• Magnetism induced by external pressure ($p$) was studied in a FeSe crystal sample by means of muon-spin rotation. The magnetic transition changes from second-order to first-order for pressures exceeding the critical value $p_{{\rm c}}\simeq2.4-2.5$ GPa. The magnetic ordering temperature ($T_{{\rm N}}$) and the value of the magnetic moment per Fe site ($m_{{\rm Fe}}$) increase continuously with increasing pressure, reaching $T_{{\rm N}}\simeq50$~K and $m_{{\rm Fe}}\simeq0.25$ $\mu_{{\rm B}}$ at $p\simeq2.6$ GPa, respectively. No pronounced features at both $T_{{\rm N}}(p)$ and $m_{{\rm Fe}}(p)$ are detected at $p\simeq p_{{\rm c}}$, thus suggesting that the stripe-type magnetic order in FeSe remains unchanged above and below the critical pressure $p_{{\rm c}}$. A phenomenological model for the $(p,T)$ phase diagram of FeSe reveals that these observations are consistent with a scenario where the nematic transitions of FeSe at low and high pressures are driven by different mechanisms.
  • Muon spin rotation and relaxation studies have been performed on a "111" family of iron-based superconductors NaFe_1-xNi_xAs. Static magnetic order was characterized by obtaining the temperature and doping dependences of the local ordered magnetic moment size and the volume fraction of the magnetically ordered regions. For x = 0 and 0.4 %, a transition to a nearly-homogeneous long range magnetically ordered state is observed, while for higher x than 0.4 % magnetic order becomes more disordered and is completely suppressed for x = 1.5 %. The magnetic volume fraction continuously decreases with increasing x. The combination of magnetic and superconducting volumes implies that a spatially-overlapping coexistence of magnetism and superconductivity spans a large region of the T-x phase diagram for NaFe_1-xNi_xAs . A strong reduction of both the ordered moment size and the volume fraction is observed below the superconducting T_C for x = 0.6, 1.0, and 1.3 %, in contrast to other iron pnictides in which one of these two parameters exhibits a reduction below TC, but not both. The suppression of magnetic order is further enhanced with increased Ni doping, leading to a reentrant non-magnetic state below T_C for x = 1.3 %. The reentrant behavior indicates an interplay between antiferromagnetism and superconductivity involving competition for the same electrons. These observations are consistent with the sign-changing s-wave superconducting state, which is expected to appear on the verge of microscopic coexistence and phase separation with magnetism. We also present a universal linear relationship between the local ordered moment size and the antiferromagnetic ordering temperature TN across a variety of iron-based superconductors. We argue that this linear relationship is consistent with an itinerant-electron approach, in which Fermi surface nesting drives antiferromagnetic ordering.
  • Zero-field and transverse-field muon spin rotation/relaxation ($\mu$SR) experiments were undertaken in order to elucidate microscopic properties of a strongly-coupled superconductor Mo$_{8}$Ga$_{41}$ with $T_{\text{c}}=9.8$ K. The upper critical field extracted from the transverse-field $\mu$SR data exhibits significant reduction with respect to the data from thermodynamic measurements indicating the coexistence of two independent length scales in the superconducting state. Accordingly, the temperature-dependent magnetic penetration depth of Mo$_{8}$Ga$_{41}$ is described using the model, in which two s-wave superconducting gaps are assumed. The V for Mo substitution in the parent compound leads to the complete suppression of one superconducting gap, and Mo$_{7}$VGa$_{41}$ is well described within the single s-wave gap scenario. The reduction in the superfluid density and the evolution of the low-temperature resistivity upon the V substitution indicate the emergence of a competing state in Mo$_{7}$VGa$_{41}$ that may be responsible for the closure of one of the superconducting gaps.
  • We report temperature-dependent pair distribution function measurements of Sr$_{1-x}$Na$_{x}$Fe$_2$As$_2$, an iron-based superconductor system that contains a magnetic phase with reentrant tetragonal symmetry, known as the magnetic $C_4$ phase. Quantitative refinements indicate that the instantaneous local structure in the $C_4$ phase is comprised of fluctuating orthorhombic regions with a length scale of $\sim$2 nm, despite the tetragonal symmetry of the average static structure. Additionally, local orthorhombic fluctuations exist on a similar length scale at temperatures well into the paramagnetic tetragonal phase. These results highlight the exceptionally large nematic susceptibility of iron-based superconductors and have significant implications for the magnetic $C_4$ phase and the neighboring $C_2$ and superconducting phases.
