears near the typical wavelength of the human-body thermal radiation and, therefore, our chiral metastructures can be potentially utilized as optical components in thermal imaging devices.
  • Generation of energetic (hot) electrons is an intrinsic property of any plasmonic nanostructure under illumination. Simultaneously, a striking advantage of metal nanocrystals over semiconductors lies in their very large absorption cross sections. Therefore, metal nanostructures with strong and tailored plasmonic resonances are very attractive for photocatalytic applications. However, the central questions regarding plasmonic hot electrons are how to quantify and extract the optically-excited energetic electrons in a nanocrystal. We develop a theory describing the generation rates and the energy-distributions of hot electrons in nanocrystals with various geometries. In our theory, hot electrons are generated owing to surfaces and hot spots. The formalism predicts that large optically-excited nanocrystals show the excitation of mostly low-energy Drude electrons, whereas plasmons in small nanocrystals involve mostly hot electrons. The energy distributions of electrons in an optically-excited nanocrystal show how the quantum many-body state in small particles evolves towards the classical state described by the Drude model when increasing nanocrystal size. We show that the rate of surface decay of plasmons in nanocrystals is directly related to the rate of generation of hot electrons. Based on a detailed many-body theory involving kinetic coefficients, we formulate a simple scheme describing the plasmon's dephasing. In most nanocrystals, the main decay mechanism of a plasmon is the Drude friction-like process and the secondary path comes from generation of hot electrons due to surfaces and electromagnetic hot spots. This latter path strongly depends on the size, shape and material of the nanocrystal, correspondingly affecting its efficiency of hot-electron production. The results in the paper can be used to guide the design of plasmonic nanomaterials for photochemistry and photodetectors.
  • The two-dimensional electron gas at the surface of titanates gathered attention due to its potential to replace conventional silicon based semiconductors in the future. In this study, we investigated films of the parent perovskite CaTiO$_3$, grown by pulsed laser deposition, by means of angular-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. The films show a c(4x2) surface reconstruction after the growth that is reduced to a p(2x2) reconstruction under UV-light. At the CaTiO$_3$ film surface, a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is found with an occupied band width of 400 meV. With our findings CaTiO$_3$ is added to the group of oxides with a 2DEG at their surface. Our study widens the phase space to investigate strontium and barium doped CaTiO$_3$ and the interplay of ferroelectric properties with the 2DEG at oxide surfaces. This could open up new paths to tailor two-dimensional transport properties of these systems towards possible applications.
  • Plasmonic nanocrystals with hot spots are able to localize optical energy in small spaces. In such physical systems, near-field interactions between molecules and plasmons can become especially strong. This paper considers the case of a nanoparticle dimer and a chiral biomolecule. In our model, a chiral molecule is placed in the gap between two plasmonic nanoparticles, where the electromagnetic hot spot occurs. Since many important biomolecules have optical transitions in the UV, we consider the case of Aluminum nanoparticles, as they offer strong electromagnetic enhancements in the blue and UV spectral intervals. Our calculations show that the complex composed of a chiral molecule and an Al-dimer exhibits strong CD signals in the plasmonic spectral region. In contrast to the standard Au- and Ag-nanocrystals, the Al system may have a much better spectral overlap between the typical biomolecule's optical transitions and the nanocrystals' plasmonic band. Overall, we found that Al nanocrystals used as CD antennas exhibit unique properties as compared to other commonly studied plasmonic and dielectric materials. The plasmonic systems investigated in this study can be potentially used for sensing chirality of biomolecules, which is of interest in applications such as drug development.
  • Nanostars (NSTs) are spiky nanocrystals with plasmonic hot spots. In this study, we show that strong electromagnetic fields localized in the nanostar tips are able to generate large numbers of energetic (hot) electrons, which can be used for photochemistry. To compute plasmonic nanocrystals with complex shapes, we develop a quantum approach based on the effect of surface generation of hot electrons. We then apply this approach to nanostars, nanorods and nanospheres. We found that that the plasmonic nanostars with multiple hot spots have the best characteristics for optical generation of hot electrons compared to the cases of nanorods and nanospheres. Generation of hot electrons is a quantum effect and appears due to the optical transitions near the surfaces of nanocrystals. The quantum properties of nanocrystals are strongly size- and material-dependent. In particular, the silver nanocrystals significantly overcome the case of gold for the quantum rates of hot-electron generation. Another important factor is the size of a nanocrystal. Small nanocrystals are more efficient for the hot-electron generation since they exhibit stronger quantum surface effects. The results of this study can useful for designing novel material systems for solar photocatalytic applications.
