• The aim of the present work is to measure the $^{121}$Sb($\alpha,\gamma$)$^{125}$I, $^{121}$Sb($\alpha$,n)$^{124}$I, and $^{123}$Sb($\alpha$,n)$^{126}$I reaction cross sections. The $\alpha$-induced reactions on natural and enriched antimony targets were investigated using the activation technique. The ($\alpha$,$\gamma$) cross sections of $^{121}$Sb were measured and are reported for first time. To determine the cross section of the $^{121}$Sb($\alpha$,$\gamma$)$^{125}$I, $^{121}$Sb($\alpha$,n)$^{124}$I, and $^{123}$Sb($\alpha$,n)$^{126}$I reactions, the yields of $\gamma$-rays following the $\beta$-decay of the reaction products were measured. For the measurement of the lowest cross sections, the characteristic X-rays were counted with a LEPS (Low Energy Photon Spectrometer) detector. The cross section of the $^{121}$Sb($\alpha$,$\gamma$)$^{125}$I, $^{121}$Sb($\alpha$,n)$^{124}$I and $^{123}$Sb($\alpha$,n)$^{126}$I reactions were measured with high precision in an energy range between 9.74 MeV to 15.48 MeV, close to the astrophysically relevant energy window. The results are compared with the predictions of statistical model calculations. The ($\alpha$,n) data show that the $\alpha$ widths are predicted well for these reactions. The ($\alpha$,$\gamma$) results are overestimated by the calculations but this is due to the applied neutron- and $\gamma$ widths. Relevant for the astrophysical reaction rate is the $\alpha$ width used in the calculations.While for other reactions the $\alpha$ widths seem to have been overestimated and their energy dependence was not described well in the measured energy range, this is not the case for the reactions studied here. The result is consistent with the proposal that additional reaction channels, such as Coulomb excitation, may have led to the discrepancies found in other reactions.
  • The experimental study of nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest is greatly facilitated by a low-background, high-luminosity setup. The Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA) 400 kV accelerator offers ultra-low cosmic-ray induced background due to its location deep underground in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (INFN-LNGS), Italy, and high intensity, 250-500 $\mu$A, proton and $\alpha$ ion beams. In order to fully exploit these features, a high-purity, recirculating gas target system for isotopically enriched gases is coupled to a high-efficiency, six-fold optically segmented bismuth germanate (BGO) $\gamma$-ray detector. The beam intensity is measured with a beam calorimeter with constant temperature gradient. Pressure and temperature measurements have been carried out at several positions along the beam path, and the resultant gas density profile has been determined. Calibrated $\gamma$-intensity standards and the well-known $E_p$ = 278 keV $\mathrm{^{14}N(p,\gamma)^{15}O}$ resonance were used to determine the $\gamma$-ray detection efficiency and to validate the simulation of the target and detector setup. As an example, the recently measured resonance at $E_p$ = 189.5 keV in the $^{22}$Ne(p,$\gamma$)$^{23}$Na reaction has been investigated with high statistics, and the $\gamma$-decay branching ratios of the resonance have been determined.
  • In a recent work, the cross section measurement of the 64Zn(p,alpha)61Cu reaction was used to prove that the standard alpha-nucleus optical potentials used in astrophysical network calculation fail to reproduce the experimental data at energies relevant for heavy element nucleosynthesis. In the present paper the analysis of the obtained experimental data is continued by comparing the results with the predictions using different parameters. It is shown that the recently suggested modification of the standard optical potential leads to a better description of the data.
