• Particle accelerators are invaluable tools for research in the basic and applied sciences, in fields such as materials science, chemistry, the biosciences, particle physics, nuclear physics and medicine. The design, commissioning, and operation of accelerator facilities is a non-trivial task, due to the large number of control parameters and the complex interplay of several conflicting design goals. We propose to tackle this problem by means of multi-objective optimization algorithms which also facilitate a parallel deployment. In order to compute solutions in a meaningful time frame a fast and scalable software framework is required. In this paper, we present the implementation of such a general-purpose framework for simulation-based multi-objective optimization methods that allows the automatic investigation of optimal sets of machine parameters. The implementation is based on a master/slave paradigm, employing several masters that govern a set of slaves executing simulations and performing optimization tasks. Using evolutionary algorithms as the optimizer and OPAL as the forward solver, validation experiments and results of multi-objective optimization problems in the domain of beam dynamics are presented. The high charge beam line at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Facility was used as the beam dynamics model. The 3D beam size, transverse momentum, and energy spread were optimized.
  • Recent studies of the performance of radio-frequency (RF) copper cavities operated at cryogenic temperatures have shown a dramatic increase in the maximum achievable surface electric field. We propose to exploit this development to enable a new generation of photoinjectors operated at cryogenic temperatures that may attain, through enhancement of the launch field at the photocathode, a significant increase in five-dimensional electron beam brightness. We present detailed studies of the beam dynamics associated with such a system, by examining an S-band photoinjector operated at 250 MV/m peak electric field that reaches normalized emittances in the 40 nm-rad range at charges (100-200 pC) suitable for use in a hard X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) scenario based on the LCLS. In this case, we show by start-to-end simulations that the properties of this source may give rise to high efficiency operation of an XFEL, and permit extension of the photon energy reach by an order of magnitude, to over 80 keV. The brightness needed for such XFELs is achieved through low source emittances in tandem with high current after compression. In the XFEL examples analyzed, the emittances during final compression are preserved using micro-bunching techniques. Extreme low emittance scenarios obtained at pC charge, appropriate for significantly extending temporal resolution limits of ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy experiments, are also reviewed. While the increase in brightness in a cryogenic photoinjector is mainly due to the augmentation of the emission current density via field enhancement, further possible increases in performance arising from lowering the intrinsic cathode emittance in cryogenic operation are also analyzed. Issues in experimental implementation, including cavity optimization for lowering cryogenic thermal dissipation, external coupling, and cryo-cooler system are discussed.
  • Using a cyclotron based model problem, we demonstrate for the first time the applicability and usefulness of a uncertainty quantification (UQ) approach in order to construct surrogate models for quantities such as emittance, energy spread but also the halo parameter, and construct a global sensitivity analysis together with error propagation and $L_{2}$ error analysis. The model problem is selected in a way that it represents a template for general high intensity particle accelerator modelling tasks. The presented physics problem has to be seen as hypothetical, with the aim to demonstrate the usefulness and applicability of the presented UQ approach and not solving a particulate problem. The proposed UQ approach is based on sparse polynomial chaos expansions and relies on a small number of high fidelity particle accelerator simulations. Within this UQ framework, the identification of most important uncertainty sources is achieved by performing a global sensitivity analysis via computing the so-called Sobols' indices.
  • In order to handle extremely-high stored energy in future proton-proton colliders, an extremely high-efficiency collimation system is required for safe operation. At LHC, the major limiting locations in terms of particle losses on superconducting (SC) magnets are the dispersion suppressors (DS) downstream of the transverse collimation insertion. These losses are due to the protons experiencing single diffractive interactions in the primary collimators. How to solve this problem is very important for future proton-proton colliders, such as the FCC-hh and SPPC. In this article, a novel method is proposed, which arranges both the transverse and momentum collimation in the same long straight section. In this way, the momentum collimation system can clean those particles related to the single diffractive effect. The effectiveness of the method has been confirmed by multi-particle simulations. In addition, SC quadrupoles with special designs such as enlarged aperture and good shielding are adopted to enhance the phase advance in the transverse collimation section, so that tertiary collimators can be arranged to clean off the tertiary halo which emerges from the secondary collimators and improve the collimation efficiency. With one more collimation stage in the transverse collimation, the beam losses in both the momentum collimation section and the experimental regions can be largely reduced. Multi-particle simulation results with the MERLIN code confirm the effectiveness of the collimation method. At last, we provide a protection scheme of the SC magnets in the collimation section. The FLUKA simulations show that by adding some special protective collimators in front of the magnets, the maximum power deposition in the SC coils is reduced dramatically, which is proven to be valid for protecting the SC magnets from quenching.
