• The commonly used isotropic baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) equation is an approximation derived from empirical and geometric arguments, and the equivalent anisotropic BAO equations were written down by analogy. Using fit-lines to CMB compatible solutions, {\Omega}_{m} and H_{0} values have been derived for BAO studies without recourse to those equations, and have been applied for their appraisal. The isotropic expression becomes problematic at precision levels of ~1 percent or better, and at high redshift values of z = / >1. Most revealing, the anisotropic equations, D_{M}(z)/D_{M,fid}(z)={\alpha}_{\perp}r_{d}/r_{d,fid}, and D_{H}(z)/D_{H,fid}(z)={\alpha}_{\parallel}r_{d}/r_{d,fid}, are invalid when {\alpha} ~ 1, since under that condition, D_{M}(z)/D_{M,fid}(z)=D_{H}(z)/D_{H,fid}(z)=r_{d}/r_{d,fid} ~ 1, and neither equation can be satisfied with anisotropic data. (The ratios are respectively, the angular distance, the inverse Hubble parameter, and the comoving acoustic horizon, each divided by its fiducial value). {\alpha} can be driven towards unity for any data set, e.g., by applying the derived {\Omega}_{m}, H_{0} pair as the core of a second iteration fiducial parameter-set. Thus, the anisotropic equations are untenable. Dissociated from the BAO equations, we have extracted weighted mean values of {\Omega}_{mw}=0.299+/-0.011 and H_{0w}=68.6+/-0.7 km s-1 Mpc-1 for eight uncorrelated BAO data sets.
  • Angular momentum plays very important roles in the formation of PBHs in the matter-dominated phase if it lasts sufficiently long. In fact, most collapsing masses are bounced back due to centrifugal force, since angular momentum significantly grows before collapse. As a consequence, most of the formed PBHs are rapidly rotating near the extreme value $a_{*}=1$, where $a_{*}$ is the nondimensional Kerr parameter at their formation. The smaller the density fluctuation $\sigma_{H}$ at horizon entry is, the stronger the tendency towards the extreme rotation. Combining the effect of angular momentum with that of anisotropy, we estimate the black hole production rate. We find that the production rate suffers from suppression dominantly due to angular momentum for a smaller value of $\sigma_{H}$, while due to anisotrpopy for a larger value of $\sigma_{H}$. We argue that matter domination significantly enhances the production of PBHs despite the suppression. If the matter-dominated phase does not last so long, the effect of the finite duration significantly suppresses PBH formation and weakens the tendency towards large spins. (abridged)
  • The statistical properties of galaxy clusters can only be used for cosmological purposes if observational effects related to cluster detection are accurately characterized. These effects include the selection function associated to cluster finder algorithms and survey strategy. The importance of the selection becomes apparent when different cluster finders are applied to the same galaxy catalog, producing different cluster samples. We consider parametrized functional forms for the observable-mass relation, its scatter as well as the completeness and purity of cluster samples, and study how prior knowledge on these function parameters affects dark energy constraints derived from cluster statistics. Under the assumption that completeness and purity reach 50 % at masses around 10^{13.5} Msun/h, we find that self-calibration of selection parameters in current and upcoming cluster surveys is possible, while still allowing for competitive dark energy constraints. We consider a fiducial survey with specifications similar to those of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) with 5000 deg^2, maximum redshift of zmax ~ 1.0 and threshold observed mass M_{th} ~ 10^{13.8} Msun/h, such that completeness and purity ~ 60 % - 80 % at masses around M_{th}. Perfect knowledge of all selection parameters allows for constraining a constant dark energy equation of state to sigma(w)=0.033. Employing a joint fit including self-calibration of the effective selection degrades constraints to sigma(w)=0.046. External calibrations at the level of 1 % in the parameters of the observable-mass relation and completeness/purity functions are necessary to improve the joint constraints to sigma(w)=0.041. In the lack of knowledge of selection parameters, future experiments probing larger areas and greater depths suffer from stronger relative degradations on dark energy constraints compared to current surveys.
