• For a regular cardinal $\kappa$, a formula of the modal $\mu$-calculus is $\kappa$-continuous in a variable x if, on every model, its interpretation as a unary function of x is monotone and preserves unions of $\kappa$-directed sets. We define the fragment $C_{\aleph_1}(x)$ of the modal $\mu$-calculus and prove that all the formulas in this fragment are $\aleph_1$-continuous. For each formula $\phi(x)$ of the modal $\mu$-calculus, we construct a formula $\psi(x) \in C_{\aleph_1 }(x)$ such that $\phi(x)$ is $\kappa$-continuous, for some $\kappa$, if and only if $\phi(x)$ is equivalent to $\psi(x)$. Consequently, we prove that (i) the problem whether a formula is $\kappa$-continuous for some $\kappa$ is decidable, (ii) up to equivalence, there are only two fragments determined by continuity at some regular cardinal: the fragment $C_{\aleph_0}(x)$ studied by Fontaine and the fragment $C_{\aleph_1}(x)$. We apply our considerations to the problem of characterizing closure ordinals of formulas of the modal $\mu$-calculus. An ordinal $\alpha$ is the closure ordinal of a formula $\phi(x)$ if its interpretation on every model converges to its least fixed-point in at most $\alpha$ steps and if there is a model where the convergence occurs exactly in $\alpha$ steps. We prove that $\omega_1$, the least uncountable ordinal, is such a closure ordinal. Moreover we prove that closure ordinals are closed under ordinal sum. Thus, any formal expression built from 0, 1, $\omega$, $\omega_1$ by using the binary operator symbol + gives rise to a closure ordinal.
  • We show that dyon and magnetic monopole can be constructed in the gauge-independent way for the $SU(2)$ Yang--Mills theory even in the absence of the scalar field. This result is derived from the recent proposal for obtaining non-trivial topological configurations responsible for quark confinement in the Yang-Mills theory based on the Confinement-Higgs complementary relationship between the pure Yang-Mills theory and the gauge-scalar model with an adjoint scalar field of the fixed length. We discuss how such configurations have the implications for quark confinement.
  • The band structure of an Si inverse diamond structure whose lattice point shape was vacant regular octahedrons, was calculated using plane wave expansion method. A complete photonic band gap was theoretically confirmed at around 0.4 THz. It is said that three-dimensional photonic crystals have no polarization anisotropy in photonic band gap (stop gap, stop band) of high symmetry points in normal incidence. However, it was experimentally confirmed that the polarization orientation of a reflected wave was different from that of an incident wave, [I$(X,Y)$], where $(X,Y)$ is the coordinate system fixed in the photonic crystal. It was studied on a plane (001) at around X point's photonic band gap (0.36 $-$ 0.44 THz) for incident wave direction [001] by rotating a sample in the plane (001), relatively. The polarization orientation of the reflected wave was parallel to that of the incident wave when that of the incident wave was I(1, 1) or I(1, $-$1). In contrast, the former was perpendicular to the latter when that of the incident wave was I(1, 0) or I(0, $-$1) at around 0.38 THz. As far as the photonic crystal in this work is concerned, method of resolution and synthesis of the incident polarization vector is not able to apply to the analyses of rotation of the measured reflected spectra in appearance.
  • The presence of certain clinical dermoscopic features within a skin lesion may indicate melanoma, and automatically detecting these features may lead to more quantitative and reproducible diagnoses. We reformulate the task of classifying clinical dermoscopic features within superpixels as a segmentation problem, and propose a fully convolutional neural network to detect clinical dermoscopic features from dermoscopy skin lesion images. Our neural network architecture uses interpolated feature maps from several intermediate network layers, and addresses imbalanced labels by minimizing a negative multi-label Dice-F$_1$ score, where the score is computed across the mini-batch for each label. Our approach ranked first place in the 2017 ISIC-ISBI Part 2: Dermoscopic Feature Classification Task challenge over both the provided validation and test datasets, achieving a 0.895% area under the receiver operator characteristic curve score. We show how simple baseline models can outrank state-of-the-art approaches when using the official metrics of the challenge, and propose to use a fuzzy Jaccard Index that ignores the empty set (i.e., masks devoid of positive pixels) when ranking models. Our results suggest that (i) the classification of clinical dermoscopic features can be effectively approached as a segmentation problem, and (ii) the current metrics used to rank models may not well capture the efficacy of the model. We plan to make our trained model and code publicly available.
