• Weakly interacting massive particles are a widely well-probed dark matter candidate by the dark matter direct detection experiments. Theoretically, there are a large number of ultraviolet completed models that consist of a weakly interacting massive particle dark matter. The variety of models make the comparison with the direct detection data complicated and often non-trivial. To overcome this, in the non-relativistic limit, the effective theory was developed in the literature which works very well to significantly reduce the complexity of dark matter-nucleon interactions and to better study the nuclear response functions. In the effective theory framework for a spin-1/2 dark matter, we combine three independent likelihood functions from the latest PandaX, LUX, and XENON1T data, and give a joint limit on each effective coupling. The astrophysical uncertainties of the dark matter distribution are also included in the likelihood. We further discuss the isospin violating cases of the interactions. Finally, for both dimension-five and dimension-six effective theories above the electroweak scale, we give updated limits of the new physics mass scales.
  • Tentative evidence for excess GeV-scale gamma rays from the galactic center has been corroborated by several groups, including the Fermi collaboration, on whose data the observation is based. Dark matter annihilation into standard model particles has been shown to give a good fit to the signal for a variety of final state particles, but generic models are inconsistent with constraints from direct detection. Models where the dark matter annihilates to mediators that subsequently decay are less constrained. We perform global fits of such models to recent data, allowing branching fractions to all possible fermionic final states to vary. The best fit models, including constraints from the AMS-02 experiment (and also antiproton ratio), require branching primarily to muons, with a $\sim 10-20\%$ admixture of $b$ quarks, and no other species. This suggests models in which there are two scalar mediators that mix with the Higgs, and have masses consistent with such a decay pattern. The scalar that decays to $\mu^+\mu^-$ must therefore be lighter than $2m_\tau \cong 3.6$ GeV. Such a small mass can cause Sommerfeld enhancement, which is useful to explain why the best-fit annihilation cross section is larger than the value needed for a thermal relic density. For light mediator masses $\sim (0.2-2)$ GeV, it can also naturally lead to elastic DM self-interactions at the right level for addressing discrepancies in small structure formation as predicted by collisionless cold dark matter.
  • More than one Higgs boson may be present near the currently discovered Higgs mass, which can not be properly resolved due to the limitations in the intrinsic energy resolution at the Large Hadron Collider. We investigated the scenarios where two $CP$-even Higgs bosons are degenerate in mass. To correctly predict the Higgs signatures, quantum interference effects between the two Higgs bosons must be taken into account, which, however, has been often neglected in the literature. We carried out a global analysis including the interference effects for a variety of Higgs searching channels at the Large Hadron Collider, which suggests that the existence of two degenerate Higgs bosons near 125 GeV is highly likely. Prospects of distinguishing the degenerate Higgs case from the single Higgs case are discussed.
  • Jinping Neutrino Experiment (Jinping) is proposed to significantly improve measurements on solar neutrinos and geoneutrinos in China Jinping Laboratory - a lab with a number of unparalleled features, thickest overburden, lowest reactor neutrino background, etc., which identify it as the world-best low-energy neutrino laboratory. The proposed experiment will have target mass of 4 kilotons of liquid scintillator or water-based liquid scintillator, with a fiducial mass of 2 kilotons for neutrino-electron scattering events and 3 kilotons for inverse-beta interaction events. A number of initial sensitivities studies have been carried out, including on the transition phase for the solar neutrinos oscillation from the vacuum to the matter effect, the discovery of solar neutrinos from the carbon-nitrogen-oxygen (CNO) cycle, the resolution of the high and low metallicity hypotheses, and the unambiguous separation on U and Th cascade decays from the dominant crustal anti-electron neutrinos in China.
  • We discuss the diboson excess seen by the ATLAS detector around 2 TeV in the LHC run I at $\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV. We explore the possibility that such an excess can arise from a $Z'$ boson which acquires mass through a $U(1)_X$ Stueckelberg extension. The corresponding $Z'$ gauge boson is leptophobic with a mass of around 2 TeV and has interactions with $SU(2)_L$ Yang-Mills fields and gauge fields of the hypercharge. The analysis predicts $Z'$ decays into $WW$ and $ZZ$ as well as into $Z\gamma$. Further three-body as well as four-body decays of the $Z'$ such as $WWZ, WW\gamma, WWZZ$ etc are predicted. In the analysis we use the helicity formalism which allows us to exhibit the helicity structure of the $Z'$ decay processes in an transparent manner. In particular, we are able to show the set of vanishing helicity amplitudes in the decay of the massive $Z'$ into two vector bosons due to angular momentum conservation with a special choice of the reference momenta. The residual set of non-vanishing helicity amplitudes are identified. The parameter space of the model compatible with the diboson excess seen by the ATLAS experiment at $\sqrt s=8$ TeV is exhibited. Estimate of the diboson excess expected at $\sqrt s= 13$ TeV with 20 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity at LHC run II is also given. It is shown that the $WW$, $ZZ$ and $Z\gamma$ modes are predicted to be in the approximate ratio $1:\cos^2\theta_W (1+ \alpha \tan^2\theta_W)^2/2: (1-\alpha)^2\sin^2\theta_W/2$ where $\alpha$ is the relative strength of the couplings of hypercharge gauge fields to the couplings of the Yang-Mills gauge fields. Thus observation of the $Z\gamma$ mode as well as three-body and four-body decay modes of the $Z'$ will provide a definite test of the model and of a possible new source of interaction beyond the standard model.
