• Gravitational radiation plays an important role in astrophysics. Based on the fact that our universe is expanding, the gravitational radiation when a positive cosmological constant is presented has been studied along with two different ways recently, one is the Bondi-Sachs (BS) framework in which the result is shown by BS quantities in the asymptotic null structure, the other is the perturbation approach in which the result is presented by the quadrupoles of source. Therefore, it is worth to interpret the quantities in asymptotic null structure in terms of the information of the source. In this paper, we investigate this problem and find the explicit expressions of BS quantities in terms of the quadrupoles of source in asymptotically de Sitter spacetime. We also estimate how far away the source is, the cosmological constant may affect the detection of the gravitational wave.
  • Recently, the LIGO-Virgo collaboration reported their first detection of gravitational wave (GW) signals from a low mass compact binary merger GW170817, which is most likely due to a double neutron star (NS) merger. With the GW signals only, the chirp mass of the binary is precisely constrained to $1.188^{+0.004}_{-0.002}~\rm{M_{\odot}}$, but the mass ratio is loosely constrained in the range $0.4-1$, so that a very rough estimation of the individual NS masses ($0.86~{\rm M_{\odot}}<M_1<1.36~\rm{M_{\odot}}$ and $1.36~{\rm M_{\odot}}<M_2<2.26~\rm{M_{\odot}}$) was obtained. Here we propose that if one can constrain the dynamical ejecta mass through performing kilonova modeling of the optical/IR data, by utilizing an empirical relation between the dynamical ejecta mass and the mass ratio of NS binaries, one may place a more stringent constraint on the mass ratio of the system. For instance, considering that the red "kilonova" component is powered by the dynamical ejecta, we reach a tight constraint on the mass ratio in the range of $0.46-0.59$. Alternatively, if the blue "kilonova" component is powered by the dynamical ejecta, the mass ratio would be constrained in the range of $0.53-0.67$. Overall, such a multi-messenger approach could narrow down the mass ratio of GW170817 system to the range of $0.46-0.67$, which gives a more precise estimation of the individual NS mass than pure GW signal analysis, i.e. $0.90~{\rm M_{\odot}}<M_1<1.16~{\rm M_{\odot}}$ and $1.61~{\rm M_{\odot}}<M_2<2.11~{\rm M_{\odot}}$.
  • In the middle of last century, Bondi and his coworkers proposed an out going boundary condition for the Einstein equations. Based on such boundary condition the authors theoretically solved the puzzle of the existence problem of gravitational wave. Currently many works on gravitational wave source modeling use Bondi's result to do the analysis including the gravitational wave calculation in numerical relativity. Recently more and more observations imply that the Einstein equations should be modified with an nonzero cosmological constant. In this work we use Bondi's original method to treat the Einstein equations with cosmological constant for theoretical curiosity. We find that the gravitational wave does not essentially exist if Bondi's original out going boundary condition is imposed. We find this unphysical result is due to the non-consistency between Bondi's original out going boundary condition and the Einstein equations with cosmological constant. Based on theoretical analysis, we propose an new Bondi-type out going boundary condition for the Einstein equations with cosmological constant. With this new boundary condition, the gravitational wave behavior for the Einstein equations with cosmological constant is similar to the Einstein equations without cosmological constant. In particular, when the cosmological constant goes to zero, the behavior of the Einstein equations without cosmological constant is recovered. Together with gravitational wave, electromagnetic wave is also analyzed. The boundary conditions for electromagnetic wave does not depend on the cosmological constant.
  • Gravitational wave source localization problem is important in gravitational wave astronomy. Regarding ground-based detector, almost all of the previous investigations only considered the difference of arrival time among the detector network for source localization. Within the matched filtering framework, the information beside the arrival time difference can possibly also do some help on source localization. Especially when an eccentric binary is considered, the character involved in the gravitational waveform may improve the source localization. We investigate this effect systematically in the current paper. During the investigation, the enhanced post-circular (EPC) waveform model is used to describe the eccentric binary coalesce. We find that the source localization accuracy does increase along with the eccentricity increases. But such improvement depends on the total mass of the binary. For total mass 100M${}_\odot$ binary, the source localization accuracy may be improved about 2 times in general when the eccentricity increases from 0 to 0.4. For total mass 65M${}_\odot$ binary (GW150914-like binary), the improvement factor is about 1.3 when the eccentricity increases from 0 to 0.4. For total mass 22M${}_\odot$ binary (GW151226-like binary), such improvement is ignorable.