  • We revisit the manifestly covariant large $c$ expansion of General Relativity, $c$ being the speed of light. Assuming the relativistic connection has no pole in $c^{-2}$, this expansion is known to reproduce Newton-Cartan gravity and a covariant version of Post-Newtonian corrections to it. We show that relaxing this assumption leads to the inclusion of twistless torsion in the effective non-relativistic theory. We argue that the resulting TTNC theory is an effective description of a non-relativistic regime of General Relativity that extends Newtonian physics by including strong gravitational time dilation.
  • The rapid growth of IoT driven by recent advancements in consumer electronics, 5G communication technologies, and cloud-computing enabled big-data analytics, has recently attracted tremendous attention from both the industry and academia. One of the major open challenges for IoT is the limited network lifetime due to massive IoT devices being powered by batteries with finite capacities. The low-power and low-complexity backscatter communications (BackCom), which simply relies on passive reflection and modulation of an incident radio-frequency (RF) wave, has emerged to be a promising technology for tackling this challenge. However, the contemporary BackCom has several major limitations, such as short transmission range, low data rate, and uni-directional information transmission. The article aims at introducing the recent advances in the active area of BackCom. Specifically, we provide a systematic introduction of the next generation BackCom covering basic principles, systems, techniques besides IoT applications. Lastly, we describe the IoT application scenarios with the next generation BackCom.
  • We prove that square-tiled surfaces having fixed combinatorics of horizontal cylinder decomposition and tiled with smaller and smaller squares become asymptotically equidistributed in any ambient linear $GL(\mathbb R)$-invariant suborbifold defined over $\mathbb Q$ in the moduli space of Abelian differentials. Moreover, we prove that the combinatorics of the horizontal and of the vertical decompositions are asymptotically uncorrelated. As a consequence, we prove the existence of an asymptotic distribution for the combinatorics of a "random" interval exchange transformation with integer lengths. We compute explicitly the absolute contribution of square-tiled surfaces having a single horizontal cylinder to the Masur-Veech volume of any ambient stratum of Abelian differentials. The resulting count is particularly simple and efficient in the large genus asymptotics. We conjecture that the corresponding relative contribution is asymptotically of the order $1/d$, where $d$ is the dimension of the stratum, and prove that this conjecture is equivalent to the long-standing conjecture on the large genus asymptotics of the Masur-Veech volumes. We prove, in particular, that the recent results of Chen, M\"oller and Zagier imply that the conjecture holds for the principal stratum of Abelian differentials as the genus tends to infinity. Our result on random interval exchanges with integer lengths allows to make empirical computation of the probability to get a $1$-cylinder pillowcase cover taking a "random" one in a given stratum. We use this technique to derive the approximate values of the Masur-Veech volumes of strata of quadratic differentials of all small dimensions.
  • It is well recognised that animal and plant pathogens form complex ecological communities of interacting organisms within their hosts. Although community ecology approaches have been applied to determine pathogen interactions at the within-host scale, methodologies enabling robust inference of the epidemiological impact of pathogen interactions are lacking. Here we developed a novel statistical framework to identify statistical covariances from the infection time-series of multiple pathogens simultaneously. Our framework extends Bayesian multivariate disease mapping models to analyse multivariate time series data by accounting for within- and between-year dependencies in infection risk and incorporating a between-pathogen covariance matrix which we estimate. Importantly, our approach accounts for possible confounding drivers of temporal patterns in pathogen infection frequencies, enabling robust inference of pathogen-pathogen interactions. We illustrate the validity of our statistical framework using simulated data and applied it to diagnostic data available for five respiratory viruses co-circulating in a major urban population between 2005 and 2013: adenovirus, human coronavirus, human metapneumovirus, influenza B virus and respiratory syncytial virus. We found positive and negative covariances indicative of epidemiological interactions among specific virus pairs. This statistical framework enables a community ecology perspective to be applied to infectious disease epidemiology with important utility for public health planning and preparedness.
  • To allow for Division By Zero, we develop a new algebraic structure containing addition and multiplication called an S-Extension of a Field. This unique structure extends a Field so that the equation $0\cdot s=x$ has exactly one solution for every non-zero Field element $x$. Furthermore, a different solution is obtained for each choice of $x$, making this solution unique to that particular equation. However, the equation $0\cdot s=0$ has two or more solutions, with no preference towards any one particular solution. This allows us to use the usual definition of division as the solution to the equation $0\cdot s=x$ to evaluate $x$ divided by $0$. And if $x\not=0$, every ${x\over 0}$ is a unique element that is also unique to that particular $x$ while ${0\over 0}$ remains indeterminate. This creates a Division By Zero which significantly differs from other attempts at Division By Zero.
