• We present and discuss the pulsational characteristics of the Delta Scuti star 38 Eri from photometric data obtained at two widely spaced epochs, partly from the ground (1998) and partly from space (MOST, 2011). We found 18 frequencies resolving the discrepancy among the previously published frequencies. Some of the frequencies appeared with different relative amplitudes at two epochs, however, we carried out investigation for amplitude variability for only the MOST data. Amplitude variability was found for one of three frequencies that satisfy the necessary frequency criteria for linear-combination or resonant-mode coupling. Checking the criteria of beating and resonant-mode coupling we excluded them as possible reason for amplitude variability. The two recently developed methods of rotational-splitting and sequence-search were applied to find regular spacings based only on frequencies. Doublets or incomplete multiplets with l=1, 2 and 3 were found in the rotational splitting search. In the sequence search method we identified four sequences. The averaged spacing, probably a combination of the large separation and the rotational frequency, is 1.724+/-0.092 d-1. Using the spacing and the scaling relation $\bar\rho = [0.0394, 0.0554]$ gcm$^{-3}$ was derived. The shift of the sequences proved to be the integer multiple of the rotational splitting spacing. Using the precise MOST frequencies and multi-colour photometry in a hybrid way, we identified four modes with l=1, two modes with l=2, two modes with l=3, and two modes as l=0 radial modes.
  • Hundreds of candidate hybrid pulsators of intermediate type A-F were revealed by the recent space missions. Hybrid pulsators allow to study the full stellar interiors, where p- and g-modes are simultaneously excited. The true hybrid stars must be identified since other processes, due to stellar multiplicity or rotation, might explain the presence of (some) low frequencies observed in their periodograms. We measured the radial velocities of 50 candidate Delta Sct - Gamma Dor hybrid stars from the Kepler mission with the Hermes/Ace spectrographs over a span of months to years. We aim to derive the fraction of binary and multiple systems and to provide an independent and homogeneous determination of the atmospheric properties and vsini for all targets. The objective is to identify the physical cause of the low frequencies. We computed 1-D cross-correlation functions (CCFs) in order to find the best parameters in terms of the number of components, spectral type and vsini for each target. Radial velocities were measured from spectrum synthesis and by using a 2-D cross-correlation technique in the case of double- and triple-lined systems. Fundamental parameters were determined by fitting (composite) synthetic spectra to the normalised median spectra corrected for the appropriate Doppler shifts. We report on the analysis of 478 high-resolution Hermes and 41 Ace spectra of A/F-type candidate hybrid pulsators from the Kepler field. We determined their radial velocities, projected rotational velocities, atmospheric properties and classified our targets based on the shape of the CCFs and the temporal behaviour of the radial velocities. We derived orbital solutions for seven new systems. Three long-period preliminary orbital solutions are confirmed by a photometric time-delay analysis. Finally, we determined a global multiplicity fraction of 27% in our sample of candidate hybrid stars.
  • In this contribution, we summarize the progress made in the investigation of binary candidates with an RR Lyrae component in 2016. We also discuss the actual status of the RRLyrBinCan database.
  • We aimed at collecting all known white dwarf pulsators with hydrogen-dominated atmospheres and list their main photometric and atmospheric parameters together with their pulsation periods and amplitudes observed at different epochs. For this purpose, we explored the pulsating white dwarf related literature with the systematic use of the SIMBAD and the NASA's Astrophysics Data System (ADS) databases. We summarized our results in four tables listing seven ZZ Ceti stars in detached white dwarf plus main-sequence binaries, seven extremely low-mass DA pulsators, three hot DAVs and 180 ZZ Ceti stars.
  • We report the discovery of a new Kepler first-overtone RR Lyrae pulsator, KIC 2831097. The pulsation shows large, 0.1 d amplitude, systematic phase variations that can be interpreted as light travel-time effect caused by orbital motion in a binary system, superimposed on a linear pulsation-period decrease. The assumed eccentric (e=0.47) orbit with the period of approximately 2 yr is the shortest among the non-eclipsing RR Lyrae binary candidates. The binary model gives a lowest estimate for the mass of the companion of 8.4 M_Sun, that places it among black hole candidates. Beside the first-overtone pulsation, numerous additional non-radial pulsation frequencies were also identified. We detected an ~47-d Blazhko-like irregular light-curve modulation.
