• The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC) has a wide field-of-view (FOV, $\sim$2sr) and a high duty cycle ($\sim$95\%), which make it a powerful survey and monitoring experiment for sources of TeV gamma rays. We present a systematic survey of gamma-ray sources based on the Fermi 3FHL catalog. Sources are restricted to HAWC's FOV (Declination 19$^\circ$ $\pm$ 40$^\circ$) and to extragalactic sources with redshift: 0.001 $<$ z $<$ 0.3. Extragalactic gamma-ray sources are dominated by active galactic nuclei (AGN) and TeV gamma-ray sources are mostly BL Lac-type blazars. The study of AGNs through high energy gamma rays has opened a new window into the extreme processes of particle acceleration in the jets of these objects and provides a way to study the photon propagation and extra-galactic background light. We have improved the HAWC sensitivity at low energies (100 GeV to 1 TeV) based on the Crab pulsar, which is an excellent calibration source for TeV gamma rays. We will present the results of searching for and monitoring nearby AGNs with the improved analysis.
  • During the past two decades, experiments in both the northern and southern hemispheres have observed a small but measurable energy-dependent sidereal anisotropy in the arrival direction distribution of Galactic cosmic rays with relative intensities at the level of one per mille. Individually, these measurements are restricted by limited sky coverage, and so the power spectrum of the anisotropy obtained from any one measurement displays a systematic correlation between different multipole modes $C_\ell$. We present the results of a joint analysis of the anisotropy on all angular scales using cosmic-ray data collected during 336 days of operation of the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory (located at 19$^\circ$ N) and 5 years of data taking from the IceCube Neutrino Observatory (located at 90$^\circ$ S) The results include a combined sky map and an all-sky power spectrum in the overlapping energy range of the two experiments at around 10 TeV. We describe the methods used to combine the IceCube and HAWC data, address the individual detector systematics, and study the region of overlapping field of view between the two observatories.
  • During the past two decades, experiments in both the Northern and Southern hemispheres have observed a small but measurable energy-dependent sidereal anisotropy in the arrival direction distribution of galactic cosmic rays. The relative amplitude of the anisotropy is $10^{-4} - 10^{-3}$. However, each of these individual measurements is restricted by limited sky coverage, and so the pseudo-power spectrum of the anisotropy obtained from any one measurement displays a systematic correlation between different multipole modes $C_\ell$. To address this issue, we present the preliminary status of a joint analysis of the anisotropy on all angular scales using cosmic-ray data from the IceCube Neutrino Observatory located at the South Pole ($90^\circ$ S) and the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory located at Sierra Negra, Mexico ($19^\circ$ N). We describe the methods used to combine the IceCube and HAWC data, address the individual detector systematics and study the region of overlapping field of view between the two observatories.