  • Motivated by excess diphoton events reported by ATLAS and CMS, we show that composite pseudoscalars, bound states of heavy fermions under a new confining gauge theory, can be pair-produced by Drell-Yan production if the constituent particles are electrically charged. The decays of these pion-like bound states into two photons can explain the observed events near 750 GeV. The model predicts that there should be significant numbers of 4-photon events from decays of the pseudoscalar pairs, as well as same-sign dilepton pairs at a somewhat lower invariant mass, or multijet signals, coming from decays of charge-2 pseudoscalars. These states and their decays are necessary for avoiding stable charged baryon-like relics in the new confining sector. A neutral baryon-like dark matter candidate of mass $\sim N_c\times 375$ GeV is a further prediction of the model, for SU($N_c$) confining gauge group.
  • One of the simplest hidden sectors with signatures in the visible sector is fermionic dark matter $\chi$ coupled to a $Z'$ gauge boson that has purely kinetic mixing with the standard model hypercharge. We consider the combined constraints from relic density, direct detection and collider experiments on such models in which the dark matter is either a Dirac or a Majorana fermion. We point out sensitivity to details of the UV completion for the Majorana model. For kinetic mixing parameter $\epsilon \le 0.01$, only relic density and direct detection are relevant, while for larger $\epsilon$, electroweak precision, LHC dilepton, and missing energy constraints become important. We identify regions of the parameter space of $m_\chi$, $m_{Z'}$, dark gauge coupling and $\epsilon$ that are most promising for discovery through these experimental probes. We study the compatibility of the models with the galactic center gamma ray excess, finding agreement at the 2-3$\sigma$ level for the Dirac model.
  • The LHC searches for the CP-odd Higgs boson is studied (with masses from 300 GeV to 1 TeV) in the context of the general two-Higgs-doublet model. With the discovery of the 125 GeV Higgs boson at the LHC, we highlight one promising discovery channel of the hZ. This channel can become significant after the global signal fitting to the 125 GeV Higgs boson in the general two-Higgs-doublet model. It is particularly important in the scenario where two CP-even Higgs bosons in the two-Higgs-doublet model have the common mass of 125 GeV. Since the final states involve a Standard-Model-like Higgs boson, we apply the jet substructure analysis of the fat Higgs jet in order to eliminate the Standard Model background sufficiently. After performing the kinematic cuts, we present the LHC search sensitivities for the CP-odd Higgs boson with mass up to 1 TeV via this channel.
  • The recently discovered 3.5 keV X-ray line from extragalactic sources may be evidence of dark matter scatterings or decays. We show that dark atoms can be the source of the emission, through their hyperfine transitions, which would be the analog of 21 cm radiation from a dark sector. We identify two families of dark atom models that match the X-ray observations and are consistent with other constraints. In the first, the hyperfine excited state is long-lived compared to the age of the universe, and the dark atom mass is relatively unconstrained; dark atoms could be strongly self-interacting in this case. In the second, the excited state is short-lived and viable models are parameterized by the value of the dark proton-to-electron mass ratio $R$: for $R = 10^2-10^4$, the dark atom mass is predicted be in the range $350-1300$ GeV, with fine structure constant $\alpha'\cong 0.1-0.6$. In either class of models, the dark photon must be massive with $m_{\gamma'} \gtrsim$ 1 MeV and decay into $e^+ e^-$. Evidence for the model could come from direct detection of the dark atoms. In a natural extension of this framework, the dark photon could decay predominantly into invisible particles, for example $\sim 0.5$ eV sterile neutrinos, explaining the extra radiation degree of freedom recently suggested by data from BICEP2, while remaining compatible with BBN.