  • It has been estimated that a significant proportion of binary neutron star merger events produce long-lived massive remnants supported by differential rotation and subject to rotational instabilities. To examine formation and oscillation of rapidly rotating neutron stars (NS) after merger, we present an exploratory study of fully general-relativistic hydrodynamic simulations using the public code Einstein Toolkit. The attention is focused on qualitative aspects of long-term postmerger evolution. As simplified test models, we use a moderately stiff Gamma=2 ideal-fluid equation of state and unmagnetized irrotational equal-mass binaries with three masses well below the threshold for prompt collapse. Our high resolution simulations generate postmerger "ringdown" gravitational wave (GW) signals of 170 ms, sustained by rotating massive NS remnants without collapsing to black holes. We observe that the high-density double-core structure inside the remnants gradually turns into a quasi-axisymmetric toroidal shape. It oscillates in a quasi-periodic manner and shrinks in size due to gravitational radiation. In the GW spectrograms, dominant double peaks persist throughout the postmerger simulations and slowly drift to higher frequencies. A new low-frequency peak emerges at about 100 ms after merger, owing to the growth of GW-driven unstable oscillation modes. The long-term effect of grid resolution is also investigated using the same initial model. Moreover, we comment on physical conditions that are favorable for the transient toroidal configuration to form, and discuss implication of our findings on future GW observation targeting rapidly rotating NSs.
  • The coalescence of a stellar-mass compact object together with an intermediate-mass black hole, also known as intermediate-mass-ratio inspiral, is usually not expected to be a viable gravitational wave source for the current ground-based gravitational wave detectors, due to the generally lower frequency of such source. In this paper, we adopt the effective-one-body formalism as the equation of motion, and obtain the accurately calculated gravitational waveforms by solving the Teukolsky equation in frequency-domain. We point out that high frequency modes of gravitational waves can be excited by large eccentricities of intermediate-mass-ratio inspirals. These high frequency modes can extend to more than 10 Hz, and enter the designed sensitive band of Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo. We propose that such kind of highly eccentric intermediate-mass-ratio inspirals could be feasible sources and potentially observable by the ground-based gravitational wave detectors, like the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo.
  • Binary black hole systems are among the most important sources for gravitational wave detection. And also they are good objects for theoretical research for general relativity. Gravitational waveform template is important to data analysis. Effective-one-body-numerical-relativity (EOBNR) model has played an essential role in the LIGO data analysis. For future space-based gravitational wave detection, many binary systems will admit somewhat orbit eccentricity. At the same time the eccentric binary is also an interesting topic for theoretical study in general relativity. In this paper we construct the first eccentric binary waveform model based on effective-one-body-numerical-relativity framework. Our basic assumption in the model construction is that the involved eccentricity is small. We have compared our eccentric EOBNR model to the circular one used in LIGO data analysis. We have also tested our eccentric EOBNR model against to another recently proposed eccentric binary waveform model; against to numerical relativity simulation results; and against to perturbation approximation results for extreme mass ratio binary systems. Compared to numerical relativity simulations with eccentricity as large as about 0.2, the overlap factor for our eccentric EOBNR model is better than 0.98 for all tested cases including spinless binary and spinning binary; equal mass binary and unequal mass binary. Hopefully our eccentric model can be the start point to develop a faithful template for future space-based gravitational wave detectors.