  • The complex method of interpolation, going back to Calder\'on and Coifman et al., on the one hand, and the Alexander-Wermer-Slodkowski theorem on polynomial hulls with convex fibers, on the other hand, are generalized to a method of interpolation of real (finite-dimensional) Banach spaces and of convex functions. The underlying duality in this method is given by the Legendre transform. Our results can also be interpreted as new properties of solutions of the homogeneous complex Monge-Amp\`ere equation.
  • $Q$-systems and $T$-systems are systems of integrable difference equations that have recently attracted much attention, and have wide applications in representation theory and statistical mechanics. We show that certain $\tau$-functions, given as matrix elements of the action of the loop group of ${\rm GL}_{2}$ on two-component fermionic Fock space, give solutions of a $Q$-system. An obvious generalization using the loop group of ${\rm GL}_3$ acting on three-component fermionic Fock space leads to a new system of 4 difference equations.
  • This paper studies fractional integral operator for vector fields in weighted $L^1$. Using the estimates on fractional integral operator and Stein-Weiss inequalities, we can give a new proof for a class of Caffarelli-Kohn-Nirenberg inequalities and establish new $\divg$-$\curl$ inequalities for vector fields.
  • The concept of open weak CAD is introduced. Every open CAD is an open weak CAD. On the contrary, an open weak CAD is not necessarily an open CAD. An algorithm for computing projection polynomials of open weak CADs is proposed. The key idea is to compute the intersection of projection factor sets produced by different projection orders. The resulting open weak CAD often has smaller number of sample points than open CADs. The algorithm can be used for computing sample points for all open connected components of $ f\neq0$ for a given polynomial $f$. It can also be used for many other applications, such as testing semi-definiteness of polynomials and copositive problems. In fact, we solved several difficult semi-definiteness problems efficiently by using the algorithm. Furthermore, applying the algorithm to copositive problems, we find an explicit expression of the polynomials producing open weak CADs under some conditions, which significantly improves the efficiency of solving copositive problems.
  • We propose a new way of defining Hamiltonians for quantum field theories without any renormalization procedure. The resulting Hamiltonians, called IBC Hamiltonians, are mathematically well-defined (and in particular, ultraviolet finite) without an ultraviolet cut-off such as smearing out the particles over a nonzero radius; rather, the particles are assigned radius zero. These Hamiltonians agree with those obtained through renormalization whenever both are known to exist. We describe explicit examples of IBC Hamiltonians. Their definition, which is best expressed in the particle-position representation of the wave function, involves a novel type of boundary condition on the wave function, which we call an interior-boundary condition (IBC). The relevant configuration space is one of a variable number of particles, and the relevant boundary consists of the configurations with two or more particles at the same location. The IBC relates the value (or derivative) of the wave function at a boundary point to the value of the wave function at an interior point (here, in a sector of configuration space corresponding to a lesser number of particles).
  • This work contains a proof of a non-trivial explicit quantitative bound in the eigenvalue aspect for the sup-norm of a SL(3,Z) Hecke-Maass cusp form restricted to a compact set.
  • A C*-dynamical system is said to have the ideal separation property if every ideal in the corresponding crossed product arises from an invariant ideal in the C*-algebra. In this paper we characterize this property for unital C*-dynamical systems over discrete groups. To every C*-dynamical system we associate a "twisted" partial C*-dynamical system that encodes much of the structure of the action. This system can often be "untwisted," for example when the algebra is commutative, or when the algebra is prime and a certain specific subgroup has vanishing Mackey obstruction. In this case, we obtain relatively simple necessary and sufficient conditions for the ideal separation property. A key idea is a notion of noncommutative boundary for a C*-dynamical system that generalizes Furstenberg's notion of topological boundary for a group.
  • The Tur\'an function $ex(n,F)$ denotes the maximal number of edges in an $F$-free graph on $n$ vertices. We consider the function $h_F(n,q)$, the minimal number of copies of $F$ in a graph on $n$ vertices with $ex(n,F)+q$ edges. The value of $h_F(n,q)$ has been extensively studied when $F$ is bipartite or colour-critical. In this paper we investigate the simplest remaining graph $F$, namely, two triangles sharing a vertex, and establish the asymptotic value of $h_F(n,q)$ for $q=o(n^2)$.
  • We investigate the universal cover of a topological group that is not necessarily connected. Its existence as a topological group is governed by a Taylor cocycle, an obstruction in 3-cohomology. Alternatively, it always exists as a topological 2-group. The splitness of this 2-group is also governed by an obstruction in 3-cohomology, a Sinh cocycle. We give explicit formulas for both obstructions and show that they are inverse of each other.