  • The stellar reaction rates of radiative $\alpha$-capture reactions on heavy isotopes are of crucial importance for the $\gamma$ process network calculations. These rates are usually derived from statistical model calculations, which need to be validated, but the experimental database is very scarce. This paper presents the results of $\alpha$-induced reaction cross section measurements on iridium isotopes carried out at first close to the astrophysically relevant energy region. Thick target yields of $^{191}$Ir($\alpha$,$\gamma$)$^{195}$Au, $^{191}$Ir($\alpha$,n)$^{194}$Au, $^{193}$Ir($\alpha$,n)$^{196m}$Au, $^{193}$Ir($\alpha$,n)$^{196}$Au reactions have been measured with the activation technique between E$_\alpha = 13.4$ MeV and 17 MeV. For the first time the thick target yield was determined with X-ray counting. This led to a previously unprecedented sensitivity. From the measured thick target yields, reaction cross sections are derived and compared with statistical model calculations. The recently suggested energy-dependent modification of the $\alpha$+nucleus optical potential gives a good description of the experimental data.
  • The 17O(p,g)18F reaction plays an important role in hydrogen burning processes in different stages of stellar evolution. The rate of this reaction must therefore be known with high accuracy in order to provide the necessary input for astrophysical models. The cross section of 17O(p,g)18F is characterized by a complicated resonance structure at low energies. Experimental data, however, is scarce in a wide energy range which increases the uncertainty of the low energy extrapolations. The purpose of the present work is therefore to provide consistent and precise cross section values in a wide energy range. The cross section is measured using the activation method which provides directly the total cross section. With this technique some typical systematic uncertainties encountered in in-beam gamma-spectroscopy experiments can be avoided. The cross section was measured between 500 keV and 1.8 MeV proton energies with a total uncertainty of typically 10%. The results are compared with earlier measurements and it is found that the gross features of the 17O(p,g)18F excitation function is relatively well reproduced by the present data. Deviation of roughly a factor of 1.5 is found in the case of the total cross section when compared with the only one high energy dataset. At the lowest measured energy our result is in agreement with two recent datasets within one standard deviation and deviates by roughly two standard deviations from a third one. An R-matrix analysis of the present and previous data strengthen the reliability of the extrapolated zero energy astrophysical S-factor. Using an independent experimental technique, the literature cross section data of 17O(p,g)18F is confirmed in the energy region of the resonances while lower direct capture cross section is recommended at higher energies. The present dataset provides a constraint for the theoretical cross sections.
  • Stardust grains recovered from meteorites provide high-precision snapshots of the isotopic composition of the stellar environment in which they formed. Attributing their origin to specific types of stars, however, often proves difficult. Intermediate-mass stars of 4-8 solar masses are expected to contribute a large fraction of meteoritic stardust. However, no grains have been found with characteristic isotopic compositions expected from such stars. This is a long-standing puzzle, which points to serious gaps in our understanding of the lifecycle of stars and dust in our Galaxy. Here we show that the increased proton-capture rate of $^{17}$O reported by a recent underground experiment leads to $^{17}$O/$^{16}$O isotopic ratios that match those observed in a population of stardust grains, for proton-burning temperatures of 60-80 million K. These temperatures are indeed achieved at the base of the convective envelope during the late evolution of intermediate-mass stars of 4-8 solar masses, which reveals them as the most likely site of origin of the grains. This result provides the first direct evidence that these stars contributed to the dust inventory from which the Solar System formed.
  • Background $\alpha$-nucleus potentials play an essential role for the calculation of $\alpha$-induced reaction cross sections at low energies in the statistical model. Uncertainties of these calculations are related to ambiguities in the adjustment of the potential parameters to experimental elastic scattering angular distributions (typically at higher energies) and to the energy dependence of the effective $\alpha$-nucleus potentials. Purpose The present work studies cross sections of $\alpha$-induced reactions for $^{64}$Zn at low energies and their dependence on the chosen input parameters of the statistical model calculations. The new experimental data from the recent Atomki experiments allow for a $\chi^2$-based estimate of the uncertainties of calculated cross sections at very low energies. Method The recent data for the ($\alpha$,$\gamma$), ($\alpha$,$n$), and ($\alpha$,$p$) reactions on $^{64}$Zn are compared to calculations in the statistical model. A survey of the parameter space of the widely used computer code TALYS is given, and the properties of the obtained $\chi^2$ landscape are discussed. Results The best fit to the experimental data at low energies shows $\chi^2/F \approx 7.7$ per data point which corresponds to an average deviation of about 30% between the best fit and the experimental data. Several combinations of the various ingredients of the statistical model are able to reach a reasonably small $\chi^2/F$, not exceeding the best-fit result by more than a factor of 2. Conclusions The present experimental data for $^{64}$Zn in combination with the statistical model calculations allow to constrain the astrophysical reaction rate within about a factor of 2. However, the significant excess of $\chi^2/F$ of the best-fit from unity asks for further improvement of the statistical model calculations and in particular the $\alpha$-nucleus potential.