  • It is challenging to strongly localize temperature in small volumes because heat transfer is a diffusive process. Here we show how to overcome this limitation using electrodynamic hot spots and interference effects in the regime of continuous-wave (CW) excitation. We introduce a set of figures of merit for the localization of temperature and for the efficiency of the plasmonic photo-thermal effect. Our calculations show that the temperature localization in a trimer nanoparticle assembly is a complex function of the geometry and sizes. Large nanoparticles in the trimer play the role of the nano-optical antenna whereas the small nanoparticle in the plasmonic hot spot acts as a nano-heater. Under the peculiar conditions, the temperature increase inside a nanoparticle trimer can be localized in a hot spot region at the small heater nanoparticle and, in this way, a thermal hot spot can be realized. However, the overall power efficiency of temperature generation in this trimer is much smaller than that of a single nanoparticle. We can overcome the latter disadvantage by using a trimer with a nanorod. In the trimer assembly composed of a nanorod and two spherical nanoparticles, we observe a strong plasmonic Fano effect that leads to the concertation of optical energy dissipation in the small heater nanorod. Therefore, the power-absorption efficiency of temperature generation in the nanorod-based assembly greatly increases due to the strong plasmonic Fano effect. The Fano heater incorporating a small nanorod in the hot spot has obviously the best performance compared to both single nanocrystals and a nanoparticle trimer. The principles of heat localization described here can be potentially used for thermal photo-catalysis, energy conversion and bio-related applications.
  • The monolithic integration of electronics and photonics has attracted enormous attention due to its potential applications. However, the realization of such hybrid circuits has remained a challenge because it requires optical communication at nanometer scales. A major challenge to this integration is the identification of a suitable material. After discussing the material aspect of the challenge, we identified atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) as a perfect material platform to implement the circuit. The selection of TMDs is based on their very distinct property: monolayer TMDs are able to emit and absorb light at the same wavelength determined by direct exciton transitions. To prove the concept, we fabricated simple devices consisting of silver nanowires as plasmonic waveguides and monolayer TMDs as active optoelectronic media. Using photoexcitation, direct optical imaging and spectral analysis, we demonstrated generation and detection of surface plasmon polaritons by monolayer TMDs. Regarded as novel materials for electronics and photonics, transition metal dichalcogenides are expected to find new applications in next generation integrated circuits.
  • Bounding the number of preperiodic points of quadratic polynomials with rational coefficients is one case of the Uniform Boundedness Conjecture in arithmetic dynamics. Here, we provide a general framework that may reduce finding periodic points of such polynomials over Galois extensions of $\mathbb{Q}$ to finding periodic points over the rationals. Furthermore, we present evidence that there are no such polynomials (up to linear conjugation) with periodic points of exact period 5 in quadratic fields by searching for points on an algebraic curve that classifies quadratic periodic points of exact period 5 and suggesting the application of the method of Chabauty and Coleman for further progress.
  • The question whether excess electrons in SrTiO3 form free or trapped carriers is a crucial aspect for the electronic properties of this important material. This fundamental ambiguity prevents a consistent interpretation of the puzzling experimental situation, where results support one or the other scenario depending on the type of experiment that is conducted. Using density functional theory corrected with an on-site Coulomb interaction U, it is established that excess electrons form small polarons if the electron density is higher than ~ 1%. For densities below this critical value, the electrons stay delocalized or become large polarons. Our modeling of oxygen deficient SrTiO3 provides an alternative picture with respect to previous theoretical studies endowing firm evidence for the observed, temperature-driven metal-insulator transition in samples with homogeneously distributed oxygen vacancies. Small polarons confined to Ti(3+) sites are immobile at low temperature but can be thermally activated into a conductive state.
