• The study of spatial symmetries in solids, or the crystallographic space groups, was accomplished during the last century, and had greatly improved our understanding of electronic band structures in solids. Nowadays, the "symmetry data" of any band structure, i.e., the irreducible representations of all valence bands, can be readily extracted from standard numerical calculations based on first principles. On the other hand, the topological invariants, the defining quantities of topological materials, are in general considerably difficult to calculate ab initio. While topological materials promise robust and exotic physical properties both scientifically intriguing and favorable for the designs of new quantum devices, their numerical prediction and discovery have been critically slowed down by the involved calculation of the invariants. To remove the hindrance to a fast and automated search for topological materials, we provide an explicit and exhaustive mapping from symmetry data to topological invariants for any gapped band structure in each one of the space groups in the presence of time-reversal symmetry. The mapping is completed using the theoretical tool of "layer construction", where topological states in three dimensions jointly protected by time-reversal and spatial symmetries are assembled from decoupled two-dimensional topological states, in the same way atomic insulators are assembled from decoupled, point-like atomic orbitals. The simple structure of layer constructions allows simplified calculation of both the symmetry data and the topological invariants, so that a matching between the two sets yields the mapping we need. With these results and symmetry data obtained from standard first principles numerics, finding topological invariants reduces to a simple search in the "dictionary".
  • In this paper, we propose a first principle calculation method for the effective Zeeman's coupling based on the second perturbation theory and apply it to a few topological materials. For Bi and Bi$_2$Se$_3$, our numerical results are in good accord with the experimental data; for Na$_3$Bi, TaN, and ZrTe$_5$, the structure of the multi-bands Zeeman's couplings are discussed. Especially, we discuss the impact of Zeeman's coupling on the Fermi surface's topology in Na$_3$Bi in detail.
  • We study fourfold rotation invariant gapped topological systems with time-reversal symmetry in two and three dimensions ($d=2,3$). We show that in both cases nontrivial topology is manifested by the presence of the $(d-2)$-dimensional edge states, existing at a point in 2D or along a line in 3D. For fermion systems without interaction, the bulk topological invariants are given in terms of the Wannier centers of filled bands, and can be readily calculated using a Fu-Kane-like formula when inversion symmetry is also present. The theory is extended to strongly interacting systems through explicit construction of microscopic models having robust $(d-2)$-dimensional edge states.
  • The quantum limit can be easily reached in the Dirac semimetals under the magnetic field, which will lead to some exotic many-body physics due to the high degeneracy of the topological zeroth Landau bands (LBs). By solving the effective Hamiltonian, which is derived by tracing out the high energy degrees of freedom, at the self-consistent mean field level, we have systematically studied the instability of Dirac semimetal under a strong magnetic field. A charge density wave (CDW) phase and a polarized nematic phase formed by "exciton condensation" are predicted as the ground state for the tilted and untilted bands, respectively. Furthermore, we propose that, distinguished from the CDW phase, the polarized nematic phase can be identified in experiments by anisotropic transport and Raman scattering.
  • Recently, two-dimensional (2D) transition metal carbides and nitrides, namely, MXenes have attracted lots of attention for electronic and energy storage applications. Due to a large spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and the existence of a Dirac-like band at the Fermi energy, it has been theoretically proposed that some of the MXenes will be topological insulators (TIs). Up to now, all of the predicted TI MXenes belong to transition metal carbides, whose transition metal atom is W, Mo or Cr. Here, on the basis of first-principles and Z2 index calculations, we demonstrate that some of the MXene nitrides can also be TIs. We find that Ti3N2F2 is a 2D TI, whereas Zr3N2F2 is a semimetal with nontrivial band topology and can be turned into a 2D TI when the lattice is stretched. We also find that the tensile strain can convert Hf3N2F2 semiconductor into a 2D TI. Since Ti is one of the mostly used transition metal element in the synthesized MXenes, we expect that our prediction can advance the future application of MXenes as TI devices.