  • We present in detail the convolutional neural network used in our previous work to detect cosmic strings in cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropy maps. By training this neural network on numerically generated CMB temperature maps, with and without cosmic strings, the network can produce prediction maps that locate the position of the cosmic strings and provide a probabilistic estimate of the value of the string tension $G\mu$. Supplying noiseless simulations of CMB maps with arcmin resolution to the network resulted in the accurate determination both of string locations and string tension for sky maps having strings with string tension as low as $G\mu=5\times10^{-9}$. The code is publicly available online. Though we trained the network with a long straight string toy model, we show the network performs well with realistic Nambu-Goto simulations.
  • In quantum gravity perturbation theory in Newton's constant G is known to be badly divergent, and as a result not very useful. Nevertheless some of the most interesting phenomena in physics are often associated with non-analytic behavior in the coupling constant and the existence of nontrivial quantum condensates. It is therefore possible that pathologies encountered in the case of gravity are more likely the result of inadequate analytical treatment, and not necessarily a reflection of some intrinsic insurmountable problem. The nonperturbative treatment of quantum gravity via the Regge-Wheeler lattice path integral formulation reveals the existence of a new phase involving a nontrivial gravitational vacuum condensate, and a new set of scaling exponents characterizing both the running of G and the long-distance behavior of invariant correlation functions. The appearance of such a gravitational condensate is viewed as analogous to the (equally nonperturbative) gluon and chiral condensates known to describe the physical vacuum of QCD. The resulting quantum theory of gravity is highly constrained, and its physical predictions are found to depend only on one adjustable parameter, a genuinely nonperturbative scale xi in many ways analogous to the scaling violation parameter Lambda MSbar of QCD. Recent results point to significant deviations from classical gravity on distance scales approaching the effective infrared cutoff set by the observed cosmological constant. Such subtle quantum effects are expected to be initially small on current cosmological scales, but could become detectable in future high precision satellite experiments.
  • The standard $\Lambda$CDM model can be mimicked at the background and perturbative levels (linear and non-linear) by a class of gravitationally induced particle production cosmology dubbed CCDM cosmology. However, the radiation component in the CCDM model follows a slightly different temperature-redshift $T(z)$-law which depends on an extra parameter, $\nu_r$, describing the subdominant photon production rate. Here we perform a statistical analysis based on a compilation of 36 recent measurements of $T(z)$ at low and intermediate redshifts. The likelihood of the production rate in CCDM cosmologies is constrained by $\nu_r = 0.024^{+0.026}_{-0.024}$ ($1\sigma$ confidence level), thereby showing that $\Lambda$CDM ($\nu_r=0$) is still compatible with the adopted data sample. Although being hardly differentiated in the dynamic sector (cosmic history and matter fluctuations), the so-called thermal sector (temperature law, abundances of thermal relics and CMB power spectrum) offers a clear possibility for crucial tests confronting $\Lambda$CDM and CCDM cosmologies.
  • We describe a new method for reducing the shape noise in weak lensing measurements by an order of magnitude. Our method relies on spectroscopic measurements of disk galaxy rotation and makes use of the Tully-Fisher relation in order to control for the intrinsic orientations of galaxy disks. For this new proposed method, so-called Kinematic Lensing (KL), the shape noise ceases to be an important source of statistical error. We use the CosmoLike software package to simulate likelihood analyses for two Kinematic Lensing survey concepts (roughly similar in scale to Dark Energy Survey Task Force Stage III and Stage IV missions) and compare their constraining power to a cosmic shear survey from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). Our forecasts in seven-dimensional cosmological parameter space include statistical uncertainties resulting from shape noise, cosmic variance, halo sample variance, and higher-order moments of the density field. We marginalize over systematic uncertainties arising from photometric redshift errors and shear calibration biases considering both optimistic and conservative assumptions about LSST systematic errors. We find that even the KL-Stage III is highly competitive with the optimistic LSST scenario, while evading the most important sources of theoretical and observational systematic error inherent in traditional weak lensing techniques. Furthermore, the KL technique enables a narrow-bin cosmic shear tomography approach to tightly constrain time-dependent signatures in the dark energy phenomenon.