  • Elegant is an accelerator physics and particle-beam dynamics code widely used for modeling and design of a variety of high-energy particle accelerators and accelerator-based systems. In this paper we discuss a recently developed version of the code that can take advantage of CUDA-enabled graphics processing units (GPUs) to achieve significantly improved performance for a large class of simulations that are important in practice. The GPU version is largely defined by a framework that simplifies implementations of the fundamental kernel types that are used by Elegant: particle operations, reductions, particle loss, histograms, array convolutions and random number generation. Accelerated performance on the Titan Cray XK-7 supercomputer is approximately 6-10 times better with the GPU than all the CPU cores associated with the same node count. In addition to performance, the maintainability of the GPU-accelerated version of the code was considered a key design objective. Accuracy with respect to the CPU implementation is also a core consideration. Four different methods are used to ensure that the accelerated code faithfully reproduces the CPU results.
  • A problem of coupled-beam instability is solved for two multibunch beams with slightly different revolution frequencies, as in the Fermilab Recycler Ring (RR). Sharing of the inter-bunch growth rates between the intra-bunch modes is described. The general analysis is applied to the RR; possibilities to stabilize the beams by means of chromaticity and feedback are considered.
  • To understand and control the dynamics in the longitudinal phase space, time-resolved measurements of different bunch parameters are required. For a reconstruction of this phase space, the detector systems have to be synchronized. This reconstruction can be used e.g. for studies of the micro-bunching instability. It occurs if the interaction of the bunch with its own radiation leads to the formation of sub-structures on the longitudinal bunch profile. These sub-structures can grow rapidly -- leading to a sawtooth-like behaviour of the bunch. At KARA, we use a fast-gated intensified camera for energy spread studies, Schottky diodes for coherent synchrotron radiation studies as well as electro-optical spectral decoding for longitudinal bunch profile measurements. For a synchronization, a hardware synchronization scheme is used which compensates for eventual hardware delays. In this paper, the different experimental setups and their synchronization are discussed and first results of synchronous measurements are presented.
  • Linac Envelope Optics (1508.03668)

    Sept. 24, 2018 physics.acc-ph
    I develop the formalism that allows calculation of beam envelopes through a linear accelerator given its on-axis electric field. Space charge can naturally be added using Sacherer formalism. A complicating feature is that the reference particle's energy-time coordinates are not known a priori. Since first order matrix formalism applies to deviations from the reference particle, this means the reference particle's time and energy must be calculated simultaneously with the beam envelope and transfer matrix. The code TRANSOPTR is used to track envelopes for general elements whose infinitesimal transfer matrices are known, and in the presence of space charge. Incorporation of the linac algorithm into TRANSOPTR is described, and some examples given.
  • The FermiCORD code system, a set of codes based on MARS15 that calculates the accelerator-induced residual doses at experimental facilities of arbitrary configurations, has been developed. FermiCORD is written in C++ as an add-on to Fortran-based MARS15. The FermiCORD algorithm consists of two stages: 1) simulation of residual doses on contact with the surfaces surrounding the studied location and of radionuclide inventories in the structures surrounding those locations using MARS15, and 2) simulation of the emission of the nuclear decay $\gamma$-quanta by the residuals in the activated structures and scoring the prompt doses of these $\gamma$-quanta at arbitrary distances from those structures. The FermiCORD code system has been benchmarked against similar algorithms based on other code systems and against experimental data from the CERF facility at CERN, and FermiCORD showed reasonable agreement with these. The code system has been applied for calculation of the residual dose of the target station for the Mu2e experiment and the results have been compared to approximate dosimetric approaches.