  • Valleytronics is one of the breaking-through to the technology of electronics, which provides a new degree of freedom to manipulate the properties of electrons. Combining DFT calculations, optical absorption analysis and the linear polarization-resolved transmission measurement together, we report that three pairs of valleys, which feature opposite optical absorption, existing in the 3-dimensional (3D) group-IV monochalcogenids. By applying the linearly-polarized light, valley polarization is successfully generated for the first time in a 3D system, which opens a new direction for the exploration of the valley materials and provides a good platform for the photodetector and valleytronic devices. Valley modulation versus the in-plane strain in GeSe is also studied, suggesting an effective way to get the optimized valleytronic properties.
  • Based on first-principles calculations and effective model analysis, we propose that the WC-type HfC, in the absence of spin-orbit coupling (SOC), can host a three-dimensional nodal chain semimetal state. Distinguished from the previous material IrF4 [T. Bzdusek et al., Nature 538, 75 (2016)], the nodal chain here is protected by mirror reflection symmetries of a simple space group, while in IrF4 the nonsymmorphic space group with a glide plane is a necessity. Moreover, in the presence of SOC, the nodal chain in WC type HfC evolves into Weyl points. In the Brillouin zone, a total of 30 pairs of Weyl points in three types are obtained through the first-principles calculations. Besides, the surface states and the pattern of the surface Fermi arcs connecting these Weyl points are studied, which may be measured by future experiments.
  • Topological states of electrons and photons have attracted significant interest recently. Topological mechanical states also being actively explored, have been limited to macroscopic systems of kHz frequency. The discovery of topological phonons of atomic vibrations at THz frequency can provide a new venue for studying heat transfer, phonon scattering and electron-phonon interaction. Here, we employed ab initio calculations to identify a class of noncentrosymmetric materials of $M$Si ($M$=Fe,Co,Mn,Re,Ru) having double Weyl points in both their acoustic and optical phonon spectra. They exhibit novel topological points termed "spin-1 Weyl point" at the Brillouin zone~(BZ) center and "charge-2 Dirac point" at the zone corner. The corresponding gapless surface phonon dispersions are double helicoidal sheets whose isofrequency contours form a single non-contractible loop in the surface BZ. In addition, the global structure of the surface bands can be analytically expressed as double-periodic Weierstrass elliptic functions. Our prediction of topological bulk and surface phonons can be experimentally verified by neutron scattering and electron energy loss spectroscopy, opening brand new directions for topological phononics.
  • In the present paper, we propose that the chiral magnetic effect, the direct consequence of the presence of Weyl points in the band structure, can be detected by its coupling to certain phonon modes, which behave like pseudo scalars under point group transformations. Such coupling can generate resonance between intrinsic plasmon oscillation and the corresponding phonon modes, leading to dramatic modification of the optical response by the external magnetic field, which provides a new way to study chiral magnetic effect by optical measurements.
  • We review the recent, mainly theoretical, progress in the study of topological nodal line semimetals in three dimensions. In these semimetals, the conduction and the valence bands cross each other along a one-dimensional curve in the three-dimensional Brillouin zone, and any perturbation that preserves a certain symmetry group (generated by either spatial symmetries or time-reversal symmetry) cannot remove this crossing line and open a full direct gap between the two bands. The nodal line(s) is hence topologically protected by the symmetry group, and can be associated with a topological invariant. In this Review, (i) we enumerate the symmetry groups that may protect a topological nodal line; (ii) we write down the explicit form of the topological invariant for each of these symmetry groups in terms of the wave functions on the Fermi surface, establishing a topological classification; (iii) for certain classes, we review the proposals for the realization of these semimetals in real materials and (iv) we discuss different scenarios that when the protecting symmetry is broken, how a topological nodal line semimetal becomes Weyl semimetals, Dirac semimetals and other topological phases and (v) we discuss the possible physical effects accessible to experimental probes in these materials.
  • We report the anisotropic magneto-transport measurement on a non-compound band semiconductor black phosphorus (BP) with magnetic field B up to 16 Tesla applied in both perpendicular and parallel to electric current I under hydrostatic pressures. The BP undergoes a topological Lifshitz transition from band semiconductor to a zero-gap Dirac semimetal state, characterized by a weak localization-weak antilocaliation transition at low magnetic fields and the emergence of a nontrivial Berry Phase of detected by SdH magneto-oscillations in magnetoresistance curves. In the transition region, we observe a pressure-dependent negative MR only in the B//I configuration. This negative longitudinal MR is attributed to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomaly (topological E$\cdot$B term) in the presence of weak antilocalization corrections.
