• Spatially nonuniform strain is important for engineering the pseudomagnetic field and band structure of graphene. Despite the wide interest in strain engineering, there is still a lack of control on device-compatible strain patterns due to the limited understanding of the structure-strain relationship. Here, we study the effect of substrate corrugation and curvature on the strain profiles of graphene via combined experimental and theoretical studies of a model system: graphene on closely packed SiO2 nanospheres with different diameters (20-200 nm). Experimentally, via quantitative Raman analysis, we observe partial adhesion and wrinkle features and find that smaller nanospheres induce larger tensile strain in graphene, theoretically, molecular dynamics simulations confirm the same microscopic structure and size dependence of strain and reveal that a larger strain is caused by a stronger, inhomogeneous interaction force between smaller nanospheres and graphene. This molecular-level understanding of the strain mechanism is important for strain engineering of graphene and other two-dimensional materials.
  • We have created and studied artificial magnetic quasicrystals based on Penrose tiling patterns of interacting nanomagnets that lack the translational symmetry of spatially periodic artificial spin ices. Vertex-level degeneracy and frustration induced by the network topology of the Penrose pattern leads to a low energy configuration that we propose as a ground state. Topologically induced emergent frustration means that this ground state cannot be constructed from vertices in their ground states. It has two parts, a quasi-one-dimensional rigid "skeleton" that spans the entire pattern and is capable of long-range order, and "flippable" clusters of macrospins within it. These lead to macroscopic degeneracy for the array as a whole. Magnetic force microscopy imaging of Penrose tiling arrays revealed superdomains that are larger for more strongly coupled arrays. The superdomain size is larger after AC-demagnetisation and especially after annealing the array above its blocking temperature.
  • When strained beyond the linear regime, soft colloidal glasses yield to steady-state plastic flow in a way that is similar to the deformation of conventional amorphous solids. Due to the much larger size of the colloidal particles with respect to the atoms comprising an amorphous solid, colloidal glasses allow to obtain microscopic insight into the nature of the yielding transition, as we illustrate here combining experiments, atomistic simulations, and mesoscopic modeling. Our results unanimously show growing clusters of non-affine deformation percolating at yielding. In agreement with percolation theory, the spanning cluster is fractal with a fractal dimension d_f~2, and the correlation length diverges upon approaching the critical yield strain. These results indicate that percolation of highly non-affine particles is the hallmark of the yielding transition in disordered glassy systems.
  • Plastic yield of amorphous solids occurs by power law distributed slip avalanches whose universality is still debated. Determination of the power law exponents from experiments and molecular dynamics simulations is hampered by limited statistical sampling. On the other hand, while existing elasto-plastic depinning models give precise exponent values, these models to date have been limited to a scalar approximation of plasticity which is difficult to reconcile with the statistical isotropy of amorphous materials. Here we introduce for the first time a fully tensorial mesoscale model for the elasto-plasticity of disordered media that can not only reproduce a wide variety of shear band patterns observed experimentally for different deformation modes, but also captures the avalanche dynamics of plastic flow in disordered materials. Slip avalanches are characterized by universal distributions which are quantitatively different from mean field predictions, both regarding the exponents and regarding the form of the scaling functions, and which are independent of system dimensionality (2D vs 3D), boundary and loading conditions, and uni-or biaxiality of the stress state. We also measure average avalanche shapes, which are equally universal and inconsistent with mean field predictions. Our results provide strong evidence that the universality class of plastic yield in amorphous materials is distinct from that of mean field depinning.
  • Autocatalytic fibril nucleation has recently been proposed to be a determining factor for the spread of neurodegenerative diseases, but the same process could also be exploited to amplify minute quantities of protein aggregates in a diagnostic context. Recent advances in microfluidic technology allow analysis of protein aggregation in micron-scale samples potentially enabling such diagnostic approaches, but the theoretical foundations for the analysis and interpretation of such data are so far lacking. Here we study computationally the onset of protein aggregation in small volumes and show that the process is ruled by intrinsic fluctuations whose volume dependent distribution we also estimate theoretically. Based on these results, we develop a strategy to quantify in silico the statistical errors associated with the detection of aggregate containing samples. Our work opens a new perspective on the forecasting of protein aggregation in asymptomatic subjects.
  • Faithful segregation of genetic material during cell division requires alignment of chromosomes between two spindle poles and attachment of their kinetochores to each of the poles. Failure of these complex dynamical processes leads to chromosomal instability (CIN), a characteristic feature of several diseases including cancer. While a multitude of biological factors regulating chromosome congression and bi-orientation have been identified, it is still unclear how they are integrated so that coherent chromosome motion emerges from a large collection of random and deterministic processes. Here we address this issue by a three dimensional computational model of motor-driven chromosome congression and bi-orientation during mitosis. Our model reveals that successful cell division requires control of the total number of microtubules: if this number is too small bi-orientation fails, while if it is too large not all the chromosomes are able to congress. The optimal number of microtubules predicted by our model compares well with early observations in mammalian cell spindles. Our results shed new light on the origin of several pathological conditions related to chromosomal instability.
  • Motor proteins display widely different stepping patterns as they move on microtubule tracks, from the deterministic linear or helical motion performed by the protein kinesin to the uncoordinated random steps made by dynein. How these different strategies produce an efficient navigation system needed to ensure correct cellular functioning is still unclear. Here, we show by numerical simulations that deterministic and random motor steps yield different outcomes when random obstacles decorate the microtubule tracks: kinesin moves faster on clean tracks but its motion is strongly hindered on decorated tracks, while dynein is slower on clean tracks but more efficient in avoiding obstacles. Further simulations indicate that dynein's advantage on decorated tracks is due to its ability to step backwards. Our results explain how different navigation strategies are employed by the cell to optimize motor driven cargo transport.