  • We present a detailed analysis of the bright Cepheid-type variable star V1154 Cygni using 4 years of continuous observations by the Kepler space telescope. We detected 28 frequencies using standard Fourier transform method.We identified modulation of the main pulsation frequency and its harmonics with a period of ~159 d. This modulation is also present in the Fourier parameters of the light curve and the O-C diagram. We detected another modulation with a period of about 1160 d. The star also shows significant power in the low-frequency region that we identified as granulation noise. The effective timescale of the granulation agrees with the extrapolated scalings of red giant stars. Non-detection of solar-like oscillations indicates that the pulsation inhibits other oscillations. We obtained new radial velocity observations which are in a perfect agreement with previous years data, suggesting that there is no high mass star companion of V1154 Cygni. Finally, we discuss the possible origin of the detected frequency modulations.
  • G 207-9 and LP 133-144 are two rarely observed ZZ Ceti stars located in the middle and close to the blue edge of the ZZ Ceti instability domain, respectively. We aimed to observe them at least during one observing season at Konkoly Observatory with the purpose of extending the list of known pulsation modes for asteroseismic investigations and detect any significant changes in their pulsational behaviour. We determined five and three new normal modes of G 207-9 and LP 133-144, respectively. In LP 133-144, our frequency analysis also revealed that at least at three modes there are actually triplets with frequency separations of ~4 microHz. The rotational period of LP 133-144 based on the triplets is ~42 h. The preliminary asteroseismic fits of G 207-9 predict Teff=12 000 or 12 400 K and M*=0.855-0.870 MSun values for the effective temperature and mass of the star, depending on the assumptions on the spherical degree (l) values of the modes. These results are in agreement with the spectroscopic determinations. In the case of LP 133-144, the best-fitting models prefer Teff=11 800 K in effective temperature and M*>=0.71 MSun stellar masses, which are more than 0.1 MSun larger than the spectroscopic value.
  • We present our preliminary results on the asteroseismological investigations of the ZZ Ceti star GD 244. We used literature values of the effective temperature and surface gravity and utilized the White Dwarf Evolution Code of Bischoff-Kim, Montgomery and Winget (2008, ApJ, 675, 1512) to build our model grid for the seismological analysis. Five observed pulsational modes published up to now were used to find acceptable model solutions. We found that the best model fits have masses between 0.61 and 0.74 M_solar and constitute two groups with hydrogen layer masses of either ~10^{-5} or 10^{-6} M_solar. Based on a statistical analysis of a larger sample of possible model solutions, we assume that the mass of the star is below ~0.68 M_solar and the oxygen content in the centre is less than 60 percent.
  • Previous studies of GD 244 revealed seven pulsation frequencies (two doublets and three single periods) in the light variations of the star. The data obtained at McDonald Observatory between 2003 and 2006, and our additional measurements in 2006 and 2007 at Konkoly Observatory, allow the investigation of the long-term pulsational behaviour of GD 244. We found that the 307.1 s period component of one of the doublets show long-term, periodic amplitude modulation with a time scale of ~740 days. Possible explanations are that nonlinear resonant mode coupling is operating among the rotationally split frequency components, or two modes, unresolved in the yearly data are excited at ~307.1 s. This is the first time that such long-term periodic amplitude modulation is published on a ZZ Ceti star.
  • Context: Several hundred candidate hybrid pulsators of type A-F have been identified from space-based observations. Their large number allows both statistical analyses and detailed investigations of individual stars. This offers the opportunity to study the full interior of the genuine hybrids, in which both low-radial-order p- and high-order g-modes are self-excited at the same time. However, a few other physical processes can also be responsible for the observed hybrid nature, related to binarity or to surface inhomogeneities. The finding that most delta Scuti stars also show long-period light variations represents a real challenge for theory. Methods: Fourier analysis of all the available Kepler light curves. Investigation of the frequency and period spacings. Determination of the stellar physical parameters from spectroscopic observations. Modelling of the transit events. Results: The Fourier analysis of the Kepler light curves revealed 55 significant frequencies clustered into two groups, which are separated by a gap between 15 and 27 c/d. The light variations are dominated by the beating of two dominant frequencies located at around 4 c/d. The amplitudes of these two frequencies show a monotonic long-term trend. The frequency spacing analysis revealed two possibilities: the pulsator is either a highly inclined moderate rotator (v~70 km/s, i > 70 deg) or a fast rotator (v~200 km/s) with i~20 deg. The transit analysis disclosed that the transit events which occur with a ~197 c/d period may be caused by a 1.6 R_Jup body orbiting a fainter star, which would be spatially coincident with KIC 9533489.