  • Antiprotons are produced at CERN by colliding a 26 GeV/c proton beam with a fixed target made of a 3 mm diameter, 55 mm length iridium core. The inherent characteristics of antiproton production involve extremely high energy depositions inside the target when impacted by each primary proton beam, making it one of the most dynamically demanding among high energy solid targets in the world, with a rise temperature above 2000 {\deg}C after each pulse impact and successive dynamic pressure waves of the order of GPa's. An optimized redesign of the current target is foreseen for the next 20 years of operation. As a first step in the design procedure, this numerical study delves into the fundamental phenomena present in the target material core under proton pulse impact and subsequent pressure wave propagation by the use of hydrocodes. Three major phenomena have been identified, (i) the dominance of a high frequency radial wave which produces destructive compressive-to-tensile pressure response (ii) The existence of end-of-pulse tensile waves and its relevance on the overall response (iii) A reduction of 40% in tensile pressure could be obtained by the use of a high density tantalum cladding.
  • We discuss the distributed matching scheme in accelerators where control of transverse beam phase space, oscillation, and transport is accomplished by flexible distribution of focusing elements beyond dedicated matching sections. Besides freeing accelerator design from fixed matching sections, such a scheme has many operational advantages, and enables fluid optics manipulation not possible in conventional schemes. Combined with an interpolation scheme this can bring about a new paradigm for efficient, flexible, and robust optics control. A rigorous and deterministic algorithm is developed for its realization. The algorithm is a matching tool in its own right with unique characteristics in robustness and determinism. The beam phase space dynamics is naturally integrated into the algorithm, instead of being treated as generic numerical parameters as in traditional schemes. It is applicable to a wider range of problems, such as trading-off between competing options for desired machine states.
  • Recently, neural networks have found many applications in different fields including Genetics, Pharmacy, Astrophysics and High Energy Physics [1-3]. In the field of accelerator physics it has been used for control systems [4]. In this paper we present the results based on machine learning techniques motivated to predict the behaviour of ion source in terms of composition of the ion beam while using hydrogen gas to produce $H^+$ ions. In the framework of the stellarator type Figure-8 Storage Ring (F8SR) project, a volume type ion source was designed for the low energy ion beam transport experiments. In a first step the functioning of this ion source was studied and the results were published, but only small number of measurements were analysed as the main requirement for the on going experiment was fulfilled. Though at a later stage, more number of measurements were recorded with larger parameter space to investigate the properties of extracted ion beams from this source further. With recent interests and improved techniques in the applications of machine learning algorithms data analysis using neural network has been applied to study the ion beams from this ion source.
  • Transverse beam echoes can be excited with a single dipole kick followed by a single quadrupole kick. They have been used to measure diffusion in hadron beams and have other diagnostic capabilities. Here we develop theories of the transverse echo nonlinear in both the dipole and quadrupole kick strengths. The theories predict the maximum echo amplitudes and the optimum strength parameters. We find that the echo amplitude increases with smaller beam emittance and the asymptotic echo amplitude can exceed half the initial dipole kick amplitude. We show that multiple echoes can be observed provided the dipole kick is large enough. The spectrum of the echo pulse can be used to determine the nonlinear detuning parameter with small amplitude dipole kicks. Simulations are performed to check the theoretical predictions. In the useful ranges of dipole and quadrupole strengths, they are shown to be in reasonable agreement.
  • New physics has traditionally been expected in the high-$p_T$ region at high-energy collider experiments. If new particles are light and weakly-coupled, however, this focus may be completely misguided: light particles are typically highly concentrated within a few mrad of the beam line, allowing sensitive searches with small detectors, and even extremely weakly-coupled particles may be produced in large numbers there. We propose a new experiment, ForwArd Search ExpeRiment, or FASER, which would be placed downstream of the ATLAS or CMS interaction point (IP) in the very forward region and operated concurrently there. Two representative on-axis locations are studied: a far location, $400~\text{m}$ from the IP and just off the beam tunnel, and a near location, just $150~\text{m}$ from the IP and right behind the TAN neutral particle absorber. For each location, we examine leading neutrino- and beam-induced backgrounds. As a concrete example of light, weakly-coupled particles, we consider dark photons produced through light meson decay and proton bremsstrahlung. We find that even a relatively small and inexpensive cylindrical detector, with a radius of $\sim 10~\text{cm}$ and length of $5-10~\text{m}$, depending on the location, can discover dark photons in a large and unprobed region of parameter space with dark photon mass $m_{A'} \sim 10~\text{MeV} - 1~\text{GeV}$ and kinetic mixing parameter $\epsilon \sim 10^{-7} - 10^{-3}$. FASER will clearly also be sensitive to many other forms of new physics. We conclude with a discussion of topics for further study that will be essential for understanding FASER's feasibility, optimizing its design, and realizing its discovery potential.
