• Strongly anisotropic media where the principal components of electric permittivity or magnetic permeability tensors have opposite signs are termed as hyperbolic media. Such media support propagating electromagnetic waves with extremely large wavevectors exhibiting unique optical properties. However in all artificial and natural optical materials studied to date, the hyperbolic dispersion originates solely from the electric response. This restricts material functionality to one polarization of light and inhibits free-space impedance matching. Such restrictions can be overcome in media having components of opposite signs for both electric and magnetic tensors. Here we present the experimental demonstration of the magnetic hyperbolic dispersion in three-dimensional metamaterials. We measure metamaterial isofrequecy contours and reveal the topological phase transition between the elliptic and hyperbolic dispersion. In the hyperbolic regime, we demonstrate the strong enhancement of thermal emission, which becomes directional, coherent and polarized. Our findings show the possibilities for realizing efficient impedance-matched hyperbolic media for unpolarized light.
  • In standard quantum mechanics, complex numbers are used to describe the wavefunction. Although complex numbers have proven sufficient to predict the results of existing experiments, there is no apparent theoretical reason to choose them over real numbers or generalizations of complex numbers, i.e. hyper-complex numbers. Experiments performed to date have proven that real numbers are insufficient, but whether or not hyper-complex numbers are required remains an open question. Quantum theories based on hyper-complex numbers are one example of a post-quantum theory, which must be put on a firm experimental foundation. Here we experimentally probe hyper-complex quantum theories, by studying one of their deviations from complex quantum theory: the non-commutativity of phases. We do so by passing single photons through a Sagnac interferometer containing two physically different phases, having refractive indices of opposite sign. By showing that the phases commute with high precision, we place limits on a particular prediction of hyper-complex quantum theories.
  • Recently, two-dimensional (2D) materials have opened a new paradigm for fundamental physics explorations and device applications. Unlike gapless graphene, monolayer transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) has new optical functionalities for next generation ultra-compact electronic and opto-electronic devices. When TMDC crystals are thinned down to monolayers, they undergo an indirect to direct bandgap transition, making it an outstanding 2D semiconductor. Unique electron valley degree of freedom, strong light matter interactions and excitonic effects were observed. Enhancement of spontaneous emission has been reported on TMDC monolayers integrated with photonic crystal and distributed Bragg reflector microcavities. However, the coherent light emission from 2D monolayer TMDC has not been demonstrated, mainly due to that an atomic membrane has limited material gain volume and is lack of optical mode confinement. Here, we report the first realization of 2D excitonic laser by embedding monolayer tungsten disulfide (WS2) in a microdisk resonator. Using a whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonator with a high quality factor and optical confinement, we observed bright excitonic lasing in visible wavelength. The Si3N4/WS2/HSQ sandwich configuration provides a strong feedback and mode overlap with monolayer gain. This demonstration of 2D excitonic laser marks a major step towards 2D on-chip optoelectronics for high performance optical communication and computing applications.
  • Parity-time (PT) symmetry is a fundamental notion in quantum field theories. It has opened a new paradigm for non-Hermitian Hamiltonians ranging from quantum mechanics, electronics, to optics. In the realm of optics, optical loss is responsible for power dissipation, therefore typically degrading device performance such as attenuation of a laser beam. By carefully exploiting optical loss in the complex dielectric permittivity, however, recent exploration of PT symmetry revolutionizes our understandings in fundamental physics and intriguing optical phenomena such as exceptional points and phase transition that are critical for high-speed optical modulators. The interplay between optical gain and loss in photonic PT synthetic matters offers a new criterion of positively utilizing loss to efficiently manipulate gain and its associated optical properties. Instead of simply compensating optical loss in conventional lasers, for example, it is theoretically proposed that judiciously designed delicate modulation of optical loss and gain can lead to PT synthetic lasing that fundamentally broadens laser physics. Here, we report the first experimental demonstration of PT synthetic lasers. By carefully exploiting the interplay between gain and loss, we achieve degenerate eigen modes at the same frequency but with complex conjugate gain and loss coefficients. In contrast to conventional ring cavity lasers with multiple modes, the PT synthetic micro-ring laser exhibits an intrinsic single mode lasing: the non-threshold PT broken phase inherently associated in such a photonic system squeezes broadband optical gain into a single lasing mode regardless of the gain spectral bandwidth. This chip-scale semiconductor platform provides a unique route towards fundamental explorations of PT physics and next generation of optoelectronic devices for optical communications and computing.
  • Piezoelectricity offers precise and robust conversion between electricity and mechanical force. Here we report the first experimental evidence of piezoelectricity in a single layer of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) crystal as a result of inversion symmetry breaking of the atomic structure, with measured piezoelectric coefficient e11 = 2.9e-10 C/m. Through the angular dependence of electro-mechanical coupling, we uniquely determined the two-dimensional (2D) crystal orientation. We observed that only MoS2 membranes with odd number of layers exhibited piezoelectricity, in sharp contrast to the conventional materials. The piezoelectricity discovered in single molecular membrane promises scaling down of nano-electro-mechanical systems (NEMS) to single atomic unit cell - the ultimate material limit.