  • Context: KUV 05134+2605 is one of the 21 pulsating DB white dwarfs (V777 Her or DBV variables) known so far. The detailed investigation of the short-period and low-amplitude pulsations of these relatively faint targets requires considerable observational efforts from the ground, long-term single-site or multisite observations. The observed amplitudes of excited modes undergo short-term variations in many cases, which makes the determination of pulsation modes difficult. Methods: We re-analysed the data already published, and collected new measurements. We compared the frequency content of the different datasets from the different epochs and performed various tests to check the reliability of the frequency determinations. The mean period spacings were investigated with linear fits to the observed periods, Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Inverse Variance significance tests, and Fourier analysis of different period sets, including a Monte Carlo test simulating the effect of alias ambiguities. We employed fully evolutionary DB white dwarf models for the asteroseismic investigations. Results: We identified 22 frequencies between 1280 and 2530 microHz. These form 12 groups, which suggests at least 12 possible frequencies for the asteroseismic investigations. Thanks to the extended observations, KUV 05134+2605 joined the group of rich white dwarf pulsators. We identified one triplet and at least one doublet with a ~9 microHz frequency separation, from which we derived a stellar rotation period of 0.6 d. We determined the mean period spacings of ~31 and ~18 s for the modes we propose as dipole and quadrupole, respectively. We found an excellent agreement between the stellar mass derived from the l=1 period spacing and the period-to-period fits, all providing M_* = 0.84-0.85 M_Sun solutions. Our study suggests that KUV 05134+2605 is the most massive amongst the known V777 Her stars.
  • Context: The central star of the HR 8799 system is a gamma Doradus-type pulsator. The system harbours four planetary-mass companions detected by direct imaging, and is a good solar system analogue. The masses of the companions are not known accurately, because the estimation depends strongly on the age of the system, which is also not known with sufficient accuracy. Asteroseismic studies of the star might help to better constrain the age of HR 8799. We organized an extensive photometric and multi-site spectroscopic observing campaign for studying the pulsations of the central star. Aims: The aim of the present study is to investigate the pulsation properties of HR 8799 in detail via the ultra-precise 47-d-long nearly continuous photometry obtained with the MOST space telescope, and to find as many independent pulsation modes as possible, which is the prerequisite of an asteroseismic age determination. Methods: We carried out Fourier analysis of the wide-band photometric time series. Results: We find that resonance and sudden amplitude changes characterize the pulsation of HR 8799. The dominant frequency is always at f1 = 1.978 c/d. Many multiples of one ninth of the dominant frequency appear in the Fourier spectrum of the MOST data: n/9 f1, where n={1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, 14, 17, 18}. Our analysis also reveals that many of these peaks show strong amplitude decrease and phase variations even on the 47-d time-scale. The dependencies between the pulsation frequencies of HR 8799 make the planned subsequent asteroseismic analysis rather difficult. We point out some resemblance between the light curve of HR 8799 and the modulated pulsation light curves of Blazhko RR Lyrae stars.
  • We carried out an extensive observational study of the Slowly Pulsating B (SPB) star, HD 25558. The ~2000 spectra obtained at different observatories, the ground-based and MOST satellite light curves revealed that this object is a double-lined spectroscopic binary with an orbital period of about 9 years. The observations do not allow the inference of an orbital solution. We determined the physical parameters of the components, and found that both lie within the SPB instability strip. Accordingly, both show line-profile variations due to stellar pulsations. Eleven independent frequencies were identified in the data. All the frequencies were attributed to one of the two components based on Pixel-by-pixel variability analysis of the line profiles. Spectroscopic and photometric mode identification was also performed for the frequencies of both stars. These results suggest that the inclination and rotation of the two components are rather different. The primary is a slow rotator with ~6 d period, seen at ~60 deg inclination, while the secondary rotates fast with ~1.2 d period, and is seen at ~20 inclination. Spectropolarimetric measurements revealed that the secondary component has a magnetic field with at least a few hundred Gauss strength, while no magnetic field can be detected in the primary.