  • The magnetic order induced by the pressure was studied in single crystalline FeSe by means of muon-spin rotation ($\mu$SR) technique. By following the evolution of the oscillatory part of the $\mu$SR signal as a function of angle between the initial muon-spin polarization and 101 axis of studied crystal it was found that the pressure induced magnetic order in FeSe corresponds either to the collinear (single-stripe) antiferromagnetic order as observed in parent compounds of various FeAs-based superconductors or to the Bi-Collinear order as obtained in FeTe system, but with the Fe spins turned by 45$^{\rm o}$. The value of the magnetic moment per Fe atom was estimated to be $\simeq 0.13-0.14$~$\mu_{\rm B}$ at $p\simeq 1.9$~GPa.
  • The temperature-pressure phase diagram of the ferromagnet LaCrGe$_3$ is determined for the first time from a combination of magnetization, muon-spin-rotation and electrical resistivity measurements. The ferromagnetic phase is suppressed near $2.1$~GPa, but quantum criticality is avoided by the appearance of a magnetic phase, likely modulated, AFM$_Q$. Our density functional theory total energy calculations suggest a near degeneracy of antiferromagnetic states with small magnetic wave vectors $Q$ allowing for the potential of an ordering wave vector evolving from $Q=0$ to finite $Q$, as expected from the most recent theories on ferromagnetic quantum criticality. Our findings show that LaCrGe$_3$ is a very simple example to study this scenario of avoided ferromagnetic quantum criticality and will inspire further study on this material and other itinerant ferromagnets.
  • Metal-to-insulator transitions (MITs) are a dramatic manifestation of strong electron correlations in solids1. The insulating phase can often be suppressed by quantum tuning, i.e. varying a nonthermal parameter such as chemical composi- tion or pressure, resulting in a zero-temperature quantum phase transition (QPT) to a metallic state driven by quantum fluctuations, in contrast to conventional phase transitions driven by thermal fluctuations. Theories of exotic phenomena known to occur near the Mott QPT such as quantum criticality and high-temperature superconductivity often assume a second-order QPT, but direct experimental evidence for either first- or second-order behavior at the magnetic QPT associated with the Mott transition has been scarce and further masked by the superconducting phase in unconventional superconductors. Most measurements of QPTs have been performed by volume-integrated probes, such as neutron scattering, magnetization, and transport, in which discontinuous behavior, phase separation, and spatially inhomogeneous responses are averaged and smeared out, leading at times to misidentification as continuous second-order transitions. Here, we demonstrate through muon spin relaxation/rotation (MuSR) experiments on two archetypal Mott insulating systems, composition-tuned RENiO3 (RE=rare earth element) and pressured-tuned V2O3, that the QPT from antiferromagnetic insulator to paramagnetic metal is first-order: the magnetically ordered volume fraction decreases to zero at the QPT, resulting in a broad region of intrinsic phase separation, while the ordered magnetic moment retains its full value across the phase diagram until it is suddenly destroyed at the QPT. These findings call for further investigation into the role of inelastic soft modes and the nature of dynamic spin and charge fluctuations underlying the transition.
  • The role played by the insulating intermediate (Li$_{0.84}$Fe$_{0.16}$)OH layer on magnetic and superconducting properties of (Li$_{0.84}$Fe$_{0.16}$)OHFe$_{0.98}$Se was studied by means of muon-spin rotation. It was found that it is not only enhances the coupling between the FeSe layers for temperatures below $\simeq 10$ K, but becomes superconducting by itself due to the proximity to the FeSe ones. Superconductivity in (Li$_{0.84}$Fe$_{0.16}$)OH layers is most probably filamentary-like and the energy gap value, depending on the order parameter symmetry, does not exceed 1-1.5 meV.
  • Identifying the superconducting (SC) gap structure of the iron-based high-temperature superconductors (Fe-HTS's) remains a key issue for the understanding of superconductivity in these materials. In contrast to other unconventional superconductors, in the Fe-HTS's both $d$-wave and extended s-wave pairing symmetries are close in energy, with the latter believed to be generally favored over the former. Probing the proximity between these very different SC states and identifying experimental parameters that can tune them, are of central interest. Here we report high-pressure muon spin rotation experiments on the temperature-dependent magnetic penetration depth (lambda) in the optimally doped Fe-HTS Ba_0.65Rb_0.35Fe_2As_2. At ambient pressure this material is known to be a nodeless s-wave superconductor. Upon pressure a strong decrease of (lambda) is observed, while the SC transition temperature remains nearly constant. More importantly, the low-temperature behavior of (1/lambda^{2}) changes from exponential saturation at zero pressure to a power-law with increasing pressure, providing unambiguous evidence that hydrostatic pressure promotes nodal SC gaps. Comparison to microscopic models favors a d-wave over a nodal s^{+-}-wave pairing as the origin of the nodes. Our results provide a new route of understanding the complex topology of the SC gap in Fe-HTS's.