  • Background: alpha-nucleus potentials play an essential role for the calculation of alpha-induced reaction cross sections at low energies in the statistical model... Purpose: The present work studies the total reaction cross section sigma_reac of alpha-induced reactions at low energies which can be determined from the elastic scattering angular distribution or from the sum over the cross sections of all open non-elastic channels. Method: Elastic and inelastic 64Zn(a,a)64Zn angular distributions were measured at two energies around the Coulomb barrier at 12.1 MeV and 16.1 MeV. Reaction cross sections of the (a,g), (a,n), and (a,p) reactions were measured at the same energies using the activation technique. The contributions of missing non-elastic channels were estimated from statistical model calculations. Results: The total reaction cross sections from elastic scattering and from the sum of the cross sections over all open non-elastic channels agree well within the uncertainties. This finding confirms the consistency of the experimental data. At the higher energy of 16.1 MeV, the predicted significant contribution of compound-inelastic scattering to the total reaction cross section is confirmed experimentally. As a by-product it is found that most recent global alpha-nucleus potentials are able to describe the reaction cross sections for 64Zn around the Coulomb barrier. Conclusions: Total reaction cross sections of alpha-induced reactions can be well determined from elastic scattering angular distributions. The present study proves experimentally that the total cross section from elastic scattering is identical to the sum of non-elastic reaction cross sections. Thus, the statistical model can reliably be used to distribute the total reaction cross section among the different open channels.
  • Context. Material processed by the CNO cycle in stellar interiors is enriched in 17O. When mixing processes from the stellar surface reach these layers, as occurs when stars become red giants and undergo the first dredge up, the abundance of 17O increases. Such an occurrence explains the drop of the 16O/17O observed in RGB stars with mass larger than 1.5 M_\solar. As a consequence, the interstellar medium is continuously polluted by the wind of evolved stars enriched in 17O . Aims. Recently, the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA) collaboration released an improved rate of the 17O(p,alpha)14N reaction. In this paper we discuss the impact that the revised rate has on the 16O/17O ratio at the stellar surface and on 17O stellar yields. Methods. We computed stellar models of initial mass between 1 and 20 M_\solar and compared the results obtained by adopting the revised rate of the 17O(p,alpha)14N to those obtained using previous rates. Results. The post-first dredge up 16O/17O ratios are about 20% larger than previously obtained. Negligible variations are found in the case of the second and the third dredge up. In spite of the larger 17O(p,alpha)14N rate, we confirm previous claims that an extra-mixing process on the red giant branch, commonly invoked to explain the low carbon isotopic ratio observed in bright low-mass giant stars, marginally affects the 16O/17O ratio. Possible effects on AGB extra-mixing episodes are also discussed. As a whole, a substantial reduction of 17O stellar yields is found. In particular, the net yield of stars with mass ranging between 2 and 20 M_\solar is 15 to 40% smaller than previously estimated. Conclusions. The revision of the 17O(p,alpha)14N rate has a major impact on the interpretation of the 16O/17O observed in evolved giants, in stardust grains and on the 17O stellar yields.