  • Neutron stars may sustain a non-axisymmetric deformation due to magnetic distortion and are potential sources of continuous gravitational waves (GWs) for ground-based interferometric detectors. With decades of searches using available GW detectors, no evidence of a GW signal from any pulsar has been observed. Progressively stringent upper limits of ellipticity have been placed on Galactic pulsars. In this work, we use the ellipticity inferred from the putative millisecond magnetars in short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) to estimate their detectability by current and future GW detectors. For $\sim 1$ ms magnetars inferred from the SGRB data, the detection horizon is $\sim 30$ Mpc and $\sim 600$ Mpc for advanced LIGO (aLIGO) and Einstein Telescope (ET), respectively. Using the ellipticity of SGRB millisecond magnetars as calibration, we estimate the ellipticity and gravitational wave strain of Galactic pulsars and magnetars assuming that the ellipticity is magnetic-distortion-induced. We find that the results are consistent with the null detection results of Galactic pulsars and magnetars with the aLIGO O1. We further predict that the GW signals from these pulsars/magnetars may not be detectable by the currently designed aLIGO detector. The ET detector may be able to detect some relatively low frequency signals ($<50$ Hz) from some of these pulsars. Limited by its design sensitivity, the eLISA detector seems not suitable for detecting the signals from Galactic pulsars and magnetars.
  • The direct detection of gravitational wave by Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory indicates the coming of the era of gravitational-wave astronomy and gravitational-wave cosmology. It is expected that more and more gravitational-wave events will be detected by currently existing and planned gravitational-wave detectors. The gravitational waves open a new window to explore the Universe and various mysteries will be disclosed through the gravitational-wave detection, combined with other cosmological probes. The gravitational-wave physics is not only related to gravitation theory, but also is closely tied to fundamental physics, cosmology and astrophysics. In this review article, three kinds of sources of gravitational waves and relevant physics will be discussed, namely gravitational waves produced during the inflation and preheating phases of the Universe, the gravitational waves produced during the first-order phase transition as the Universe cools down and the gravitational waves from the three phases: inspiral, merger and ringdown of a compact binary system, respectively. We will also discuss the gravitational waves as a standard siren to explore the evolution of the Universe.
  • In the near future, gravitational wave detection is set to become an important observational tool for astrophysics. It will provide us with an excellent means to distinguish different gravitational theories. In effective form, many gravitational theories can be cast into an f(R) theory. In this article, we study the dynamics and gravitational waveform of an equal-mass binary black hole system in f(R) theory. We reduce the equations of motion in f(R) theory to the Einstein-Klein-Gordon coupled equations. In this form, it is straightforward to modify our existing numerical relativistic codes to simulate binary black hole mergers in f(R) theory. We considered binary black holes surrounded by a shell of scalar field. We solve the initial data numerically using the Olliptic code. The evolution part is calculated using the extended AMSSNCKU code. Both codes were updated and tested to solve the problem of binary black holes in f(R) theory. Our results show that the binary black hole dynamics in f(R) theory is more complex than in general relativity. In particular, the trajectory and merger time are strongly affected. Via the gravitational wave, it is possible to constrain the quadratic part parameter of f(R) theory in the range |a_2|<10^{11} m^2 . In principle, a gravitational wave detector can distinguish between a merger of binary black hole in f(R) theory and the respective merger in general relativity. Moreover, it is possible to use gravitational wave detection to distinguish between f(R) theory and a non self-interacting scalar field model in general relativity.
  • This paper studies the whole process of gravitational collapse and accretion of a massless scalar field in asymptotically flat spacetime. Two kinds of initial configurations are considered. One is the initial data without black hole, the other contains a black hole. Under suitable initial conditions, we find that multi-horizon will appear, which means that the initial black hole formed by gravitational collapse or existing at the beginning will instantly expand and suddenly grow, rather than grows gradually in the accretion process. A new type of critical behavior is found around the instant expansion. The numerical computation shows that the critical exponents are universal.