  • We explore the possibility of detecting entangled photon pairs from cosmic microwave background or other cosmological sources coming from two patches of the sky. The measurements use two detectors with different photon polarizer directions. When two photon sources are separated by a large angle relative to the earth, such that each detector has only one photon source in its field of view, a null test of unentangled photons can be performed. The deviation from this unentangled background is, in principle, the signature of photon entanglement. To confirm whether the deviation is consistent with entangled photons, we derive a photon polarization correlation to compare with, similar to that in a Bell inequality measurement. However, since photon coincidence measurement cannot be used to discriminate unentangled cosmic photons, it is unlikely that the correlation expectation value alone can violate Bell inequality to provide the signature for entanglement.
  • We investigate anisotropic cosmological solutions of the theory with non-minimal couplings between electromagnetic fields and gravity in $Y(R) F^2$ form. After we derive the field equations by the variational principle, we look for spatially flat cosmological solutions with magnetic fields or electric fields. Then we give exact anisotropic solutions by assuming the hyperbolic expansion functions. We observe that the solutions approach to the isotropic case in late-times.
  • Observations of galaxies and galaxy clusters in the local universe can account for only $\sim\,10\%$ of the total baryon content. Cosmological simulations predict that the `missing baryons' are spread throughout filamentary structures in the cosmic web, forming a low-density gas with temperatures of $10^5-10^7\,\!$K. We search for this warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM) by stacking the Planck Compton $y$-parameter map of the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect for 1,002,334 pairs of CMASS galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We model the contribution from the galaxy halo pairs assuming spherical symmetry, finding a residual tSZ signal at the $2.9\mbox{$\sigma$}$ level from a stacked filament of length $10.5\,h^{-1}\,\rm Mpc$ with a Compton parameter magnitude $y=(0.6\pm0.2)\times10^{-8}$. We consider possible sources of contamination and conclude that bound gas in haloes may contribute only up to $20\%$ of the measured filamentary signal. To estimate the filament gas properties we measure the gravitational lensing signal for the same sample of galaxy pairs; in combination with the tSZ signal, this yields an inferred gas density of $\rho_{\rm b}=(5.5\pm 2.9)\times\bar{\rho_{\rm b}}$ with a temperature $T=(2.7\pm 1.7) \times 10^6\,$K. This result is consistent with the predicted WHIM properties, and overall the filamentary gas can account for $ 11\pm 7\%$ of the total baryon content of the Universe. We also see evidence that the gas filament extends beyond the galaxy pair. Averaging over this longer baseline boosts the significance of the tSZ signal and increases the associated baryon content to $28\pm 12\%$ of the global value.
  • We search the Planck data for a thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) signal due to gas filaments between pairs of Luminous Red Galaxies (LRG's) taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12 (SDSS/DR12). We identify $\sim$260,000 LRG pairs in the DR12 catalog that lie within 6-10 $h^{-1} \mathrm{Mpc}$ of each other in tangential direction and within 6 $h^{-1} \mathrm{Mpc}$ in radial direction. We stack pairs by rotating and scaling the angular positions of each LRG so they lie on a common reference frame, then we subtract a circularly symmetric halo from each member of the pair to search for a residual signal between the pair members. We find a statistically significant (5.3$\sigma$) signal between LRG pairs in the stacked data with a magnitude $\Delta y = (1.31 \pm 0.25) \times 10^{-8}$. The uncertainty is estimated from two Monte Carlo null tests which also establish the reliability of our analysis. Assuming a simple, isothermal, cylindrical filament model of electron over-density with a radial density profile proportional to $r_c/r$ (as determined from simulations), where $r$ is the perpendicular distance from the cylinder axis and $r_c$ is the core radius of the density profile, we constrain the product of over-density and filament temperature to be $\delta_c \times (T_{\rm e}/10^7 \, {\rm K}) \times (r_c/0.5h^{-1} \, {\rm Mpc}) = 2.7 \pm 0.5$. To our knowledge, this is the first detection of filamentary gas at over-densities typical of cosmological large-scale structure. We compare our result to the BAHAMAS suite of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations (McCarthy et al. 2017) and find a slightly lower, but marginally consistent Comptonization excess, $\Delta y = (0.84 \pm 0.24) \times 10^{-8}$.