  • The $^{22}$Ne(p,$\gamma$)$^{23}$Na reaction is the most uncertain process in the neon-sodium cycle of hydrogen burning. At temperatures relevant for nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars and classical novae, its uncertainty is mainly due to a large number of predicted but hitherto unobserved resonances at low energy. Purpose: A new direct study of low energy $^{22}$Ne(p,$\gamma$)$^{23}$Na resonances has been performed at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA), in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Italy. Method: The proton capture on $^{22}$Ne was investigated in direct kinematics, delivering an intense proton beam to a $^{22}$Ne gas target. $\gamma$ rays were detected with two high-purity germanium detectors enclosed in a copper and lead shielding suppressing environmental radioactivity. Results: Three resonances at 156.2 keV ($\omega\gamma$ = (1.48\,$\pm$\,0.10)\,$\cdot$\,10$^{-7}$ eV), 189.5 keV ($\omega\gamma$ = (1.87\,$\pm$\,0.06)\,$\cdot$\,10$^{-6}$ eV) and 259.7 keV ($\omega\gamma$ = (6.89\,$\pm$\,0.16)\,$\cdot$\,10$^{-6}$ eV) proton beam energy, respectively, have been observed for the first time. For the levels at 8943.5, 8975.3, and 9042.4 keV excitation energy corresponding to the new resonances, the $\gamma$-decay branching ratios have been precisely measured. Three additional, tentative resonances at 71, 105 and 215 keV proton beam energy, respectively, were not observed here. For the strengths of these resonances, experimental upper limits have been derived that are significantly more stringent than the upper limits reported in the literature. Conclusions: Based on the present experimental data and also previous literature data, an updated thermonuclear reaction rate is provided in tabular and parametric form. The new reaction rate is significantly higher than previous evaluations at temperatures of 0.08-0.3 GK.
  • The synthesis of heavy, proton rich isotopes in the astrophysical gamma-process proceeds through photodisintegration reactions. For the improved understanding of the process, the rates of the involved nuclear reactions must be known. The reaction 128Ba(g,a)124Xe was found to affect the abundance of the p nucleus 124Xe. Since the stellar rate for this reaction cannot be determined by a measurement directly, the aim of the present work was to measure the cross section of the inverse 124Xe(a,g)128Ba reaction and to compare the results with statistical model predictions. Of great importance is the fact that data below the (a,n) threshold was obtained. Studying simultaneously the 124Xe(a,n)127Ba reaction channel at higher energy allowed to further identify the source of a discrepancy between data and prediction. The 124Xe + alpha cross sections were measured with the activation method using a thin window 124Xe gas cell. The studied energy range was between E = 11 and 15 MeV close above the astrophysically relevant energy range. The obtained cross sections are compared with statistical model calculations. The experimental cross sections are smaller than standard predictions previously used in astrophysical calculations. As dominating source of the difference, the theoretical alpha width was identified. The experimental data suggest an alpha width lower by at least a factor of 0.125 in the astrophysical energy range. An upper limit for the 128Ba(g,a)124Xe stellar rate was inferred from our measurement. The impact of this rate was studied in two different models for core-collapse supernova explosions of 25 solar mass stars. A significant contribution to the 124Xe abundance via this reaction path would only be possible when the rate was increased above the previous standard value. Since the experimental data rule this out, they also demonstrate the closure of this production path.
  • The goal of nuclear astrophysics is to measure cross sections of nuclear physics reactions of interest in astrophysics. At stars temperatures, these cross sections are very low due to the suppression of the Coulomb barrier. Cosmic ray induced background can seriously limit the determination of reaction cross sections at energies relevant to astrophysical processes and experimental setups should be arranged in order to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Placing experiments in underground sites, however, reduces this background opening the way towards ultra low cross section determination. LUNA (Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics) was pioneer in this sense. Two accelerators were mounted at the INFN National Laboratories of Gran Sasso (LNGS) allowing to study nuclear reactions close to stellar energies. A summary of the relevant technology used, including accelerators, target production and characterisation, and background treatment is given.