  • An emission line with energy of $E\sim 3.5$ keV has been observed in galaxy clusters by two experiments. The emission line is consistent with the decay of a dark matter particle with a mass of $\sim 7$ keV. In this work we discuss the possibility that the dark particle responsible for the emission is a real scalar ($\rho$) which arises naturally in a $U(1)_X$ Stueckelberg of MSSM. In the MSSM Stueckelberg extension $\rho$ couples only to other scalars carrying a $U(1)_X$ quantum number. Under the assumption that there exists a vectorlike leptonic generation carrying both $SU(2)_L\times U(1)_Y$ and $U(1)_X$ quantum numbers, we compute the decay of the $\rho$ into two photons via a triangle loop involving scalars. The relic density of the $\rho$ arises via the decay $H^0\to h^0+ \rho$ at the loop level involving scalars, and via the annihilation processes of the vectorlike scalars into $\rho + h^0$. It is shown that the galactic data can be explained within a multicomponent dark matter model where the 7 keV dark matter is a subdominant component constituting only $(1-10)$\% of the matter relic density with the rest being supersymmetric dark matter such as the neutralino. Thus the direct detection experiments remain viable searches for WIMPs. The fact that the dark scalar $\rho$ with no interactions with the standard model particles arises from a Stueckelberg extension of a hidden $U(1)_X$ implies that the 3.5 KeV galactic line emission is a signal from the hidden sector.
  • It has been suggested that cold dark matter (CDM) has difficulties in explaining tentative evidence for noncuspy halo profiles in small galaxies, and the low velocity dispersions observed in the largest Milky Way satellites ("too big to fail" problem). Strongly self-interacting dark matter has been noted as a robust solution to these problems. The elastic cross sections required are much larger than predicted by generic CDM models, but could naturally be of the right size if dark matter is composite. We explore in a general way the constraints on models where strongly interacting CDM is in the form of dark "atoms" or "molecules," or bound states of a confining gauge interaction ("hadrons"). These constraints include considerations of relic density, direct detection, big bang nucleosynthesis, the cosmic microwave background, and LHC data.
  • There has been renewed interest in the possibility that dark matter exists in the form of atoms, analogous to those of the visible world. An important input for understanding the cosmological consequences of dark atoms is their self-scattering. Making use of results from atomic physics for the potentials between hydrogen atoms, we compute the low-energy elastic scattering cross sections for dark atoms. We find an intricate dependence upon the ratio of the dark proton to electron mass, allowing for the possibility to "design" low-energy features in the cross section. Dependences upon other parameters, namely the gauge coupling and reduced mass, scale out of the problem by using atomic units. We derive constraints on the parameter space of dark atoms by demanding that their scattering cross section does not exceed bounds from dark matter halo shapes. We discuss the formation of molecular dark hydrogen in the universe, and determine the analogous constraints on the model when the dark matter is predominantly in molecular form.
  • Dark matter annihilation into photons in our galaxy would constitute an exciting indirect signal of its existence, as underscored by tentative evidence for 130 GeV dark matter in Fermi/LAT data. Models that give a large annihilation cross section into photons typically require the dark matter to couple to, or be composed of, new charged particles, that can be produced in colliders. We consider the LHC constraints on some representative models of these types, including the signals of same-sign dileptons, opposite-sign dileptons, events mimicking the production and decay of excited leptons, four-photon events, resonant production of composite vectors decaying into two photons, and monophoton events.
  • Inspired by a recently proposed model of millicharged atomic dark matter (MADM), we analyze several classes of light dark matter models with respect to CoGeNT modulated and unmodulated data, and constraints from CDMS, XENON10 and XENON100. After removing the surface contaminated events from the original CoGeNT data set, we find an acceptable fit to all these data (but with the modulating part of the signal making a statistically small contribution), using somewhat relaxed assumptions about the response of the null experiments at low recoil energies, and postulating an unknown modulating background in the CoGeNT data at recoil energies above 1.5 keVee. We compare the fits of MADM---an example of inelastic magnetic dark matter---to those of standard elastically and inelastically scattering light WIMPs (eDM and iDM). The iDM model gives the best fit, with MADM close behind. The dark matter interpretation of the DAMA annual modulation cannot be made compatible with these results however. We find that the inclusion of a tidal debris component in the dark matter phase space distribution improves the fits or helps to relieve tension with XENON constraints.