  • We discuss the main factors affecting the design of accelerators aiming to investigate physics at the GUT scale. The most important constraints turn out to be the energy used and the time taken to accumulate sufficient luminosity. We propose a photon collider design, where the photons are generated by undulator radiation from high energy muon beams. This reduces the energy requirements by a factor of $10^7$ compared to a pp collider. Much of the reduction in energy use is achieved by using a periodic magnetic field to prevent a cascade of secondary reactions at the collision points. The proposed collider would be powered by (part of) a Dyson swarm constructed around the Sun, and efficient use of energy will be important to reduce the time needed to reach the desired number of collisions.
  • The Q-factor of superconducting accelerating cavities can be substantially improved by a special heat treatment under N2 atmosphere (N-doping). Recent experiments at Fermi National Laboratory investigated the dependence of Q on the RF frequency and showed, unexpectedly, both an increase and a decrease with the RF field amplitude. This paper shall explain this finding by extending a previously proposed model founded on the two fluid model of RF losses, percolation and the proximity effect in a disordered composite.
  • Plasma wake-field acceleration is one of the main technologies being developed for future high-energy colliders. Potentially, it can create a cost-effective path to the highest possible energies for e+e- or {\gamma}-{\gamma} colliders and produce a profound effect on the developments for high-energy physics. Acceleration in a blowout regime, where all plasma electrons are swept away from the axis, is presently considered to be the primary choice for beam acceleration. In this paper, we derive a universal efficiency-instability relation, between the power efficiency and the key instability parameter of the trailing bunch for beam acceleration in the blowout regime. We also show that the suppression of instability in the trailing bunch can be achieved through BNS damping by the introduction of a beam energy variation along the bunch. Unfortunately, in the high efficiency regime, the required energy variation is quite high, and is not presently compatible with collider-quality beams. We would like to stress that the development of the instability imposes a fundamental limitation on the acceleration efficiency, and it is unclear how it could be overcome for high-luminosity linear colliders. With minor modifications, the considered limitation on the power efficiency is applicable to other types of acceleration.
  • Laser-assisted stripping is a novel approach to H- charge exchange that overcomes long-standing limitations associated with the traditional, foil-based method of producing high-intensity, time-structured beams of protons. This paper reports on the first successful demonstration of the laser stripping technique for microsecond duration beams. The experiment represents a factor of 1000 increase in the stripped pulse duration compared with the previous proof-of-principle demonstration. The central theme of the experiment is the implementation of methods to reduce the required average laser power such that high efficiency stripping can be accomplished for microsecond duration beams using conventional laser technology. The experiment was performed on the Spallation Neutron Source 1 GeV H- beam using a 1 MW peak power UV laser and resulted in ~95% stripping efficiency.
  • Streaking of photoelectrons with optical lasers has been widely used for temporal characterization of attosecond extreme ultraviolet pulses. Recently, this technique has been adapted to characterize femtosecond x-ray pulses in free-electron lasers with the streaking imprinted by farinfrared and Terahertz (THz) pulses. Here, we report successful implementation of THz streaking for time-stamping of an ultrashort relativistic electron beam of which the energy is several orders of magnitude higher than photoelectrons. Such ability is especially important for MeV ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) applications where electron beams with a few femtosecond pulse width may be obtained with longitudinal compression while the arrival time may fluctuate at a much larger time scale. Using this laser-driven THz streaking technique, the arrival time of an ultrashort electron beam with 6 fs (rms) pulse width has been determined with 1.5 fs (rms) accuracy. Furthermore, we have proposed and demonstrated a non-invasive method for correction of the timing jitter with femtosecond accuracy through measurement of the compressed beam energy, which may allow one to advance UED towards sub-10 fs frontier far beyond the ~100 fs (rms) jitter.