  • The high accuracy of space data increased the number of the periodicities determined for pulsating variable stars, but the mode identification is still a critical point in the non-asymptotic regime. We use regularities in frequency spacings for identifying the pulsation modes of the recently discovered delta Sct star ID 102749568. In addition to analysing CoRoT light curves (15252 datapoints spanning 131 days), we obtained and analysed both spectroscopic and extended multi-colour photometric data. We applied standard tools (MUFRAN, Period04, SigSpec, and FAMIAS) for time-series analysis. A satisfactory light-curve fit was obtaining by means of 52 independent modes and 15 combination terms. The frequency spacing revealed distinct peaks around large (25.55-31.43 microHz), intermediate (9.80, 7.66 microHz), and low (2.35 microHz) separations. We directly identified 9 modes, and the l and n values of other three modes were extrapolated. The combined application of spectroscopy, multi-colour photometry, and modelling yielded the precise physical parameters and confirmed the observational mode identification. The large separation constrained the log g and related quantities. The dominant mode is the radial first overtone.
  • We present the results of a comparative period search on different time-scales and modelling of the ZZ Ceti (DAV) star GD 154. We determined six frequencies as normal modes and four rotational doublets around the ones having the largest amplitude. Two normal modes at 807.62 and 861.56 microHz have never been reported before. A rigorous test revealed remarkable intrinsic amplitude variability of frequencies at 839.14 and 861.56 microHz over a 50 d time-scale. In addition, the multimode pulsation changed to monoperiodic pulsation with an 843.15 microHz dominant frequency at the end of the observing run. The 2.76 microHz average rotational split detected led to a determination of a 2.1 d rotational period for GD 154. We searched for model solutions with effective temperatures and log g close to the spectroscopically determined ones. The best-fitting models resulting from the grid search have M_H between 6.3 x 10^-5 and 6.3 x 10^-7 M*, which means thicker hydrogen layer than the previous studies suggested. Our investigations show that mode trapping does not necessarily operate in all of the observed modes and the best candidate for a trapped mode is at 2484 microHz.
  • We constrain the distribution of calcium across the surface of the white dwarf star G29-38 by combining time series spectroscopy from Gemini-North with global time series photometry from the Whole Earth Telescope. G29-38 is actively accreting metals from a known debris disk. Since the metals sink significantly faster than they mix across the surface, any inhomogeneity in the accretion process will appear as an inhomogeneity of the metals on the surface of the star. We measure the flux amplitudes and the calcium equivalent width amplitudes for two large pulsations excited on G29-38 in 2008. The ratio of these amplitudes best fits a model for polar accretion of calcium and rules out equatorial accretion.
  • The ZZ Ceti star KUV 02464+3239 was observed over a whole season at the mountain station of Konkoly Observatory. A rigorous frequency analysis revealed 6 certain periods between 619 and 1250 seconds, with no shorter period modes present. We use the observed periods, published effective temperature and surface gravity, along with the model grid code of Bischoff-Kim, Montgomery and Winget (2008) to perform a seismological analysis. We find acceptable model fits with masses between 0.60 and 0.70 M_Sun. The hydrogen layer mass of the acceptable models are almost always between 10^-4 and 10^-6 M_*. In addition to our seismological results, we also show our analysis of individual light curve segments. Considering the non-sinusoidal shape of the light curve and the Fourier spectra of segments showing large amplitude variations, the importance of non-linear effects in the pulsation is clearly seen.