  • Orthorhombic SrIrO3 is a typical spin-orbit-coupling correlated metal that shows diversified physical properties under the external stimuli. Here nonlinear Hall effect and weakly temperature-dependent resistance are observed in a SrIrO3 film epitaxially grown on SrTiO3 substrate. It infers that orthorhombic SrIrO3 is a semimetal oxide. However, linear Hall effect and insensitive-temperature-dependent resistance are observed in SrIrO3 films grown on (La,Sr)(Al,Ta)O3 (LSAT) substrates, suggesting a tunable semimetallic state due to band structure change in SrIrO3 films under different compressive strain. The mechanism of this evolution is explored in detail through strain-state analysis by reciprocal space mapping and electron diffraction, carrier density and mobility calculations, as well as electronic band structure evolution under compressive strain (predicted by tight-binding approximation). It might suggest that the strain-induced band shift leads to the semimetallic tuning in the SrIrO3 film grown on from SrTiO3 to LSAT substrates. Our findings illustrate the tunability of SrIrO3 properties and pave the way to induce novel physical states in SrIrO3 such as the proposed topological insulator state in heterostructures.
  • The interaction of water with oxide surfaces is of great interest for both fundamental science and applications. We present a combined theoretical [density functional theory (DFT)] and experimental [Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM), photoemission spectroscopy (PES)] study of water interaction with the two-dimensional titania overlayer that terminates the SrTiO$_3$(110)-(4$\times$1) surface and consists of TiO$_4$ tetrahedra. STM, core-level and valence band PES show that H$_2$O neither adsorbs nor dissociates on the stoichiometric surface at room temperature, while it dissociates at oxygen vacancies. This is in agreement with DFT calculations, which show that the energy barriers for water dissociation on the stoichiometric and reduced surfaces are 1.7 and 0.9 eV, respectively. We propose that water weakly adsorbs on two-dimensional, tetrahedrally coordinated overlayers.
  • Two dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) at a oxide heterostructures are attracting considerable attention, as these might substitute conventional semiconductors for novel electronic devices [1]. Here we present a minimal set-up for such a 2DEG -the SrTiO3(110)-(4 x 1) surface, natively terminated with one monolayer of chemically-inert titania. Oxygen vacancies induced by synchrotron radiation migrate under- neath this overlayer, this leads to a confining potential and electron doping such that a 2DEG develops. Our angular resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and theoretical results show that confinement along (110) is strikingly different from a (001) crystal orientation. In particular the quantized subbands show a surprising "semi-heavy" band, in contrast to the analogue in the bulk, and a high electronic anisotropy. This anisotropy and even the effective mass of the (110) 2DEG is tunable by doping, offering a high flexibility to engineer the properties of this system.
  • The van der Waals epitaxy of single crystalline Bi2Se3 film was achieved on hydrogen passivated Si(111) (H:Si) substrate by physical vapor deposition. Valence band structures of Bi2Se3/H:Si heterojunction were investigated by X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy and Ultraviolet Photoemission Spectroscopy. The measured Schottky barrier height at the Bi2Se3-H:Si interface was 0.31 eV. The findings pave the way for economically preparing heterojunctions and multilayers of layered compound families of topological insulators.
  • We present a Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) investigation of gold deposited at the magnetite Fe3O4(001) surface at room temperature. This surface forms a reconstruction with (\surd2\times\surd2)R45{\deg} symmetry, where pairs of Fe and neighboring O ions are slightly displaced laterally, forming undulating rows with 'narrow' and 'wide' adsorption sites. At fractional monolayer coverages, single Au adatoms adsorb exclusively at the narrow sites, with no significant sintering up to annealing temperatures of 400 {\deg}C. The strong preference for this site is possibly related to charge and orbital ordering within the first subsurface layer of the reconstructed Fe3O4(001) surface. Because of their high thermal stability, the ordered Au atoms at Fe3O4(001)- (\surd2\times\surd2)R45{\deg} could provide useful for probing the chemical reactivity of single atomic species.