  • The $^{22}$Ne(p,$\gamma$)$^{23}$Na reaction takes part in the neon-sodium cycle of hydrogen burning. This cycle affects the synthesis of the elements between $^{20}$Ne and $^{27}$Al in asymptotic giant branch stars and novae. The $^{22}$Ne(p,$\gamma$)$^{23}$Na reaction rate is very uncertain because of a large number of unobserved resonances lying in the Gamow window. At proton energies below 400\,keV, only upper limits exist in the literature for the resonance strengths. Previous reaction rate evaluations differ by large factors. In the present work, the first direct observations of the $^{22}$Ne(p,$\gamma$)$^{23}$Na resonances at 156.2, 189.5, and 259.7\,keV are reported. Their resonance strengths have been derived with 2-7\% uncertainty. In addition, upper limits for three other resonances have been greatly reduced. Data were taken using a windowless $^{22}$Ne gas target and high-purity germanium detectors at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics in the Gran Sasso laboratory of the National Institute for Nuclear Physics, Italy, taking advantage of the ultra-low background observed deep underground. The new reaction rate is a factor of 5 higher than the recent evaluation at temperatures relevant to novae and asymptotic giant branch stars nucleosynthesis.
  • The stable nucleus $^{15}$N is the mirror of $^{15}$O, the bottleneck in the hydrogen burning CNO cycle. Most of the $^{15}$N level widths below the proton emission threshold are known from just one nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurement, with limited precision in some cases. A recent experiment with the AGATA demonstrator array determined level lifetimes using the Doppler Shift Attenuation Method (DSAM) in $^{15}$O. As a reference and for testing the method, level lifetimes in $^{15}$N have also been determined in the same experiment. The latest compilation of $^{15}$N level properties dates back to 1991. The limited precision in some cases in the compilation calls for a new measurement in order to enable a comparison to the AGATA demonstrator data. The widths of several $^{15}$N levels have been studied with the NRF method. The solid nitrogen compounds enriched in $^{15}$N have been irradiated with bremsstrahlung. The $\gamma$-rays following the deexcitation of the excited nuclear levels were detected with four HPGe detectors. Integrated photon-scattering cross sections of ten levels below the proton emission threshold have been measured. Partial gamma-ray widths of ground-state transitions were deduced and compared to the literature. The photon scattering cross sections of two levels above the proton emission threshold, but still below other particle emission energies have also been measured, and proton resonance strengths and proton widths were deduced. Gamma and proton widths consistent with the literature values were obtained, but with greatly improved precision.
  • The total cross sections for the $^{152}$Gd(p,$\gamma$)$^{153}$Tb and $^{152}$Gd(p,n)$^{152}$Tb reactions have been measured by the activation method at effective center-of-mass energies \mbox{$3.47 \leq E_\mathrm{c.m.}^\mathrm{eff}\leq 7.94$ MeV} and \mbox{$4.96 \leq E_\mathrm{c.m.}^\mathrm{eff} \leq 7.94$ MeV}, respectively. The targets were prepared by evaporation of 30.6\% isotopically enriched $^{152}$Gd oxide on aluminum backing foils, and bombarded with proton beams provided by a cyclotron accelerator. The cross sections were deduced from the observed $\gamma$-ray activity, which was detected off-line by a HPGe detector in a low background environment. The results are presented and compared with predictions of statistical model calculations. This comparison supports a modified optical proton+$^{152}$Gd potential suggested earlier.
  • Alpha elastic scattering angular distributions of the 106Cd(alpha,alpha)106Cd reaction were measured at three energies around the Coulomb barrier to provide a sensitive test for the alpha + nucleus optical potential parameter sets. Furthermore, the new high precision angular distributions, together with the data available from the literature were used to study the energy dependence of the locally optimized {\alpha}+nucleus optical potential in a wide energy region ranging from E_Lab = 27.0 MeV down to 16.1 MeV. The potentials under study are a basic prerequisite for the prediction of alpha-induced reaction cross sections and thus, for the calculation of stellar reaction rates used for the astrophysical gamma process. Therefore, statistical model predictions using as input the optical potentials discussed in the present work are compared to the available 106Cd + alpha cross section data.