  • We present a simplified version of the atomic dark matter scenario, in which charged dark constituents are bound into atoms analogous to hydrogen by a massless hidden sector U(1) gauge interaction. Previous studies have assumed that interactions between the dark sector and the standard model are mediated by a second, massive Z' gauge boson, but here we consider the case where only a massless gamma' kinetically mixes with the standard model hypercharge and thereby mediates direct detection. This is therefore the simplest atomic dark matter model that has direct interactions with the standard model, arising from the small electric charge for the dark constituents induced by the kinetic mixing. We map out the parameter space that is consistent with cosmological constraints and direct searches, assuming that some unspecified mechanism creates the asymmetry that gives the right abundance, since the dark matter cannot be a thermal relic in this scenario. In the special case where the dark "electron" and "proton" are degenerate in mass, inelastic hyperfine transitions can explain the CoGeNT excess events. In the more general case, elastic transitions dominate, and can be close to current direct detection limits over a wide range of masses.
  • We overview the constraints on the 4th-generation neutrino dark matter candidate and investigate a possible way to make it a viable dark matter candidate. Given the LEP constraints tell us that the 4th-generation neutrino has to be rather heavy (> M_Z/2), in sharp contrast to the other three neutrinos, the underlying nature of the 4th-generation neutrino is expected to be different. We suggest that an additional gauge symmetry B-4L_4 distinguishes it from the Standard Model's three lighter neutrinos and this also facilitates promotion of the 4th-generation predominantly right-handed neutrino to a good cold dark matter candidate. It provides distinguishable predictions for the dark matter direct detection and the Large Hadron Collider experiments.
  • We discuss the recent excess seen by the CDF Collaboration in the dijet invariant mass distribution produced in association with a $W$ boson. We analyze the possibility of such a signal within the context of a $U(1)_X$ Stueckelberg extension of the Standard Model where the new gauge boson couples only to quarks. In addition to the analysis of the $Wjj$ anomaly we also discuss the production of $Zjj$ and $\gamma jj$ at the Tevatron. The analysis is then extended to the Large Hadron Collider with $\sqrt{s}=7 {\rm TeV}$ and predictions for the dijet signals are made.
  • Constraints on dark matter from the first CMS and ATLAS SUSY searches are investigated. It is shown that within the minimal supergravity model, the early search for supersymmetry at the LHC has depleted a large portion of the signature space in dark matter direct detection experiments. In particular, the prospects for detecting signals of dark matter in the XENON and CDMS experiments are significantly affected in the low neutralino mass region. Here the relic density of dark matter typically arises from slepton coannihilations in the early universe. In contrast, it is found that the CMS and ATLAS analyses leave untouched the Higgs pole and the Hyperbolic Branch/Focus Point regions, which are now being probed by the most recent XENON results. Analysis is also done for supergravity models with non-universal soft breaking where one finds that a part of the dark matter signature space depleted by the CMS and ATLAS cuts in the minimal SUGRA case is repopulated. Thus, observation of dark matter in the LHC depleted region of minimal supergravity may indicate non-universalities in soft breaking.
  • The CMS and the ATLAS Collaborations have recently reported on the search for supersymmetry with 35 pb$^{-1}$ of data and have put independent limits on the parameter space of the supergravity unified model with universal boundary conditions at the GUT scale for soft breaking, i.e., the mSUGRA model. We extend this study by examining other regions of the mSUGRA parameter space in $A_0$ and $\tan\beta$. Further, we contrast the reach of CMS and ATLAS with 35 pb$^{-1}$ of data with the indirect constraints, i.e., the constraints from the Higgs boson mass limits, from flavor physics and from the dark matter limits from WMAP. Specifically it is found that a significant part of the parameter space excluded by CMS and ATLAS is essentially already excluded by the indirect constraints and the fertile region of parameter space has yet to be explored. We also emphasize that gluino masses as low as 400 GeV but for squark masses much larger than the gluino mass remain unconstrained and further that much of the hyperbolic branch of radiative electroweak symmetry breaking, with low values of the Higgs mixing parameter $\mu$, is essentially untouched by the recent LHC analysis.
  • We analyze supergravity models that predict a low mass gluino within the landscape of sparticle mass hierarchies. The analysis includes a broad class of models that arise in minimal and in non-minimal supergravity unified frameworks and in extended models with additional $U(1)^n_X$ hidden sector gauge symmetries. Gluino masses in the range $(350-700)$ GeV are investigated. Masses in this range are promising for early discovery at the LHC at $\sqrt s =7$ TeV (LHC-7). The models exhibit a wide dispersion in the gaugino-Higgsino eigencontent of their LSPs and in their associated sparticle mass spectra. A signature analysis is carried out and the prominent discovery channels for the models are identified with most models needing only $\sim 1 \rm fb^{-1}$ for discovery at LHC-7. In addition, significant variations in the discovery capability of the low mass gluino models are observed for models in which the gluino masses are of comparable size due to the mass splittings in different models and the relative position of the light gluino within the various sparticle mass hierarchies. The models are consistent with the current stringent bounds from the Fermi-LAT, CDMS-II, XENON100, and EDELWEISS-2 experiments. A subclass of these models, which include a mixed-wino LSP and a Higgsino LSP, are also shown to accommodate the positron excess seen in the PAMELA satellite experiment.