  • We propose that CaP3 family of materials, which include CaP3, CaAs3, SrP3, SrAs3 and BaAs3 can host a three-dimensional topological nodal line semimetal states. Based on first-principle calculations and kp model analysis, we show that a closed topological nodal line exists near the Fermi energy, which is protected by the coexistence of time-reversal and spatial inversion symmetry when the band inversion happens. A drumhead-like surface states are also obtained on the c-direction surface of these materials.
  • The quantized version of the anomalous Hall effect has been predicted to occur in magnetic topological insulators, but the experimental realization has been challenging. Here, we report the observation of the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect in thin films of Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3, a magnetic topological insulator. At zero magnetic field, the gate-tuned anomalous Hall resistance reaches the predicted quantized value of h/e^2,accompanied by a considerable drop of the longitudinal resistance. Under a strong magnetic field, the longitudinal resistance vanishes whereas the Hall resistance remains at the quantized value. The realization of the QAH effect may lead to the development of low-power-consumption electronics.
  • By using first-principles calculations, we propose that WC-type ZrTe is a new type of topological semimetal (TSM). It has six pairs of chiral Weyl nodes in its first Brillouin zone, but it is distinguished from other existing TSMs by having additional two paris of massless fermions with triply degenerate nodal points as proposed in the isostructural compounds TaN and NbN. The mirror symmetry, three-fold rotational symmetry and time-reversal symmetry require all of the Weyl nodes to have the same velocity vectors and locate at the same energy level. The Fermi arcs on different surfaces are shown, which may be measured by future experiments. It demonstrates that the "material universe" can support more intriguing particles simultaneously.
  • Using first-principles calculation and symmetry analysis, we propose that \theta-TaN is a topological semimetal having a new type of point nodes, i.e., triply degenerate nodal points. Each node is a band crossing between degenerate and non-degenerate bands along the high-symmetry line in the Brillouin zone, and is protected by crystalline symmetries. Such new type of nodes will always generate singular touching points between different Fermi surfaces and 3D spin texture around them. Breaking the crystalline symmetry by external magnetic field or strain leads to various of topological phases. By studying the Landau levels under a small field along $c$-axis, we demonstrate that the system has a new quantum anomaly that we call "helical anomaly".
  • Quantum topological materials, exemplified by topological insulators, three-dimensional Dirac semimetals and Weyl semimetals, have attracted much attention recently because of their unique electronic structure and physical properties. Very lately it is proposed that the three-dimensional Weyl semimetals can be further classified into two types. In the type I Weyl semimetals, a topologically protected linear crossing of two bands, i.e., a Weyl point, occurs at the Fermi level resulting in a point-like Fermi surface. In the type II Weyl semimetals, the Weyl point emerges from a contact of an electron and a hole pocket at the boundary resulting in a highly tilted Weyl cone. In type II Weyl semimetals, the Lorentz invariance is violated and a fundamentally new kind of Weyl Fermions is produced that leads to new physical properties. WTe2 is interesting because it exhibits anomalously large magnetoresistance. It has ignited a new excitement because it is proposed to be the first candidate of realizing type II Weyl Fermions. Here we report our angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) evidence on identifying the type II Weyl Fermion state in WTe2. By utilizing our latest generation laser-based ARPES system with superior energy and momentum resolutions, we have revealed a full picture on the electronic structure of WTe2. Clear surface state has been identified and its connection with the bulk electronic states in the momentum and energy space shows a good agreement with the calculated band structures with the type II Weyl states. Our results provide spectroscopic evidence on the observation of type II Weyl states in WTe2. It has laid a foundation for further exploration of novel phenomena and physical properties in the type II Weyl semimetals.