  • We present the results on period search and modeling of the cool DAV star KUV 02464+3239. Our observations resolved the multiperiodic pulsational behaviour of the star. In agreement with its position near the red edge of the DAV instability strip, it shows large amplitude, long period pulsation modes, and has a strongly non-sinusoidal light curve. We determined 6 frequencies as normal modes and revealed remarkable short-term amplitude variations. A rigorous test was performed for the possible source of amplitude variation: beating of modes, effect of noise, unresolved frequencies or rotational triplets. Among the best-fit models resulting from a grid search, we selected 3 that gave l=1 solutions for the largest amplitude modes. These models had masses of 0.645, 0.650 and 0.680 M_Sun. The 3 `favoured' models have M_H between 2.5x10^-5 - 6.3x10^-6 M_* and give 14.2 - 14.8 mas seismological parallax. The 0.645 M_Sun (11400 K) model also matches the spectroscopic log g and T_eff within 1 sigma. We investigated the possibility of mode trapping and concluded that while it can explain high amplitude modes, it is not required.
  • The known beta Cephei star HD 180642 was observed by the CoRoT satellite in 2007. From the very high-precision light curve, its pulsation frequency spectrum could be derived for the first time (Degroote and collaborators). In this paper, we obtain additional constraints for forthcoming asteroseismic modeling of the target. Our results are based on both extensive ground-based multicolour photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy. We determine T_eff = 24 500+-1000 K and log g = 3.45+-0.15 dex from spectroscopy. The derived chemical abundances are consistent with those for B stars in the solar neighbourhood, except for a mild nitrogen excess. A metallicity Z = 0.0099+-0.0016 is obtained. Three modes are detected in photometry. The degree l is unambiguously identified for two of them: l = 0 and l = 3 for the frequencies 5.48694 1/d and 0.30818 1/d, respectively. The radial mode is non-linear and highly dominant with an amplitude in the U-filter about 15 times larger than the strongest of the other modes. For the third frequency of 7.36673 1/d found in photometry, two possibilities remain: l = 0 or 3. In the radial velocities, the dominant radial mode presents a so-called stillstand but no clear evidence of the existence of shocks is observed. Four low-amplitude modes are found in spectroscopy and one of them, with frequency 8.4079 1/d, is identified as (l,m)=(3,2). Based on this mode identification, we finally deduce an equatorial rotational velocity of 38+-15 km/s.
  • We report on the analysis of 436.1 hrs of nearly continuous high-speed photometry on the pulsating DB white dwarf GD358 acquired with the Whole Earth Telescope (WET) during the 2006 international observing run, designated XCOV25. The Fourier transform (FT) of the light curve contains power between 1000 to 4000 microHz, with the dominant peak at 1234 microHz. We find 27 independent frequencies distributed in 10 modes, as well as numerous combination frequencies. Our discussion focuses on a new asteroseismological analysis of GD358, incorporating the 2006 data set and drawing on 24 years of archival observations. Our results reveal that, while the general frequency locations of the identified modes are consistent throughout the years, the multiplet structure is complex and cannot be interpreted simply as l=1 modes in the limit of slow rotation. The high k multiplets exhibit significant variability in structure, amplitude and frequency. Any identification of the m components for the high k multiplets is highly suspect. The k=9 and 8 modes typically do show triplet structure more consistent with theoretical expectations. The frequencies and amplitudes exhibit some variability, but much less than the high k modes. Analysis of the k=9 and 8 multiplet splittings from 1990 to 2008 reveal a long-term change in multiplet splittings coinciding with the 1996 "sforzando" event, where GD358 dramatically altered its pulsation characteristics on a timescale of hours. We explore potential implications, including the possible connections between convection and/or magnetic fields and pulsations. We suggest future investigations, including theoretical investigations of the relationship between magnetic fields, pulsation, growth rates, and convection.
  • New observations of GD 99 are analysed. The unusual pulsation behaviour, showing both long and short periods, has been confirmed. All the available periods show a grouping of short and long period modes with roughly regular spacing. If we interpret the groups separately, a binary nature can be a possible explanation as in the similar cases of WD 2350-0054 and G29-38.
  • Preliminary results on KUV 02464+3239, a pulsating DA white dwarf are presented. Located near the red edge of the DAV instability strip, KUV 02464+3239 shows large amplitude and long period pulsation modes. Up to now only one mode was known from a 50-minute-long light curve. Our more extended observations allowed the identification of three additional frequencies. The presence of previously known harmonics were confirmed and weak subharmonics are also noticeable at some parts of the light curve. This suggests the dominance of nonlinear pulsation effects from time to time.