  • We report the initial considerations of using linearly polarized optical transition radiation (OTR) to characterize the electron beams of laser plasma accelerators (LPAs) such as at the Univ. of Texas at Austin. The two LPAs operate at 100 MeV and 2-GeV, and they currently have estimated normalized emittances at ~ 1-mm mrad regime with beam divergences less than 1/{\gamma} and beam sizes to be determined at the micron level. Analytical modeling results indicate the feasibility of using these OTR techniques for the LPA applications.
  • We report the initial demonstrations of the use of single crystals in indirect x-ray imaging for x-ray phase contrast imaging at the Washington University in St. Louis Computational Bioimaging Laboratory (CBL). Based on single Gaussian peak fits to the x-ray images, we observed a four times smaller system point spread function (21 {\mu}m (FWHM)) with the 25-mm diameter single crystals than the reference polycrystalline phosphor's 80-{\mu}m value. Potential fiber-optic plate depth-of-focus aspects and 33-{\mu}m diameter carbon fiber imaging are also addressed.
  • The neutrino beam produced from muons decaying in a storage ring would be an ideal tool for precise neutrino cross section measurements and search for sterile neutrinos due to its precisely known flavour content and spectrum. In the proposed nuSTORM facility pions would be directly injected into a racetrack storage ring, where circulating muon beam would be captured. The storage ring has two options: a FODO solution with large aperture quadrupoles and a racetrack FFAG (Fixed Field Alternating Gradient) using the recent developments in FFAGs. Machine parameters, linear optics design and beam dynamics are discussed in this paper.
  • We present experiments and numerical simulations which demonstrate that fully-ionized, low-density plasma channels could be formed by hydrodynamic expansion of plasma columns produced by optical field ionization (OFI). Simulations of the hydrodynamic expansion of plasma columns formed in hydrogen by an axicon lens show the generation of \unit[200]{mm} long plasma channels with axial densities of order $n_e(0) = 1 \times 10^{17} cm^{-3}$ and lowest-order modes of spot size $W_M \approx 40 \mu m$. These simulations show that the laser energy required to generate the channels is modest: of order 1 mJ per centimetre of channel. The simulations are confirmed by experiments with a spherical lens which show the formation of short plasma channels with $1.5 \times 10^{17}cm^{-3} \lesssim n_e(0) \lesssim 1 \times 10^{18} cm^{-3}$ and $61 \mu m \gtrsim W_M \gtrsim 33 \mu m$. Low-density plasma channels of this type would appear to be well-suited as multi-GeV laser-plasma accelerator stages capable of long-term operation at high pulse repetition rates.
  • Though wakefield acceleration in crystal channels has been previously proposed, x-ray wakefield acceleration has only recently become a realistic possibility since the invention of the single-cycled optical laser compression technique. We investigate the acceleration due to a wakefield induced by a coherent, ultrashort x-ray pulse guided by a nanoscale channel inside a solid material. By two-dimensional particle in- cell computer simulations, we show that an acceleration gradient of TeV/cm is attainable. This is about 3 orders of magnitude stronger than that of the conventional plasma-based wakefield accelerations, which implies the possibility of an extremely compact scheme to attain ultrahigh energies. In addition to particle acceleration, this scheme can also induce the emission of high energy photons at ~O(10-100) MeV. Our simulations confirm such high energy photon emissions, which is in contrast with that induced by the optical laser driven wakefield scheme. In addition to this, the significantly improved emittance of the energetic electrons has been discussed.
  • Many modern and most future accelerators rely on precise configuration of lattice and trajectory. The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) at Fermilab that is coming to final stages of construction will be used to test advanced approaches of control over particles dynamics. Various experiments planned at IOTA require high flexibility of lattice configuration as well as high precision of lattice and closed orbit control. Dense element placement does not allow to have ideal configuration of diagnostics and correctors for all planned experiments. To overcome this limitations advanced method of lattice analysis is proposed that can also be beneficial for other machines. Developed algorithm is based on LOCO approach, extended with various sets of other experimental data, such as dispersion, BPM-to-BPM phase advances, beam shape information from synchrotron light monitors, responses of closed orbit bumps to variations of focusing elements and other. Extensive modeling of corrections for a big number of random seed errors is used to illustrate benefits from developed approach.