  • Semidefinite programs (SDPs) -- some of the most useful and versatile optimization problems of the last few decades -- are often pathological: the optimal values of the primal and dual problems may differ and may not be attained. Such SDPs are both theoretically interesting and often impossible to solve; yet, the pathological SDPs in the literature look strikingly similar. Based on our recent work \cite{Pataki:17} we characterize pathological semidefinite systems by certain {\em excluded matrices}, which are easy to spot in all published examples. Our main tool is a normal (canonical) form of semidefinite systems, which makes their pathological behavior easy to verify. The normal form is constructed in a surprisingly simple fashion, using mostly elementary row operations inherited from Gaussian elimination. The proofs are elementary and can be followed by a reader at the advanced undergraduate level. As a byproduct, we show how to transform any linear map acting on symmetric matrices into a normal form, which allows us to quickly check whether the image of the semidefinite cone under the map is closed. We can thus introduce readers to a fundamental issue in convex analysis: the linear image of a closed convex set may not be closed, and often simple conditions are available to verify the closedness, or lack of it.
  • Tensor hierarchies are algebraic objects that emerge in gauging procedures in supergravity models, and that present a very deep and intricate relationship with Leibniz (or Loday) algebras. In this paper, we show that one can canonically associate a tensor hierarchy to any Loday algebra. By formalizing the construction that is performed in supergravity, we build this tensor hierarchy explicitly. We show that this tensor hierarchy can be canonically equipped with a differential graded Lie algebra structure that coincides with the one that is found in supergravity theories.
  • In the genomic era, the identification of gene signatures associated with disease is of significant interest. Such signatures are often used to predict clinical outcomes in new patients and aid clinical decision-making. However, recent studies have shown that gene signatures are often not replicable. This occurrence has practical implications regarding the generalizability and clinical applicability of such signatures. To improve replicability, we introduce a novel approach to select gene signatures from multiple datasets whose effects are consistently non-zero and account for between-study heterogeneity. We build our model upon some rank-based quantities, facilitating integration over different genomic datasets. A high dimensional penalized Generalized Linear Mixed Model (pGLMM) is used to select gene signatures and address data heterogeneity. We compare our method to some commonly used strategies that select gene signatures ignoring between-study heterogeneity. We provide asymptotic results justifying the performance of our method and demonstrate its advantage in the presence of heterogeneity through thorough simulation studies. Lastly, we motivate our method through a case study subtyping pancreatic cancer patients from four gene expression studies.
  • The neural network is a powerful computing framework that has been exploited by biological evolution and by humans for solving diverse problems. Although the computational capabilities of neural networks are determined by their structure, the current understanding of the relationships between a neural network's architecture and function is still primitive. Here we reveal that neural network's modular architecture plays a vital role in determining the neural dynamics and memory performance of the network of threshold neurons. In particular, we demonstrate that there exists an optimal modularity for memory performance, where a balance between local cohesion and global connectivity is established, allowing optimally modular networks to remember longer. Our results suggest that insights from dynamical analysis of neural networks and information spreading processes can be leveraged to better design neural networks and may shed light on the brain's modular organization.
  • We propose a general framework for nonasymptotic covariance matrix estimation making use of concentration inequality-based confidence sets. We specify this framework for the estimation of large sparse covariance matrices through incorporation of past thresholding estimators with key emphasis on support recovery. This technique goes beyond past results for thresholding estimators by allowing for a wide range of distributional assumptions beyond merely sub-Gaussian tails. This methodology can furthermore be adapted to a wide range of other estimators and settings. The usage of nonasymptotic dimension-free confidence sets yields good theoretical performance. Through extensive simulations, it is demonstrated to have superior performance when compared with other such methods. In the context of support recovery, we are able to specify a false positive rate and optimize to maximize the true recoveries.
  • Recently representation theory has been used to provide atomic decompositions for a large collection of classical Banach spaces. In this paper we extend the techniques to also include projective representations. As our main application we obtain atomic decompositions of Bergman spaces on the unit ball through the holomorphic discrete series for the group of isometries of the ball.
  • This article proves that an irreducible subfactor planar algebra with a distributive biprojection lattice admits a minimal 2-box projection generating the identity biprojection. It is a generalization (conjectured in 2013) of a theorem of Oystein Ore on distributive intervals of finite groups (1938), and a corollary of a natural subfactor extension of a conjecture of Kenneth S. Brown in algebraic combinatorics (2000). We deduce a link between combinatorics and representations in finite group theory.