  • In the centenary year of Einstein's General Theory of Relativity, this paper reviews the current status of gravitational wave astronomy across a spectrum which stretches from attohertz to kilohertz frequencies. Sect. 1 of this paper reviews the historical development of gravitational wave astronomy from Einstein's first prediction to our current understanding the spectrum. It is shown that detection of signals in the audio frequency spectrum can be expected very soon, and that a north-south pair of next generation detectors would provide large scientific benefits. Sect. 2 reviews the theory of gravitational waves and the principles of detection using laser interferometry. The state of the art Advanced LIGO detectors are then described. These detectors have a high chance of detecting the first events in the near future. Sect. 3 reviews the KAGRA detector currently under development in Japan, which will be the first laser interferometer detector to use cryogenic test masses. Sect. 4 of this paper reviews gravitational wave detection in the nanohertz frequency band using the technique of pulsar timing. Sect. 5 reviews the status of gravitational wave detection in the attohertz frequency band, detectable in the polarisation of the cosmic microwave background, and discusses the prospects for detection of primordial waves from the big bang. The techniques described in sects. 1-5 have already placed significant limits on the strength of gravitational wave sources. Sects. 6 and 7 review ambitious plans for future space based gravitational wave detectors in the millihertz frequency band. Sect. 6 presents a roadmap for development of space based gravitational wave detectors by China while sect. 7 discusses a key enabling technology for space interferometry known as time delay interferometry.
  • Part of a review paper entitled "Gravitational wave astronomy: the current status.", appeared in " Science China Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy 58.12 (2015): 1-41.
  • In this work we apply the Landau-Lifshitz pseudotensor flux formalism to the calculation of the total mass and the total angular momentum during the evolution of a binary black hole system. We also compare its performance with the traditional integrations for the global quantities. It shows that the advantage of the pseudotensor flux formalism is the smoothness of the numerical value of the global quantities, especially of the total angular momentum. Although the convergence behavior of the global quantities with the pseudotensor flux method is only comparable with the ones with the traditional method, the smoothness of its numerical value allows using a larger radius for surface integration to obtain more accurate result.
  • Different formulations of Einstein's equations used in numerical relativity can affect not only the stability but also the accuracy of numerical simulations. In the original Baumgarte-Shapiro-Shibata-Nakamura (BSSN) formulation, the loss of the angular momentum, $J$, is non-negligible in highly spinning single black hole evolutions. This loss also appears, usually right after the merger, in highly spinning binary black hole simulations, The loss of $J$ may be attributed to some unclear numerical dissipation. Reducing unphysical dissipation is expected to result in more stable and accurate evolutions. In the previous work \cite{yhlc12} we proposed several modifications which are able to prevent black hole evolutions from the unphysical dissipation, and the resulting simulations are more stable than in the traditional BSSN formulation. Specifically, these three modifications (M1, M2, and M3) enhance the effects of stability, hyperbolicity, and dissipation of the formulation. We experiment further in this work with these modifications, and demonstrate that these modifications improve the accuracy and also effectively suppress the loss of $J$, particularly in the black hole simulations with the initially large ratio of $J$ and the square of the ADM mass.
  • The present work reports on a feasibility study commissioned by the Chinese Academy of Sciences of China to explore various possible mission options to detect gravitational waves in space alternative to that of the eLISA/LISA mission concept. Based on the relative merits assigned to science and technological viability, a few representative mission options descoped from the ALIA mission are considered. A semi-analytic Monte Carlo simulation is carried out to understand the cosmic black hole merger histories starting from intermediate mass black holes at high redshift as well as the possible scientific merits of the mission options considered in probing the light seed black holes and their coevolution with galaxies in early Universe. The study indicates that, by choosing the armlength of the interferometer to be three million kilometers and shifting the sensitivity floor to around one-hundredth Hz, together with a very moderate improvement on the position noise budget, there are certain mission options capable of exploring light seed, intermediate mass black hole binaries at high redshift that are not readily accessible to eLISA/LISA, and yet the technological requirements seem to within reach in the next few decades for China.