  • The one neutron knock-out reaction $^1$H($^{20}$C,$^{19}$C$\gamma$) was studied at RIKEN using the DALI2 array. A $\gamma$ ray transition was observed at 198(10) keV. Based on the comparison between the experimental production cross section and theoretical predictions, the transition was assigned to the decay of the 3/2$_1^+$ state to the ground state.
  • Astrophysical reaction rates, which are mostly derived from theoretical cross sections, are necessary input to nuclear reaction network simulations for studying the origin of $p$ nuclei. Past experiments have found a considerable difference between theoretical and experimental cross sections in some cases, especially for ($\alpha$,$\gamma$) reactions at low energy. Therefore, it is important to experimentally test theoretical cross section predictions at low, astrophysically relevant energies. The aim is to measure reaction cross sections of $^{107}$Ag($\alpha$,$\gamma$)$^{111}$In and $^{107}$Ag($\alpha$,n)$^{110}$In at low energies in order to extend the experimental database for astrophysical reactions involving $\alpha$ particles towards lower mass numbers. Reaction rate predictions are very sensitive to the optical model parameters and this introduces a large uncertainty into theoretical rates involving $\alpha$ particles at low energy. We have also used Hauser-Feshbach statistical model calculations to study the origin of possible discrepancies between prediction and data. An activation technique has been used to measure the reaction cross sections at effective center of mass energies between 7.79 MeV and 12.50 MeV. Isomeric and ground state cross sections of the ($\alpha$,n) reaction were determined separately. The measured cross sections were found to be lower than theoretical predictions for the ($\alpha$,$\gamma$) reaction. Varying the calculated averaged widths in the Hauser-Feshbach model, it became evident that the data for the ($\alpha$,$\gamma$) and ($\alpha$,n) reactions can only be simultaneously reproduced when rescaling the ratio of $\gamma$- to neutron width and using an energy-dependent imaginary part in the optical $\alpha$+$^{107}$Ag potential.......
  • The KADoNiS-$p$ project is an online database for cross sections relevant to the $p$-process. All existing experimental data was collected and reviewed. With this contribution a user-friendly database using the KADoNiS (Karlsruhe Astrophysical Database of Nucleosynthesis in Stars) framework is launched, including all available experimental data from (p,$\gamma$), (p,n), (p,$\alpha$), ($\alpha$,$\gamma$), ($\alpha$,n) and ($\alpha$,p) reactions in or close to the respective Gamow window with cut-off date of August 2012 (www.kadonis.org/pprocess).
  • The structure of the $^{24}$F nucleus has been studied at GANIL using the $\beta$ decay of $^{24}$O and the in-beam $\gamma$-ray spectroscopy from the fragmentation of projectile nuclei. Combining these complementary experimental techniques, the level scheme of $^{24}$F has been constructed up to 3.6 Mev by means of particle-$\gamma$ and particle-$\gamma\gamma$ coincidence relations. Experimental results are compared to shell-model calculations using the standard USDA and USDB interactions as well as ab-initio valence-space Hamiltonians calculated from the in-medium similarity renormalization group based on chiral two- and three-nucleon forces. Both methods reproduce the measured level spacings well, and this close agreement allows unidentified spins and parities to be consistently assigned.
  • The $^{22}$Ne(p,$\gamma$)$^{23}$Na reaction takes part in the neon-sodium cycle of hydrogen burning. This cycle is active in asymptotic giant branch stars as well as in novae and contributes to the nucleosythesis of neon and sodium isotopes. In order to reduce the uncertainties in the predicted nucleosynthesis yields, new experimental efforts to measure the $^{22}$Ne(p,$\gamma$)$^{23}$Na cross section directly at the astrophysically relevant energies are needed. In the present work, a feasibility study for a $^{22}$Ne(p,$\gamma$)$^{23}$Na experiment at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA) 400\,kV accelerator deep underground in the Gran Sasso laboratory, Italy, is reported. The ion beam induced $\gamma$-ray background has been studied. The feasibility study led to the first observation of the $E_{\rm p}$ = 186\,keV resonance in a direct experiment. An experimental lower limit of 0.12\,$\times$\,10$^{-6}$\,eV has been obtained for the resonance strength. Informed by the feasibility study, a dedicated experimental setup for the $^{22}$Ne(p,$\gamma$)$^{23}$Na experiment has been developed. The new setup has been characterized by a study of the temperature and pressure profiles. The beam heating effect that reduces the effective neon gas density due to the heating by the incident proton beam has been studied using the resonance scan technique, and the size of this effect has been determined for a neon gas target.
