• Non-attractor inflation is known as the only single field inflationary scenario that can violate non-Gaussianity consistency relation with the Bunch-Davies vacuum state and generate large local non-Gaussianity. However, it is also known that the non-attractor inflation by itself is incomplete and should be followed by a phase of slow-roll attractor. Moreover, there is a transition process between these two phases. In the past literature, this transition was approximated as instant and the evolution of non-Gaussianity in this phase was not fully studied. In this paper, we follow the detailed evolution of the non-Gaussianity through the transition phase into the slow-roll attractor phase, considering different types of transition. We find that the transition process has important effect on the size of the local non-Gaussianity. We first compute the net contribution of the non-Gaussianities at the end of inflation in canonical non-attractor models. If the curvature perturbations keep evolving during the transition - such as in the case of smooth transition or some sharp transition scenarios - the $\mathcal{O}(1)$ local non-Gaussianity generated in the non-attractor phase can be completely erased by the subsequent evolution, although the consistency relation remains violated. In extremal cases of sharp transition where the super-horizon modes freeze immediately right after the end of the non-attractor phase, the original non-attractor result can be recovered. We also study models with non-canonical kinetic terms, and find that the transition can typically contribute a suppression factor in the squeezed bispectrum, but the final local non-Gaussianity can still be made parametrically large.
  • We study the power spectrum of quasi-single field inflation where strong coupling is considered. The contribution from the massive propagator can be divided into local and non-local contributions. The local one is the leading contribution and is power-law suppressed as a function of mass, while the non-local contribution is exponentially suppressed in the large mass limit. For the local contribution, it is possible to use the effective field theory approach to study the power spectrum in the strongly coupled region of the parameter space. For the non-local contribution, we developed a partial effective field theory method to simplify the calculation: When there are multiple massive propagators, one can fully compute it after integrating out all but one massive propagator by effective field theory. The result retains the "standard clock" signal, which is interesting for probing the expansion history of the primordial universe and the physics of a "cosmological collider". The error involved compared to the full calculation is power law suppressed by the effective mass of the heavy field.
  • The case of a rotating object traveling through viscous fluid appears in many phenomena like the banana ball and missile movement. In this work, we build a model to predict the trajectory of such rotating objects with near-cylinder geometry. The analytical expression of Magnus force is given and a wind tunnel experiment is carried out, which shows the Magnus force is well proportional to the product of angular velocity and centroid velocity. The trajectory prediction is consistent with the trajectory record experiment of Magnus glider, which implies the validity and robustness of this model.
  • We study the effects of the non-attractor initial conditions for the canonical single-field inflation. The non-attractor stage can last only several $e$-folding numbers, and should be followed by hilltop inflation. This two-stage evolution leads to large scale suppression in the primordial power spectrum, which is favored by recent observations. Moreover we give a detailed calculation of primordial non-Guassianity due to the "from non-attractor to slow-roll" transition, and find step features in the local and equilateral shapes. We conclude that a plateau-like inflaton potential with an initial non-attractor phase yields interesting features in both power spectrum and bispectrum.
  • In this study, we have investigated the fluctuations of particle motion, i.e. the non-affine motion, during the avalanche process, discovering a rich dynamics from the microscopic to the macroscopic scales. We find that there is strong correlation between the magnitude of the velocity fluctuation and the velocity magnitude in the spatial and temporal domains. The possible connection between this finding and STZ is discussed based on the direct measurement of the T1 events. In addition, the velocity magnitude of the system and the stress fluctuations of the system are strongly correlated temporally. Our finding will pose challenges to the development of more rigorous theories to describe the avalanche dynamics based on the microscopic approach. Moreover, our finding presents a plausible mechanism of the particle entrainment in a simple system.
  • We have investigated the spatiotemporal chaotic dynamics of unjamming and jamming of particles in a toy-model system -- a rotating drum partially filled with bidisperse disks to create avalanches. The magnitudes of the first Lyapunov vector $\delta u(t)$ and velocity $v(t)$ of particles are directly measured for the first time to yield insights into their spatial correlation $C_{\delta u,v}$, which is stronger near the unjamming but is weaker near the jamming transition, consistent with the recent work of Banigan et al., Nature Phys. $\bf{9}$, 288, (2013). $v(t)$ shows rich dynamics: it grows exponentially for unstable particles and keeps increasing despite stochastic interactions; after the maximum, it decays with large fluctuations. Hence the spatiotemporal chaotic dynamics of avalanche particles are entangled, causing temporal correlations of macroscopic quantities of the system. We propose a simple model for these observations.
  • Oxygen is in many ways a unique element: the only known diatomic molecular magnet and the capability of stabilization of the hitherto unexpected O8 cluster structure in its solid form at high pressure. Molecular dissociations upon compression as one of the fundamental problems were reported for other diatomic solids (e.g., H2, I2, Br2, and N2), but it remains elusive for solid oxygen, making oxygen an intractable system. We here report the theoretical prediction on the dissociation of molecular oxygen into a polymeric spiral chain O4 structure (\theta-O4) by using first-principles calypso method on crystal structure prediction. The \theta-O4 stabilizes above 2 TPa and has been observed as the third high pressure phase of sulfur (S-III). We find that the molecular O8 phase remains extremely stable in a large pressure range of 0.008 - 2 TPa, whose breakdown is driven by the pressure-induced instability of a transverse acoustic phonon mode at zone boundary, leading to the ultimate formation of \theta-O4. Remarkably, stabilization of \theta-O4 turns oxygen from a superconductor into an insulator with a wide band gap (approximately 5.9 eV) originating from the sp3-like hybridized orbitals of oxygen and the localization of valence electrons. (This is a pre-print version of the following article: Li Zhu et al, Spiral chain O4 form of dense oxygen, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. (2011), doi: 10.1073/pnas.1119375109, which has been published online at http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2011/12/27/1119375109 .)