  • DES Collaboration: T. M. C. Abbott, F. B. Abdalla, A. Alarcon, J. Aleksić, S. Allam, S. Allen, A. Amara, J. Annis, J. Asorey, S. Avila, D. Bacon, E. Balbinot, M. Banerji, N. Banik, W. Barkhouse, M. Baumer, E. Baxter, K. Bechtol, M. R. Becker, A. Benoit-Lévy, B. A. Benson, G. M. Bernstein, E. Bertin, J. Blazek, S. L. Bridle, D. Brooks, D. Brout, E. Buckley-Geer, D. L. Burke, M. T. Busha, D. Capozzi, A. Carnero Rosell, M. Carrasco Kind, J. Carretero, F. J. Castander, R. Cawthon, C. Chang, N. Chen, M. Childress, A. Choi, C. Conselice, R. Crittenden, M. Crocce, C. E. Cunha, C. B. D'Andrea, L. N. da Costa, R. Das, T. M. Davis, C. Davis, J. De Vicente, D. L. DePoy, J. DeRose, S. Desai, H. T. Diehl, J. P. Dietrich, S. Dodelson, P. Doel, A. Drlica-Wagner, T. F. Eifler, A. E. Elliott, F. Elsner, J. Elvin-Poole, J. Estrada, A. E. Evrard, Y. Fang, E. Fernandez, A. Ferté, D. A. Finley, B. Flaugher, P. Fosalba, O. Friedrich, J. Frieman, J. García-Bellido, M. Garcia-Fernandez, M. Gatti, E. Gaztanaga, D. W. Gerdes, T. Giannantonio, M. S. S. Gill, K. Glazebrook, D. A. Goldstein, D. Gruen, R. A. Gruendl, J. Gschwend, G. Gutierrez, S. Hamilton, W. G. Hartley, S. R. Hinton, K. Honscheid, B. Hoyle, D. Huterer, B. Jain, D. J. James, M. Jarvis, T. Jeltema, M. D. Johnson, M. W. G. Johnson, T. Kacprzak, S. Kent, A. G. Kim, A. King, D. Kirk, N. Kokron, A. Kovacs, E. Krause, C. Krawiec, A. Kremin, K. Kuehn, S. Kuhlmann, N. Kuropatkin, F. Lacasa, O. Lahav, T. S. Li, A. R. Liddle, C. Lidman, M. Lima, H. Lin, N. MacCrann, M. A. G. Maia, M. Makler, M. Manera, M. March, J. L. Marshall, P. Martini, R. G. McMahon, P. Melchior, F. Menanteau, R. Miquel, V. Miranda, D. Mudd, J. Muir, A. Möller, E. Neilsen, R. C. Nichol, B. Nord, P. Nugent, R. L. C. Ogando, A. Palmese, J. Peacock, H.V. Peiris, J. Peoples, W. J. Percival, D. Petravick, A. A. Plazas, A. Porredon, J. Prat, A. Pujol, M. M. Rau, A. Refregier, P. M. Ricker, N. Roe, R. P. Rollins, A. K. Romer, A. Roodman, R. Rosenfeld, A. J. Ross, E. Rozo, E. S. Rykoff, M. Sako, A. I. Salvador, S. Samuroff, C. Sánchez, E. Sanchez, B. Santiago, V. Scarpine, R. Schindler, D. Scolnic, L. F. Secco, S. Serrano, I. Sevilla-Noarbe, E. Sheldon, R. C. Smith, M. Smith, J. Smith, M. Soares-Santos, F. Sobreira, E. Suchyta, G. Tarle, D. Thomas, M. A. Troxel, D. L. Tucker, B. E. Tucker, S. A. Uddin, T. N. Varga, P. Vielzeuf, V. Vikram, A. K. Vivas, A. R. Walker, M. Wang, R. H. Wechsler, J. Weller, W. Wester, R. C. Wolf, B. Yanny, F. Yuan, A. Zenteno, B. Zhang, Y. Zhang, J. Zuntz
    March 1, 2019 astro-ph.CO
    We present cosmological results from a combined analysis of galaxy clustering and weak gravitational lensing, using 1321 deg$^2$ of $griz$ imaging data from the first year of the Dark Energy Survey (DES Y1). We combine three two-point functions: (i) the cosmic shear correlation function of 26 million source galaxies in four redshift bins, (ii) the galaxy angular autocorrelation function of 650,000 luminous red galaxies in five redshift bins, and (iii) the galaxy-shear cross-correlation of luminous red galaxy positions and source galaxy shears. To demonstrate the robustness of these results, we use independent pairs of galaxy shape, photometric redshift estimation and validation, and likelihood analysis pipelines. To prevent confirmation bias, the bulk of the analysis was carried out while blind to the true results; we describe an