• The spacelike reduction of the Chern-Simons Lagrangian yields a modified Nonlinear Schr\"odinger Equation (jNLS) where in the non-linearity the particle density is replaced by current. When the phase is linear in the position, this latter is an ordinary NLS with time-dependent coefficients which admits interesting solutions, whose arisal is explained by the conformal properties of non-relativistic spacetime. However, only the usual travelling soliton is consistent with the jNLS. Adding a six-order potential converts jnLS into an integrable equation.
  • The RG functions of the 2D $n$-vector $\phi^4$ model are calculated in the five-loop approximation. Perturbative series for the $\beta$ function and critical exponents are resummed by the Pade-Borel and Pade-Borel-Leroy techniques, resummation procedures are optimized and an accuracy of the numerical results is estimated. In the Ising case $n = 1$ as well as in the others ($n = 0$, $n = -1$, $n = 2, 3,...32$) an account for the five-loop term is found to shift the Wilson fixed point location only briefly, leaving it outside the segment formed by the results of the corresponding lattice calculations; even error bars of the RG and lattice estimates do not overlap in the most cases studied. This is argued to reflect the influence of the singular (non-analytical) contribution to the $\beta$ function that can not be found perturbatively. The evaluation of the critical exponents for $n = 1$, $n = 0$ and $n = -1$ in the five-loop approximation and comparison of the numbers obtained with their known exact counterparts confirm the conclusion that non-analytical contributions are visible in two dimensions.
  • Erratum: In our paper, we show that the spectral representation for isotropic two-component composites also applies to uniaxial polycrystals. We have learned that this result was, in fact, first conjectured by G.W. Milton. While our derivation is more detailed, our result for the spectral function is the same as Milton's. We very much regret not having been aware of this work at the time of writing our paper. Original abstract: We extend the spectral theory used for the calculation of the effective linear response functions of composites to the case of a polycrystalline material with uniaxially anisotropic microscopic symmetry. As an application, we combine these results with a nonlinear decoupling approximation as modified by Ma et al., to calculate the third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility of a uniaxial polycrystal, assuming that the effective dielectric function of the polycrystal can be calculated within the effective-medium approximation.
  • Using Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that including ionized impurity scattering in models of Si$_{(1-x)}$Ge$_x$ is vital in order to predict the correct Hall parameters. Our results show good agreement with the experimental data of Joelsson et.al. (JAP, 1997).
  • It should be possible to improve hot-hole laser performance by moving from bulk materials to a quantum well structure. The extra design parameters enable us to alter the band structure by changing the crystal orientation of the growth direction; to use the well width to shift the subband offsets, enabling the effect of the LO phonon scattering cut-off to be controlled; and to use modulation doping to ensure a high hole concentration to increase the gain without the dopants being present in the gain region. We present the first simulations of THz quantum well hot-hole lasers that can produce inversion and optical gain.
  • Vibrational spectra of polyatomic molecules are often obtained from a polynomial expansion of the adiabatic potential around a minimum. For several molecules, we show that such an approximation displays an unphysical saddle point of comparatively small energy, leading to a region where the potential is negative and unbounded. This poses an upper limit for a reliable evaluation of vibrational levels. We argue that the presence of such saddle points is general.
  • We study the dynamic response of a [111] quantum impurity, such as lithium or cyanide in alkali halides, with respect to an external field coupling to the elastic quadrupole moment. Because of the particular level structure of a eight-state system on a cubic site, the elastic response function shows a biexponential relaxation feature and a van Vleck type contribution with a resonance frequency that is twice the tunnel frequency $\Delta/\hbar$. This basically differs from the dielectric response that does not show relaxation. Moreover, we show that the elastic response of a [111] impurity cannot be reduced to that of a two-level system. In the experimental part, we report on recent sound velocity and internal friction measurements on KCl doped with cyanide at various concentrations. At low doping (45 ppm) we find the dynamics of a single [111] impurity, whereas at higher concentrations (4700 ppm) the elastic response rather indicates strongly correlated defects. Our theoretical model provides a good description of the temperature dependence of $\delta v/v$ and $Q^{-1}$ at low doping, in particular the relaxation peaks, the absolute values of the amplitude, and the resonant contributions. From our fits we obtain the value of the elastic deformation potential $\gamma_t=0.192$ eV.
  • The nonequilibrium dynamic phase transition, in the two dimensional site diluted kinetic Ising model in presence of an oscillating magnetic field, has been studied by Monte Carlo simulation. The projections of dynamical phase boundary (surface) are drawn in the planes formed by the dilution and field amplitude and the plane formed by temperature and field amplitude. The tricritical behaviour is found to be absent in this case.