  • Numerical relativity simulations of compact binaries with the Z4c and BSSNOK formulations are compared. The Z4c formulation is advantageous in every case considered. In simulations of non-vacuum spacetimes the constraint violations due to truncation errors are between one and three orders of magnitude lower in the Z4c evolutions. Improvements are also found in the accuracy of the computed gravitational radiation. For equal-mass irrotational binary neutron star evolutions we find that the absolute errors in phase and amplitude of the waveforms can be up to a factor of four smaller. The quality of the Z4c numerical data is also demonstrated by a remarkably accurate computation of the ADM mass from surface integrals. For equal-mass non-spinning binary puncture black hole evolutions we find that the absolute errors in phase and amplitude of the waveforms can be up to a factor of two smaller. In the same evolutions we find that away from the punctures the Hamiltonian constraint violation is reduced by between one and two orders of magnitude. Furthermore, the utility of gravitational radiation controlling, constraint preserving boundary conditions for the Z4c formulation is demonstrated. The evolution of spacetimes containing a single compact object confirm earlier results in spherical symmetry. The boundary conditions avoid spurious and non-convergent effects present in high resolution runs with either formulation with a more naive boundary treatment. We conclude that Z4c is preferable to BSSNOK for the numerical solution of the 3+1 Einstein equations with the puncture gauge.
  • We experiment with several new modifications for the Baumgarte-Shapiro-Shibata-Nakamura (BSSN) formulation of the Einstein field equations and demonstrate how these modifications affect the stability of numerical black hole evolution calculations. With these modifications, we evolve both single non-rotating excised Kerr-Schild black holes and punctured binary black holes, and obtain accurate and stable simulations.
  • Binary black hole (BBH) systems are usually located in the gravitational potential well formed by a massive black hole (BH), which is mostly located in the center of a galaxy. In most existing studies, the BBH systems are treated as isolated systems, while the effect of the background is ignored. The validity of the approximation is based on the belief that the background gravitational field from other sources is extremely weak compared with the strong gravitational field produced by the BBH itself during the evolution, and can be neglected in gravitational wave detection. However, it is still interesting to check how valid this approximation is. In this work, instead of simulating the three-BH problem with a fully relativistic treatment, we use a perturbational scheme to investigate the effect of the background gravitational potential on the evolution of a BBH, especially on the waveform of its gravitational radiation. Four scenarios are considered including the head-on collision and the inspiral-to-merger process of a BBH which is either freefalling towards or circularly orbiting around a third large BH. The head-on collision and the circular inspiral are two limits of all possible configurations. The existence of the background gravitational potential changes the arrival time of the gravitational wavefront of a BH, prolongs the wavelength, and increases the gravitational radiation energy. And most interestingly, the background gravitational potential induces the higher-order modes of the gravitational wave of a BBH. These interesting phenomena can be explained by the gravitational redshift effect and the change of eccentricity of a BBH's orbit from the background gravitational potential.
  • We study numerical stability of different approaches to the discretization of a conformal decomposition of the Z4 formulation of general relativity. We demonstrate that in the linear, constant coefficient regime a novel discretization for tensors is formally numerically stable with a method of lines time-integrator. We then perform a full set of apples with apples tests on the non-linear system, and thus present numerical evidence that both the new and standard discretizations are, in some sense, numerically stable in the non-linear regime. The results of the Z4c numerical tests are compared with those of BSSNOK evolutions. We typically do not employ the Z4c constraint damping scheme and find that in the robust stability and gauge wave tests the Z4c evolutions result in lower constraint violation at the same resolution as the BSSNOK evolutions. In the gauge wave tests we find that the Z4c evolutions maintain the desired convergence factor over many more light-crossing times than the BSSNOK tests. The difference in the remaining tests is marginal.
