• Because of the development of large-format, wide-field cameras, microlensing surveys are now able to monitor millions of stars with sufficient cadence to detect planets. These new discoveries will span the full range of significance levels including planetary signals too small to be distinguished from the noise. At present, we do not understand where the threshold is for detecting planets. MOA-2011-BLG-293Lb is the first planet to be published from the new surveys, and it also has substantial followup observations. This planet is robustly detected in survey+followup data (Delta chi^2 ~ 5400). The planet/host mass ratio is q=5.3+/- 0.2*10^{-3}. The best fit projected separation is s=0.548+/- 0.005 Einstein radii. However, due to the s-->s^{-1} degeneracy, projected separations of s^{-1} are only marginally disfavored at Delta chi^2=3. A Bayesian estimate of the host mass gives M_L = 0.43^{+0.27}_{-0.17} M_Sun, with a sharp upper limit of M_L < 1.2 M_Sun from upper limits on the lens flux. Hence, the planet mass is m_p=2.4^{+1.5}_{-0.9} M_Jup, and the physical projected separation is either r_perp = ~1.0 AU or r_perp = ~3.4 AU. We show that survey data alone predict this solution and are able to characterize the planet, but the Delta chi^2 is much smaller (Delta chi^2~500) than with the followup data. The Delta chi^2 for the survey data alone is smaller than for any other securely detected planet. This event suggests a means to probe the detection threshold, by analyzing a large sample of events like MOA-2011-BLG-293, which have both followup data and high cadence survey data, to provide a guide for the interpretation of pure survey microlensing data.
  • We report the discovery of a planet with a high planet-to-star mass ratio in the microlensing event MOA-2009-BLG-387, which exhibited pronounced deviations over a 12-day interval, one of the longest for any planetary event. The host is an M dwarf, with a mass in the range 0.07 M_sun < M_host < 0.49M_sun at 90% confidence. The planet-star mass ratio q = 0.0132 +- 0.003 has been measured extremely well, so at the best-estimated host mass, the planet mass is m_p = 2.6 Jupiter masses for the median host mass, M = 0.19 M_sun. The host mass is determined from two "higher order" microlensing parameters. One of these, the angular Einstein radius \theta_E = 0.31 +- 0.03 mas, is very well measured, but the other (the microlens parallax \pi_E, which is due to the Earth's orbital motion) is highly degenate with the orbital motion of the planet. We statistically resolve the degeneracy between Earth and planet orbital effects by imposing priors from a Galactic model that specifies the positions and velocities of lenses and sources and a Kepler model of orbits. The 90% confidence intervals for the distance, semi-major axis, and period of the planet are 3.5 kpc < D_L < 7.9 kpc, 1.1 AU < a < 2.7AU, and 3.8 yr < P < 7.6 yr, respectively.
  • We report the detection of sub-Saturn-mass planet MOA-2008-BLG-310Lb and argue that it is the strongest candidate yet for a bulge planet. Deviations from the single-lens fit are smoothed out by finite-source effects and so are not immediately apparent from the light curve. Nevertheless, we find that a model in which the primary has a planetary companion is favored over the single-lens model by \Delta\chi^2 ~ 880 for an additional three degrees of freedom. Detailed analysis yields a planet/star mass ratio q=(3.3+/-0.3)x10^{-4} and an angular separation between the planet and star within 10% of the angular Einstein radius. The small angular Einstein radius, \theta_E=0.155+/-0.011 mas, constrains the distance to the lens to be D_L>6.0 kpc if it is a star (M_L>0.08 M_sun). This is the only microlensing exoplanet host discovered so far that must be in the bulge if it is a star. By analyzing VLT NACO adaptive optics images taken near the baseline of the event, we detect additional blended light that is aligned to within 130 mas of the lensed source. This light is plausibly from the lens, but could also be due to a companion to lens or source, or possibly an unassociated star. If the blended light is indeed due to the lens, we can estimate the mass of the lens, M_L=0.67+/-0.14 M_sun, planet mass m=74+/-17 M_Earth, and projected separation between the planet and host, 1.25+/-0.10 AU, putting it right on the "snow line". If not, then the planet has lower mass, is closer to its host and is colder. To distinguish among these possibilities on reasonable timescales would require obtaining Hubble Space Telescope images almost immediately, before the source-lens relative motion of \mu=5 mas yr^{-1} causes them to separate substantially.