  • We measured the thermal conductivity of an icosahedral quasicrystal i-Al_{72}Pd_{19.5}Mn_{8.5} in the temperature range between 0.4 K and 300 K. The analysis of the low-temperature results was based on a Debye-type model. The results of the analysis for the two temperature regions of 0.4 K <T<40 K and 0.4 K <T<1 K, are not consistent in the sense that a tunnelling-states contribution to phonon scattering is verified only for 0.4 K <T<1 K. The same fitting procedure indicates that structural defects of the stacking-fault type are an important source of phonon scattering. Their physical presence was cleary identified by a transmission electron microscopy experiment.
  • Realization of a robust nanotube-heterostructure tunneling transistors [Solid State Comm. 116, p. 569 (2000)] requires the difficult formation [Science 293, p. 76 (2001)] of a central nanoscale barrier separating a pair of outside metallic leads. Here I suggest an alternative surface-based assembly based on self-organization of one-dimensional metallic states on oxides and trapping well-resolved resonant orbitals in a central island. I present and explain the (universal) transistor characteristics and robustness. In addition, I calculate typical the island/level-to-gate capacitance to predict ultrafast (beyond-THz) switching but also document a limited importance of Coulomb blockade effects in the (nanotube) resonant-tunneling transistors.
  • The spin-spin correlation function of the spherical model being precisely at an anisotropic Lifshitz point of arbitrary order is calculated exactly. The results are in agreement with scaling. The scaling function is shown to be universal. The direction-dependent long-range correlations may change from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic behaviour and back as the dimension is varied. The form of the scaling function is compared to predictions following from local scale invariance for strongly anisotropic critical systems.
  • This paper has been withdrawn by the authors due to substantial changes.
  • A dynamic model of the social relations between workers and capitalists is introduced. The model is deduced from the assumption that the law of value is an organising principle of modern economies. The model self-organises into a dynamic equilibrium with statistical properties that are in close qualitative and in many cases quantitative agreement with a broad range of known empirical distributions of developed capitalism, including the power-law distribution of firm size, the Laplace distribution of firm and GDP growth, the lognormal distribution of firm demises, the exponential distribution of the duration of recessions, the lognormal-Pareto distribution of income, and the gamma-like distribution of the rate-of-profit of firms. Normally these distributions are studied in isolation, but this model unifies and connects them within a single causal framework. In addition, the model generates business cycle phenomena, including fluctuating wage and profit shares in national income about values consistent with empirical studies. A testable consequence of the model is a conjecture that the rate-of-profit distribution is consistent with a parameter-mix of a ratio of normal variates with means and variances that depend on a firm size parameter that is distributed according to a power-law.
  • Ormerod and Mounfield analysed GDP data of 17 leading capitalist economies from 1870 to 1994 and concluded that the frequency of the duration of recessions is consistent with a power-law. But in fact the data is consistent with an exponential (Boltzmann-Gibbs) law.
  • Systematic impurity doping in the Cu-O plane of the hole-doped cuprate superconductors may allow one to decide between unconvention al ("d-wave") and anisotropic conventional ("s-wave") states as possible candidates for the order parameter in these materials. We show that potential scattering of any strength always increases the gap minima of such s-wave states, leading to activated behavior in temperature with characteristic impurity concentration dependence in observable quantities such as the penetration depth. A magnetic component to the scattering may destroy the energy gap and give rise to conventional gapless behavior, or lead to a nonmonotonic dependence of the gap on impurity concentration. We discuss how experiments constrain this analysis.
  • Structure of hot dense matter at subnuclear densities is investigated by quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations. We analyze nucleon distributions and nuclear shapes using two-point correlation functions and Minkowski functionals to determine the phase-separation line and to classify the phase of nuclear matter in terms of the nuclear structure. Obtained phase diagrams show that the density of the phase boundaries between the different nuclear structures decreases with increasing temperature due to the thermal expansion of nuclear matter region. The critical temperature for the phase separation is $\agt 6$ MeV for the proton fraction $x=0.5$ and $\agt 5$ MeV for $x=0.3$. Our result suggests the existence of "spongelike" phases with negative Euler characteristic in addition to the simple "pasta" phases in supernova cores until $T \alt 3$ MeV.
  • We introduce the theoretical framework we use to study the bewildering variety of phases in condensed--matter physics. We emphasize the importance of the breaking of symmetries, and develop the idea of an order parameter through several examples. We discuss elementary excitations and the topological theory of defects.
  • We demonstrate that quark matter in the color-flavor locked phase of QCD is rigorously electrically neutral, despite the unequal quark masses, and even in the presence of an electron chemical potential. As long as the strange quark mass and the electron chemical potential do not preclude the color-flavor locked phase, quark matter is automatically neutral. No electrons are required and none are admitted.
  • According to Lipatov, the high orders of perturbation theory are determined by saddle-point configurations (instantons) of the corresponding functional integrals. According to t'Hooft, some individual large diagrams, renormalons, are also significant and they are not contained in the Lipatov contribution. The history of the conception of renormalons is presented, and the arguments in favor of and against their significance are discussed. The analytic properties of the Borel transforms of functional integrals, Green functions, vertex parts, and scaling functions are investigated in the case of \phi^4 theory. Their analyticity in a complex plane with a cut from the first instanton singularity to infinity (the Le Guillou - Zinn-Justin hypothesis) is proved. It rules out the existence of the renormalon singularities pointed out by t'Hooft and demonstrates the nonconstructiveness of the conception of renormalons as a whole. The results can be interpreted as an indication of the internal consistency of \phi^4 theory.