  • A new scheme for computing dynamical evolutions and gravitational radiations for intermediate-mass-ratio inspirals (IMRIs) based on an effective one-body (EOB) dynamics plus Teukolsky perturbation theory is built in this paper. In the EOB framework, the dynamics essentially affects the resulted gravitational waveform for binary compact star system. This dynamics includes two parts. One is the conservative part which comes from effective one-body reduction. The other part is the gravitational back reaction which contributes to the shrinking process of the inspiral of binary compact star system. Previous works used analytical waveform to construct this back reaction term. Since the analytical form is based on post-Newtonian expansion, the consistency of this term is always checked by numerical energy flux. Here we directly use numerical energy flux by solving the Teukolsky equation via the frequency-domain method to construct this back reaction term. And the conservative correction to the leading order terms in mass-ratio is included in the deformed-Kerr metric and the EOB Hamiltonian. We try to use this method to simulate not only quasi-circular adiabatic inspiral but also the nonadiabatic plunge phase. For several different spinning black holes, we demonstrate and compare the resulted dynamical evolutions and gravitational waveforms.
  • We present numerical evolutions of three equal-mass black holes using the moving puncture approach. We calculate puncture initial data for three black holes solving the constraint equations by means of a high-order multigrid elliptic solver. Using these initial data, we show the results for three black hole evolutions with sixth-order waveform convergence. We compare results obtained with the BAM and AMSS-NCKU codes with previous results. The approximate analytic solution to the Hamiltonian constraint used in previous simulations of three black holes leads to different dynamics and waveforms. We present some numerical experiments showing the evolution of four black holes and the resulting gravitational waveform.
  • We report on our code, in which the moving puncture method is applied and an adaptive/fixed mesh refinement is implemented, and on its preliminary performance on black hole simulations. Based on the BSSN formulation, up-to-date gauge conditions and the modifications of the formulation are also implemented and tested. In this work we present our primary results about the simulation of a single static black hole, of a moving single black hole, and of the head-on collision of a binary black hole system. For the static punctured black hole simulations, different modifications of the BSSN formulation are applied. It is demonstrated that both the currently used sets of modifications lead to a stable evolution. For cases of a moving punctured black hole with or without spin, we search for viable gauge conditions and study the effect of spin on the black hole evolution. Our results confirm previous results obtained by other research groups. In addition, we find a new gauge condition, which has not yet been adopted by any other researchers, which can also give stable and accurate black hole evolution calculations. We examine the performance of the code for the head-on collision of a binary black hole system, and the agreement of the gravitational waveform it produces with that obtained in other works. In order to understand qualitatively the influence of matter on the binary black hole collisions, we also investigate the same head-on collision scenarios but perturbed by a scalar field. The numerical simulations performed with this code not only give stable and accurate results that are consistent with the works by other numerical relativity groups, but also lead to the discovery of a new viable gauge condition, as well as clarify some ambiguities in the modification of the BSSN formulation.
  • The topic of interface effects in wave propagation has attracted great attention due to their theoretical significance and practical importance. In this paper we study nonlinear oscillatory systems consisting of two media separated by an interface, and find a novel phenomenon: interface can select a type of waves (ISWs). Under certain well defined parameter condition, these waves propagate in two different media with same frequency and same wave number; the interface of two media is transparent to these waves. The frequency and wave number of these interface-selected waves (ISWs) are predicted explicitly. Varying parameters from this parameter set, the wave numbers of two domains become different, and the difference increases from zero continuously as the distance between the given parameters and this parameter set increases from zero. It is found that ISWs can play crucial roles in practical problems of wave competitions, e.g., ISWs can suppress spirals and antispirals.
  • Waves propagating inwardly to the wave source are called antiwaves which have negative phase velocity. In this paper the phenomenon of negative phase velocity in oscillatory systems is studied on the basis of periodically paced complex Ginzbug-Laundau equation (CGLE). We figure out a clear physical picture on the negative phase velocity of these pacing induced waves. This picture tells us that the competition between the frequency $\omega_{out}$ of the pacing induced waves with the natural frequency $\omega_{0}$ of the oscillatory medium is the key point responsible for the emergence of negative phase velocity and the corresponding antiwaves. $\omega_{out}\omega_{0}>0$ and $|\omega_{out}|<|\omega_{0}|$ are the criterions for the waves with negative phase velocity. This criterion is general for one and high dimensional CGLE and for general oscillatory models. Our understanding of antiwaves predicts that no antispirals and waves with negative phase velocity can be observed in excitable media.