  • A solution to the PAMELA positron excess with Higgsino dark matter within extended supergravity grand unified (SUGRA) models is proposed. The models are compliant with the photon constraints recently set by Fermi-LAT and produce positron as well as antiproton fluxes consistent with the PAMELA experiment. The SUGRA models considered have an extended hidden sector with extra degrees of freedom which allow for a satisfaction of relic density consistent with WMAP. The Higgsino models are also consistent with the CDMS-II and XENON100 data and are discoverable at LHC-7 with 1 fb^(-1) of luminosity. The models are testable on several fronts.
  • Most analyses of dark matter within supersymmetry assume the entire cold dark matter arising only from weakly interacting neutralinos. We study a new class of models consisting of $U(1)^n$ hidden sector extensions of the MSSM that includes several stable particles, both fermionic and bosonic, which can be interpreted as constituents of dark matter. In one such class of models, dark matter is made up of both a Majorana dark matter particle, i.e., a neutralino, and a Dirac fermion with the current relic density of dark matter as given by WMAP being composed of the relic density of the two species. These models can explain the PAMELA positron data and are consistent with the anti-proton flux data, as well as the photon data from FERMI-LAT. Further, it is shown that such models can also simultaneously produce spin independent cross sections which can be probed in CDMS-II, XENON-100 and other ongoing dark matter experiments. The implications of the models at the LHC and at the NLC are also briefly discussed.
  • The region of low neutralino masses as low as (5-10) GeV has attracted attention recently due to the possibility of excess events above background in dark matter detectors. An analysis of spin independent neutralino-proton cross sections $\SI$ which includes this low mass region is given. The analysis is done in MSSM with radiative electroweak symmetry breaking (REWSB). It is found that cross sections as large as $10^{-40}$ cm$^2$ can be accommodated in MSSM within the REWSB framework. However, inclusion of sparticle mass limits from current experiments, as well as lower limits on the Higgs searches from the Tevatron, and the current experimental upper limit on $B_s\to \mu^+\mu^-$ significantly limit the allowed parameter space reducing $\SI$ to lie below $\sim 10^{-41}$cm$^2$ or even lower for neutralino masses around 10 GeV. These cross sections are an order of magnitude lower than the cross sections needed to explain the reported data in the recent dark matter experiments in the low neutralino mass region.
  • An analysis is given connecting event rates for the direct detection of neutralino dark matter with the possible signatures of supersymmetry at the LHC. It is shown that if an effect is seen in the direct detection experiments at a level of $O(10^{-44})$ cm$^2$ for the neutralino-proton cross section, then within the mSUGRA model the next heavier particle above the neutralino is either a stau, a chargino, or a CP odd/CP even (A/H) Higgs boson. Further, the collider analysis shows that models with a neutralino-proton cross section at the level of $(1-5)\times 10^{-44}$ cm$^2$ could be probed with as little as 1 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity at the LHC at $\sqrt s=10$ TeV. The most recent limit from the five tower CDMS II result on WIMP-nucleon cross section is discussed in this context. It is argued that the conclusions of the analysis given here are more broadly applicable with inclusion of non-universalities in the SUGRA models.
  • Recent re-evaluations of the Standard Model (SM) contribution to ${\mathcal Br(b\to s\gamma)$ hint at a positive correction from new physics. Since a charged Higgs boson exchange always gives a positive contribution to this branching ratio, the constraint points to the possibility of a relatively light charged Higgs. It is found that under the HFAG constraints and with re-evaluated SM results large cancellations between the charged Higgs and the chargino contributions in supersymmetric models occur. Such cancellations then correlate the charged Higgs and the chargino masses often implying both are light. Inclusion of the more recent evaluation of $g_{\mu}-2$ is also considered. The combined constraints imply the existence of several light sparticles. Signatures arising from these light sparticles are investigated and the analysis indicates the possibility of their early discovery at the LHC in a significant part of the parameter space. We also show that for certain restricted regions of the parameter space, such as for very large $\tan\beta$ under the $1\sigma$ HFAG constraints, the signatures from Higgs production supersede those from sparticle production and may become the primary signatures for the discovery of supersymmetry.