  • In the model calculations of heavy element nucleosynthesis processes the nuclear reaction rates are taken from statistical model calculations which utilize various nuclear input parameters. It is found that in the case of reactions involving alpha particles the calculations bear a high uncertainty owing to the largely unknown low energy alpha-nucleus optical potential. Experiments are typically restricted to higher energies and therefore no direct astrophysical consequences can be drawn. In the present work a (p,alpha) reaction is used for the first time to study the alpha-nucleus optical potential. The measured 64Zn(p,alpha)61Cu cross section is uniquely sensitive to the alpha-nucleus potential and the measurement covers the whole astrophysically relevant energy range. By the comparison to model calculations, direct evidence is provided for the incorrectness of global optical potentials used in astrophysical models.
  • The cross sections of the 162Er(a,g,)166Yb and 162Er(a,n)165Yb reactions have been measured for the first time. The radiative alpha capture reaction cross section was measured from Ec.m. = 16.09 down to Ec.m. = 11.21 MeV, close to the astrophysically relevant region (which lies between 7.8 and 11.48 MeV at 3 GK stellar temperature). The 162Er(a,n)165Yb reaction was studied above the reaction threshold between Ec.m. = 12.19 and 16.09 MeV. The fact that the 162Er(a,g)166Yb cross sections were measured below the (a,n) threshold at first time in this mass region opens the opportunity to study directly the a-widths required for the determination of astrophysical reaction rates. The data clearly show that compound nucleus formation in this reaction proceeds differently than previously predicted.
  • For the better understanding of the astrophysical gamma-process the experimental determination of low energy proton- and alpha-capture cross sections on heavy isotopes is required. The existing data for the 92Mo(p,gamma)93Tc reaction are contradictory and strong fluctuation of the cross section is observed which cannot be explained by the statistical model. In this paper a new determination of the 92Mo(p,gamma)93Tc and 98Mo(p,gamma)99mTc cross sections based on thick target yield measurements are presented and the results are compared with existing data and model calculations. Reaction rates of 92Mo(p,gamma)93Tc at temperatures relevant for the gamma-process are derived directly from the measured thick target yields. The obtained rates are a factor of 2 lower than the ones used in astrophysical network calculations. It is argued that in the case of fluctuating cross sections the thick target yield measurement can be more suited for a reliable reaction rate determination.
  • The elastic scattering cross sections for the reactions $^{110,116}$Cd($\alpha,\alpha$)$^{110,116}$Cd at energies above and below the Coulomb barrier are presented to provide a sensitive test for the alpha-nucleus optical potential parameter sets. Additional constraints for the optical potential are taken from the analysis of elastic scattering excitation functions at backward angles which are available in literature. Moreover, the variation of the elastic alpha scattering cross sections along the $Z = 48$ isotopic and $N = 62$ isotonic chain is investigated by the study of the ratios of the of $^{106,110,116}$Cd($\alpha,\alpha$)$^{106,110,116}$Cd scattering cross sections at E$_{c.m.} \approx$ 15.6 and 18.8 MeV and the ratio of the $^{110}$Cd($\alpha,\alpha$)$^{110}$Cd and $^{112}$Sn($\alpha,\alpha$)$^{112}$Sn reaction cross sections at E$_{c.m.} \approx$ 18.8 MeV, respectively. These ratios are sensitive probes for the alpha-nucleus optical potential parameterizations. The potentials under study are a basic prerequisite for the prediction of $\alpha$-induced reaction cross sections, e.g.\ for the calculation of stellar reaction rates in the astrophysical $p$- or $\gamma$-process.