  • We postulate that consciousness is intrinsically connected to quantum spin since the latter is the origin of quantum effects in both Bohm and Hestenes quantum formulisms and a fundamental quantum process associated with the structure of space-time. Applying these ideas to the particular structures and dynamics of the brain, we have developed a detailed model of quantum consciousness. We have also carried out experiments from the perspective of our theory to test the possibility of quantum-entangling the quantum entities inside the brain with those of an external chemical substance. We found that applying magnetic pulses to the brain when an anaesthetic was placed in between caused the brain to feel the effect of said anaesthetic as if the test subject had actually inhaled the same. We further found that drinking water exposed to magnetic pulses, laser light or microwave when an anaesthetic was placed in between also causes brain effects in various degrees. Additional experiments indicate that the said brain effect is indeed the consequence of quantum entanglement. Recently we have studied non-local effects in simple physics systems. We have found that the pH value, temperature and gravity of a liquid in the detecting reservoirs can be non-locally affected through manipulating another liquid in a remote reservoir quantum-entangled with the former. In particular, the pH value changes in the same direction as that being manipulated; the temperature can change against that of local environment; and the gravity can change against local gravity. We suggest that they are mediated by quantum entanglement between nuclear and/or electron spins in treated liquid and discuss the profound implications of these results. This paper now also includes materials on further development of the theory and related topics.
  • Form factor representation of the correlation function of the 2D Ising model on a cylinder is generalized to the case of arbitrary disposition of correlating spins. The magnetic susceptibility on a lattice, one of whose dimensions ($N$) is finite, is calculated in both para- and ferromagnetic regions of parameters of the model. The singularity structure of the susceptibility in the complex temperature plane at finite values of $N$ and the thermodynamic limit $N\to\infty$ are discussed.
  • We consider a two-dimensional Bose gas formed in a planar atomic trap in conditions where the two-dimensional scattering length exceeds all other microscopic length scales in the system and, accordingly, the gas parameter assumes relatively high values. We show that, unlike in the three-dimensional case, for sufficiently low areal densities the two-dimensional gas remains stable against collapse even in the resonant regime. Furthermore, we evaluate the three-body recombination rate that sets the upper limit for the life-time of two-dimensional resonant atomic condensate.
  • We compare two widely used models for dephasing in a chaotic quantum dot: The introduction of a fictitious voltage probe into the scattering matrix and the addition of an imaginary potential to the Hamiltonian. We identify the limit in which the two models are equivalent and compute the distribution of the conductance in that limit. Our analysis explains why previous treatments of dephasing gave different results. The distribution remains non-Gaussian for strong dephasing if the coupling of the quantum dot to the electron reservoirs is via ballistic single-mode point contacts, but becomes Gaussian if the coupling is via tunneling contacts.
  • We present a formalism for Newtonian multi-fluid hydrodynamics derived from an unconstrained variational principle. This approach provides a natural way of obtaining the general equations of motion for a wide range of hydrodynamic systems containing an arbitrary number of interacting fluids and superfluids. In addition to spatial variations we use ``time shifts'' in the variational principle, which allows us to describe dissipative processes with entropy creation, such as chemical reactions, friction or the effects of external non-conservative forces. The resulting framework incorporates the generalization of the entrainment effect originally discussed in the case of the mixture of two superfluids by Andreev and Bashkin. In addition to the conservation of energy and momentum, we derive the generalized conservation laws of vorticity and helicity, and the special case of Ertel's theorem for the single perfect fluid. We explicitly discuss the application of this framework to thermally conducting fluids, superfluids, and superfluid neutron star matter. The equations governing thermally conducting fluids are found to be more general than the standard description, as the effect of entrainment usually seems to be overlooked in this context. In the case of superfluid He4 we recover the Landau--Khalatnikov equations of the two-fluid model via a translation to the ``orthodox'' framework of superfluidity, which is based on a rather awkward choice of variables. Our two-fluid model for superfluid neutron star matter allows for dissipation via mutual friction and also ``transfusion'' via beta-reactions between the neutron fluid and the proton-electron fluid.
  • We explain in detail how to estimate mean values and assess statistical errors for arbitrary functions of elementary observables in Monte Carlo simulations. The method is to estimate and sum the relevant autocorrelation functions, which is argued to produce more certain error estimates than binning techniques and hence to help toward a better exploitation of expensive simulations. An effective integrated autocorrelation time is computed which is suitable to benchmark efficiencies of simulation algorithms with regard to specific observables of interest. A Matlab code is offered for download that implements the method. It can also combine independent runs (replica) allowing to judge their consistency.