extensive suite of systematics checks performed and passed during this blinded phase. The data are modeled in flat $\Lambda$CDM and $w$CDM cosmologies, marginalizing over 20 nuisance parameters, varying 6 (for $\Lambda$CDM) or 7 (for $w$CDM) cosmological parameters including the neutrino mass density and including the 457 $\times$ 457 element analytic covariance matrix. We find consistent cosmological results from these three two-point functions, and from their combination obtain $S_8 \equiv \sigma_8 (\Omega_m/0.3)^{0.5} = 0.783^{+0.021}_{-0.025}$ and $\Omega_m = 0.264^{+0.032}_{-0.019}$ for $\Lambda$CDM for $w$CDM, we find $S_8 = 0.794^{+0.029}_{-0.027}$, $\Omega_m = 0.279^{+0.043}_{-0.022}$, and $w=-0.80^{+0.20}_{-0.22}$ at 68% CL. The precision of these DES Y1 results rivals that from the Planck cosmic microwave background measurements, allowing a comparison of structure in the very early and late Universe on equal terms. Although the DES Y1 best-fit values for $S_8$ and $\Omega_m$ are lower than the central values from Planck ...
  • Looking deep into the space in search for truth has been a long time goal of humanity. With the development of new technologies and observational techniques, we are now well equipped to see objects billions of light years away from us. In this study we are going to discuss some of the challenges radio astronomers face while observing radio continuum sources. We will discuss issues related to rms noise, confusion, position accuracy, shot noise and how these issues can affect observation results, data analysis and the science goals we are trying to achieve. We will mainly focus on the Evolutionary Map of the Universe (EMU-ASKAP) sky survey, EMU Early science survey and Westerbork Observations of the Deep APERTIF Northern sky (WODAN), for our study. The study will also be useful for future surveys like with possible continuum surveys through MeerKAT (e.g. MIGHTEE) and SKA-1. The late time Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect detection is one of the major areas of research related to dark energy cosmology. We will particularly discuss how technical, data analysis and mapping issues, affect galaxy over/under density dependent science goals like the detection of the late time Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect through wide field radio continuum surveys.
  • We consider a homogeneous and isotropic Universe, described by the minisuperspace Lagrangian with the scale factor as a generalized coordinate. We show that the energy of a closed Universe is zero. We apply the uncertainty principle to this Lagrangian and propose that the quantum uncertainty of the scale factor causes the primordial fluctuations of the matter density. We use the dynamics of the early Universe in the Einstein$-$Cartan theory of gravity with spin and torsion, which eliminates the big-bang singularity and replaces it with a nonsingular bounce. Quantum particle production in highly curved spacetime generates a finite period of cosmic inflation that is consistent with the Planck satellite data. From the inflated primordial fluctuations, we determine the magnitude of the temperature fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background, as a function of the numbers of the thermal degrees of freedom of elementary particles and the particle production coefficient, which is the only unknown parameter.