  • Topological quantum materials, including topological insulators and superconductors, Dirac semimetals and Weyl semimetals, have attracted much attention recently for their unique electronic structure, spin texture and physical properties. Very lately, a new type of Weyl semimetals has been proposed where the Weyl Fermions emerge at the boundary between electron and hole pockets in a new phase of matter, which is distinct from the standard type I Weyl semimetals with a point-like Fermi surface. The Weyl cone in this type II semimetals is strongly tilted and the related Fermi surface undergos a Lifshitz transition, giving rise to a new kind of chiral anomaly and other new physics. MoTe2 is proposed to be a candidate of a type II Weyl semimetal; the sensitivity of its topological state to lattice constants and correlation also makes it an ideal platform to explore possible topological phase transitions. By performing laser-based angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) measurements with unprecedentedly high resolution, we have uncovered electronic evidence of type II semimetal state in MoTe2. We have established a full picture of the bulk electronic states and surface state for MoTe2 that are consistent with the band structure calculations. A single branch of surface state is identified that connects bulk hole pockets and bulk electron pockets. Detailed temperature-dependent ARPES measurements show high intensity spot-like features that is ~40 meV above the Fermi level and is close to the momentum space consistent with the theoretical expectation of the type II Weyl points. Our results constitute electronic evidence on the nature of the Weyl semimetal state that favors the presence of two sets of type II Weyl points in MoTe2.
  • In this work, we discuss the connections between pseudo spin, real spin of electrons in material and spin polarization of photo-emitted electrons out of material. By investigating these three spin textures for Bi$_2$Se$_3$ and SmB$_6$ compounds, we find that the spin orientation of photo-electrons for SmB$_6$ has different correspondence to pseudo spin and real spin compare to Bi$_2$Se$_3$, due to the different symmetry properties of the photo-emission matrix between initial and final states. We calculate the spin polarization and circular dichroism spectra of photo-emitted electrons for both compounds, which can be detected by spin-resolved and circular dichroism angle resolved photo-emission spectroscopy experiment.
  • We have given a summary on our theoretical predictions of three kinds of topological semimetals (TSMs), namely, Dirac semimetal (DSM), Weyl semimetal (WSM) and Node-Line Semimetal (NLSM). TSMs are new states of quantum matters, which are different with topological insulators. They are characterized by the topological stability of Fermi surface, whether it encloses band crossing point, i.e., Dirac cone like energy node, or not. They are distinguished from each other by the degeneracy and momentum space distribution of the nodal points. To realize these intriguing topological quantum states is quite challenging and crucial to both fundamental science and future application. In 2012 and 2013, Na$_3$Bi and Cd$_3$As$_2$ were theoretically predicted to be DSM, respectively. Their experimental verifications in 2014 have ignited the hot and intensive studies on TSMs. The following theoretical prediction of nonmagnetic WSM in TaAs family stimulated a second wave and many experimental works have come out in this year. In 2014, a kind of three dimensional crystal of carbon has been proposed to be NLSM due to negligible spin-orbit coupling and coexistence of time-reversal and inversion symmetry. Though the final experimental confirmation of NLSM is still missing, there have been several theoretical proposals, including Cu$_3$PdN from us. In the final part, we have summarized the whole family of TSMs and their relationship.
  • The topological materials have attracted much attention recently. While three-dimensional topological insulators are becoming abundant, two-dimensional topological insulators remain rare, particularly in natural materials. ZrTe5 has host a long-standing puzzle on its anomalous transport properties; its underlying origin remains elusive. Lately, ZrTe5 has ignited renewed interest because it is predicted that single-layer ZrTe5 is a two-dimensional topological insulator and there is possibly a topological phase transition in bulk ZrTe5. However, the topological nature of ZrTe5 is under debate as some experiments point to its being a three-dimensional or quasi-two-dimensional Dirac semimetal. Here we report high-resolution laser-based angle-resolved photoemission measurements on ZrTe5. The electronic property of ZrTe5 is dominated by two branches of nearly-linear-dispersion bands at the Brillouin zone center. These two bands are separated by an energy gap that decreases with decreasing temperature but persists down to the lowest temperature we measured (~2 K). The overall electronic structure exhibits a dramatic temperature dependence; it evolves from a p-type semimetal with a hole-like Fermi pocket at high temperature, to a semiconductor around ~135 K where its resistivity exhibits a peak, to an n-type semimetal with an electron-like Fermi pocket at low temperature. These results indicate a clear electronic evidence of the temperature-induced Lifshitz transition in ZrTe5. They provide a natural understanding on the underlying origin of the resistivity anomaly at ~135 K and its associated reversal of the charge carrier type. Our observations also provide key information on deciphering the topological nature of ZrTe5 and possible temperature-induced topological phase transition.