  • Crystalline plasticity is strongly interlinked with dislocation mechanics and nowadays is relatively well understood. Concepts and physical models of plastic deformation in amorphous materials on the other hand - where the concept of linear lattice defects is not applicable - still are lagging behind. We introduce an eigenstrain-based finite element lattice model for simulations of shear band formation and strain avalanches. Our model allows us to study the influence of surfaces and finite size effects on the statistics of avalanches. We find that even with relatively complex loading conditions and open boundary conditions, critical exponents describing avalanche statistics are unchanged, which validates the use of simpler scalar lattice-based models to study these phenomena.
  • Delamination of coatings and thin films from substrates generates a fascinating variety of patterns, from circular blisters to wrinkles and labyrinth domains, in a way that is not completely understood. We report on large-scale numerical simulations of the universal problem of avoidance and coalescence of delamination wrinkles, focusing on a case study of graphene sheets on patterned substrates. By nucleating and growing wrinkles in a controlled way, we are able to characterize how their interactions, mediated by long-range stress fields, determine their formation and morphology. We also study how the interplay between geometry and stresses drives a universal transition from conformation to delamination when sheets are deposited on particle-decorated substrates. Our results are directly applicable to strain engineering of graphene and also uncover universal phenomena observed at all scales, as for example in geomembrane deposition.
  • We perform large scale simulations of a two dimensional lattice model for amorphous plasticity with random local yield stresses and long-range quadrupolar elastic interactions. We show that as the external stress increases towards the yielding phase transition, the scaling behavior of the avalanches crosses over from mean-field theory to a different universality class. This behavior is associated with strain localization, which significantly depends on the short-range properties of the interaction kernel.
  • Typically, the plastic yield stress of a sample is determined from a stress-strain curve by defining a yield strain and reading off the stress required to attain it. However, it is not a priori clear that yield strengths of microscale samples measured this way should display the correct finite size scaling. Here we study plastic yield as a depinning transition of a 1+1 dimensional interface, and consider how finite size effects depend on the choice of yield strain, as well as the presence of hardening and the strength of elastic coupling. Our results indicate that in sufficiently large systems, the choice of yield strain is unimportant, but in smaller systems one must take care to avoid spurious effects.
  • Quenched disorder affects how non-equilibrium systems respond to driving. In the context of artificial spin ice, an athermal system comprised of geometrically frustrated classical Ising spins with a two-fold degenerate ground state, we give experimental and numerical evidence of how such disorder washes out edge effects, and provide an estimate of disorder strength in the experimental system. We prove analytically that a sequence of applied fields with fixed amplitude is unable to drive the system to its ground state from a saturated state. These results should be relevant for other systems where disorder does not change the nature of the ground state.
  • We have performed a systematic study of the effects of field strength and quenched disorder on the driven dynamics of square artificial spin ice. We construct a network representation of the configurational phase space, where nodes represent the microscopic configurations and a directed link between node i and node j means that the field may induce a transition between the corresponding configurations. In this way, we are able to quantitatively describe how the field and the disorder affect the connectedness of states and the reversibility of dynamics. In particular, we have shown that for optimal field strengths, a substantial fraction of all states can be accessed using external driving fields, and this fraction is increased by disorder. We discuss how this relates to control and potential information storage applications for artificial spin ices.
  • The thermally-driven formation and evolution of vertex domains is studied for square artificial spin ice. A self consistent mean field theory is used to show how domains of ground state ordering form spontaneously, and how these evolve in the presence of disorder. The role of fluctuations is studied, using Monte Carlo simulations and analytical modelling. Domain wall dynamics are shown to be driven by a biasing of random fluctuations towards processes that shrink closed domains, and fluctuations within domains are shown to generate isolated small excitations, which may stabilise as the effective temperature is lowered. Domain dynamics and fluctuations are determined by interaction strengths, which are controlled by inter-element spacing. The role of interaction strength is studied via experiments and Monte Carlo simulations. Our mean field model is applicable to ferroelectric `spin' ice, and we show that features similar to that of magnetic spin ice can be expected, but with different characteristic temperatures and rates.
  • We report a novel approach to the question of whether and how the ground state can be achieved in square artificial spin ices where frustration is incomplete. We identify two types of disorder: quenched disorder in the island response to fields and disorder in the sequence of driving fields. Numerical simulations show that quenched disorder can lead to final states with lower energy, and disorder in the driving fields always lowers the final energy attained by the system. We use a network picture to understand these two effects: disorder in island responses creates new dynamical pathways, and disorder in driving fields allows more pathways to be followed.
  • The field-induced dynamics of artificial spin ice are determined in part by interactions between magnetic islands, and the switching characteristics of each island. Disorder in either of these affects the response to applied fields. Numerical simulations are used to show that disorder effects are determined primarily by the strength of disorder relative to inter-island interactions, rather than by the type of disorder. Weak and strong disorder regimes exist and can be defined in a quantitative way.
  • Local magnetic ordering in artificial spin ices is discussed from the point of view of how geometrical frustration controls dynamics and the approach to steady state. We discuss the possibility of using a particle picture based on vertex configurations to interpret time evolution of magnetic configurations. Analysis of possible vertex processes allows us to anticipate different behaviors for open and closed edges and the existence of different field regimes. Numerical simulations confirm these results and also demonstrate the importance of correlations and long range interactions in understanding particle population evolution. We also show that a mean field model of vertex dynamics gives important insights into finite size effects.