  • It has been suggested that primordial black holes (PBHs) of roughly 30 solar masses could make up the dark matter and if so, might account for the recent detections by LIGO involving binary black holes in this mass range. It has also been argued that the super-massive black holes (SMBHs) that reside at galactic centers may be surrounded by extremely-dense dark-matter (DM) spikes. Here we show that the rate for PBH mergers in these spikes may well exceed the merger rate considered before in galactic dark-matter halos, depending on the magnitudes of two competing effects on the DM spikes: depletion of PBHs due to relaxation and replenishment due to PBHs in loss cone. This may provide a plausible explanation for the current rate of detection of mergers of 30-solar-mass black holes, even if PBHs make up a subdominant contribution to the dark matter. The gravitational-wave signals from such events will always originate in galactic centers, as opposed to those from halos, which are expected to have little correlation with luminous-galaxy positions.
  • The hypothesis of the self-induced collapse of the inflaton wave function was introduced as a candidate for the physical process responsible for the emergence of inhomogeneity and anisotropy at all scales. In particular, we consider different proposal for the precise form of the dynamics of the inflaton wave function: i) the GRW-type collapse schemes proposals based on spontaneous individual collapses which generate non-vanishing expectation values of various physical quantities taken as ansatz modifications of the standard inflationary scenario; ii) the proposal based on a Continuous Spontaneous Localization (CSL) type modification of the Schr\"odinger evolution of the inflaton wave function, based on a natural choice of collapse operator. We perform a systematic analysis within the semi-classical gravity approximation, of the standing of those models considering a full quasi-de sitter expansion scenario. We note that the predictions for the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature and polarization spectrum differ slightly from those of the standard cosmological model. We also analyse these proposals with a Bayesian model comparison using recent CMB and Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) data. Our results show a moderate preference of the joint CMB and BAO data for one of the studied collapse schemes model over the $\Lambda$CDM one, while there is no preference when only CMB data are considered. Additionally, analysis using CMB data provide the same Bayesian evidence for both the CSL and standard models, i.e. the data have not preference between the simplicity of the LCDM model and the complexity of the collapse scenario.
  • We study gravitational-wave production from bubble dynamics (bubble collisions and sound waves) during a cosmic first-order phase transition with an analytic approach. We first propose modeling the system with the thin-wall approximation but without the envelope approximation often adopted in the literature, in order to take bubble propagation after collisions into account. The bubble walls in our setup are considered as modeling the scalar field configuration and/or the bulk motion of the fluid. We next write down analytic expressions for the gravitational-wave spectrum, and evaluate them with numerical methods. It is found that, in the long-lasting limit of the collided bubble walls, the spectrum grows from $\propto f^3$ to $\propto f^1$ in low frequencies, showing a significant enhancement compared to the one with the envelope approximation. It is also found that the spectrum saturates in the same limit, indicating a decrease in the correlation of the energy-momentum tensor at late times. We also discuss the implications of our results to gravitational-wave production both from bubble collisions (scalar dynamics) and sound waves (fluid dynamics).