  • We report the observation of colossal positive magnetoresistance (MR) in single crystalline, high mobility TaAs2 semimetal. The excellent fit of MR by a single quadratic function of the magnetic field B over a wide temperature range (T = 2-300 K) suggests the semiclassical nature of the MR. The measurements of Hall effect and Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations, as well as band structure calculations suggest that the giant MR originates from the nearly perfectly compensated electrons and holes in TaAs2. The quadratic MR can even exceed 1,200,000% at B = 9 T and T = 2 K, which is one of the largest values among those of all known semi-metallic compounds including the very recently discovered WTe2 and NbSb2. The giant positive magnetoresistance in TaAs2, which not only has a fundamentally different origin from the negative colossal MR observed in magnetic systems, but also provides a nice complemental system that will be beneficial for applications in magnetoelectronic devices
  • We show that the intensity of pumped states near Weyl point is different when pumped with left- and right-handed circular polarized light, which leads to a special circular dichroism (CD) in time-dependent angle resolved photoemission spectra (ARPES). We derive the expression for the CD of time-dependent ARPES, which is directly related to the chirality of Weyl fermions. Based on the above derivation, we further propose a method to determine the chirality for a given Weyl point from the CD of time-dependent ARPES. The corresponding CD spectra for TaAs has then been calculated from the first principle, which can be compared with the future experiments.
  • Based on first-principles calculations and tight-binding model analysis, we propose that black phosphorus (BP) can host a three-dimensional topological node-line semimetal state under pressure when spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is ignored. A closed topological node line exists in the first Brillouin zone (BZ) near the Fermi energy, which is protected by the coexistence of time-reversal and spatial inversion symmetry with band inversion driven by pressure. Drumhead-like surface states have been obtained on the beard (100) surface. Due to the weak intrinsic SOC of phosphorus atom, a band gap less than 10 meV is opened along the node line in the presence of SOC and the surface states are almost unaffected by SOC.
  • By using first-principles calculations, we propose that ZrSiO can be looked as a three-dimensional (3D) oxide weak topological insulator (TI) and its single layer is a long-sought-after 2D oxide TI with a band gap up to 30 meV. Calculated phonon spectrum of the single layer ZrSiO indicates it is dynamically stable and the experimental achievements in growing oxides with atomic precision ensure that it can be readily synthesized. This will lead to novel devices based on TIs, the so called "topotronic" devices, operating under room-temperature and stable when exposed in the air. Thus, a new field of "topotronics" will arise. Another intriguing thing is this oxide 2D TI has the similar crystal structure as the well-known iron-pnictide superconductor LiFeAs. This brings great promise in realizing the combination of superconductor and TI, paving the way to various extraordinary quantum phenomena, such as topological superconductor and Majorana modes. We further find that there are many other isostructural compounds hosting the similar electronic structure and forming a $WHM$-family with $W$ being Zr, Hf or La, $H$ being group IV or group V element, and $M$ being group VI one.
  • Band gap anomaly is a well-known issue in lead chalcogenides PbX (X=S, Se, Te, Po). Combining ab initio calculations and tight-binding (TB) method, we have studied the band evolution in PbX, and found that the band gap anomaly in PbTe is mainly related to the high onsite energy of Te 5s orbital and the large s-p hopping originated from the irregular extended distribution of Te 5s electrons. Furthermore, our calculations show that PbPo is an indirect band gap (6.5 meV) semiconductor with band inversion at L point, which clearly indicates that PbPo is a topological crystalline insulator (TCI). The calculated mirror Chern number and surface states double confirm this conclusion.