  • Tensions between cosmic microwave background observations and the growth of the large-scale structure inferred from late-time probes pose a serious challenge to the concordance $\Lambda$CDM cosmological model. State-of-the-art data from the Planck satellite predicts a higher rate of structure growth than what preferred by low-redshift observables. Such tension has hitherto eluded conclusive explanations in terms of straightforward modifications to $\Lambda$CDM, e.g. the inclusion of massive neutrinos or a dynamical dark energy component. Here, we investigate models of 'quartessence' -- a single dark component mimicking both dark matter and dark energy -- whose non-vanishing sound speed inhibits structure growth at late times on scales smaller than its corresponding Jeans' length. In principle, this could reconcile high- and low-redshift observations. We put this hypothesis to test against temperature and polarisation spectra from the latest Planck release, SDSS DR12 measurements of baryon acoustic oscillations and redshift-space distortions, and cosmic shear correlation functions from KiDS. This the first time that any specific model of quartessence is applied to actual data. We show that, if we naively apply $\Lambda$CDM nonlinear prescription to quartessence, the combined data sets allow for tight constraints on the model parameters. Apparently, quartessence alleviates the tension between the total matter fraction and late-time structure clustering, although in fact the tension is transferred from the latter to the quartessence sound speed parameter. However, we found that this strongly depends upon information from nonlinear scales. Indeed, if we relax this assumption, quartessence models appear still viable. For this reason, we argue that the nonlinear behaviour of quartessence deserves further investigation and may lead to a deeper understanding of the physics of the dark Universe.
  • Both multi-streaming (random motion) and bulk motion cause the Finger-of-God (FoG) effect in redshift space distortion (RSD). We apply a direct measurement of the multi-streaming effect in RSD from simulations, proving that it induces an additional, non-negligible FoG damping to the redshift space density power spectrum. We show that, including the multi-streaming effect, the RSD modelling is significantly improved. We also provide a theoretical explanation based on halo model for the measured effect, including a fitting formula with one to two free parameters. The improved understanding of FoG helps break the $f\sigma_8-\sigma_v$ degeneracy in RSD cosmology, and has the potential of significantly improving cosmological constraints.
  • Radiation in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray holds clues to the location of the missing baryons, the energetics in stellar feedback processes, and the cosmic enrichment history. Additionally, EUV and soft X-ray photons help determine the ionization state of most intergalactic and circumgalactic metals, shaping the rate at which cosmic gas cools. Unfortunately, this band is extremely difficult to probe observationally due to absorption from the Galaxy. In this paper, we model the contributions of various sources to the cosmic EUV and soft X-ray backgrounds. We bracket the contribution from (1) quasars, (2) X-ray binaries, (3) hot interstellar gas, (4) circumgalactic gas, (5) virialized gas, and (6) supersoft sources, developing models that extrapolate into these bands using both empirical and theoretical inputs. While quasars are traditionally assumed to dominate these backgrounds, we discuss the substantial uncertainty in their contribution. Furthermore, we find that hot intrahalo gases likely emit an O(1) fraction of this radiation at low redshifts, and that interstellar and circumgalactic emission potentially contribute tens of percent to these backgrounds at all redshifts. We estimate that uncertainties in the angular-averaged background intensity impact the ionization corrections for common circumgalactic and intergalactic metal absorption lines by ~0.3-1 dex, and we show that local emissions are comparable to the cosmic background only at r_prox = 10-100 kpc from Milky Way-like galaxies.
  • In the following work, we compute the positron production from branon dark matter annihilations in order to constrain extra-dimensional theories. By having assumed that the positron fraction measured by AMS-02 is well explained just with astrophysical sources, exclusion diagrams for the branon mass and the tension of the brane, the two parameters characterising the branon phenomenology become possible. Our analysis has been performed for a minimal and a medium diffusion model in one extra dimension for both pseudo-isothermal and Navarro Frenck White dark matter haloes. Our constraints in the dark matter mass candidate range between 200 GeV and 100 TeV. Combined with previous cosmological analyses and experimental data in colliders, it allows us to set bounds on the parameter space of branons. In particular, we have discarded regions in the mass-tension diagram up to a branon mass of 28 TeV for the pseudo-Isothermal prole and minimal diffusion, and 63 TeV for the Navarro-Frenck-White profile and medium diffusion.
  • We propose a new method to use the kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich for measuring the baryon fraction in cluster of galaxies. In this proposal we need a configuration in which a supernova Type Ia resides in a brightest cluster galaxy of intermediate redshift clusters. We show this supernova Type Ia can be used to measure the bulk velocity of a galaxy cluster. We assert that the redshift range of $0.4<z<0.6$ is suitable for this proposal. The main contribution to the deviation of standard candles distance modulus from cosmological background prediction in this redshift range comes from peculiar velocity of the host galaxy and gravitational lensing. In this work we argue that by the knowledge of the bulk flow of the galaxy cluster and the cosmic microwave background photons temperature change due to kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich, we can constrain the baryon fraction of galaxy cluster. The probability of this configuration for clusters is obtained. We estimate in a conservative parameter estimation the large synoptic survey telescope can find spectroscopically followed $\sim 4500$ galaxy clusters with a bright cluster galaxy which hosts a type Ia Supernova each year. Finally, we show the improving of the distance modulus measurement is the key improvement in future surveys which will be crucial to detect the baryon fraction of cluster with the proposed method.
  • With the growing consensus on simple power law inflation models not being favored by the PLANCK observation, dynamics for the non-standard form of the inflaton potential gain significant interest in the recent past. In this paper, we analyze in great detail classes of phenomenologically motivated inflationary models with non-polynomial potential which are the generalization of the potential introduced in \cite{mhiggs}. After the end of inflation, inflaton field will coherently oscillate around its minimum. Depending upon the initial amplitude of the oscillation and coupling parameters standard parametric resonance phenomena will occur. Therefore, we will study how the inflationary model parameters play an important role in understanding the resonant structure of our model under study. Subsequently, the universe will go through the perturbative reheating phase. However, without any specific model consideration, we further study the constraints on our models based on model independent reheating constraint analysis.
  • Wave Dark Matter (WaveDM) has recently gained attention as a viable candidate to account for the dark matter content of the Universe. In this paper we explore the extent to which dark matter halos in this model, and under what conditions, are able to reproduce strong lensing systems. First, we analytically explore the lensing properties of the model -- finding that a pure WaveDM density profile, a soliton profile, produces a weaker lensing effect than other similar cored profiles. Then we analyze models with a soliton embedded in an NFW profile, as has been found in numerical simulations of structure formation. We use a benchmark model with a boson mass of $m_a=10^{-22}{\rm eV}$, for which we see that there is a bi-modality in the contribution of the external NFW part of the profile, and actually some of the free parameters associated with it are not well constrained. We find that for configurations with boson masses $10^{-23}$ -- $10^{-22}{\rm eV}$, a range of masses preferred by dwarf galaxy kinematics, the soliton profile alone can fit the data but its size is incompatible with the luminous extent of the lens galaxies. Likewise, boson masses of the order of $10^{-21}{\rm eV}$, which would be consistent with Lyman-$\alpha$ constraints and consist of more compact soliton configurations, necessarily require the NFW part in order to reproduce the observed Einstein radii. We then conclude that lens systems impose a conservative lower bound $m_a > 10^{-24}$ and that the NFW envelope around the soliton must be present to satisfy the observational requirements.
  • Gravitational lensing of the CMB is a valuable cosmological signal that correlates to tracers of large-scale structure and acts as a important source of confusion for primordial $B$-mode polarization. State-of-the-art lensing reconstruction analyses use quadratic estimators, which are easily applicable to data. However, these estimators are known to be suboptimal, in particular for polarization, and large improvements are expected to be possible for high signal-to-noise polarization experiments. We develop a method and numerical code, $\rm{LensIt}$, that is able to find efficiently the most probable lensing map, introducing no significant approximations to the lensed CMB likelihood, and applicable to beamed and masked data with inhomogeneous noise. It works by iteratively reconstructing the primordial unlensed CMB using a deflection estimate and its inverse, and removing residual lensing from these maps with quadratic estimator techniques. Roughly linear computational cost is maintained due to fast convergence of iterative searches, combined with the local nature of lensing. The method achieves the maximal improvement in signal to noise expected from analytical considerations on the unmasked parts of the sky. Delensing with this optimal map leads to forecast tensor-to-scalar ratio parameter errors improved by a factor $\simeq 2 $ compared to the quadratic estimator in a CMB stage IV configuration.