• We propose a new way of defining Hamiltonians for quantum field theories without any renormalization procedure. The resulting Hamiltonians, called IBC Hamiltonians, are mathematically well-defined (and in particular, ultraviolet finite) without an ultraviolet cut-off such as smearing out the particles over a nonzero radius; rather, the particles are assigned radius zero. These Hamiltonians agree with those obtained through renormalization whenever both are known to exist. We describe explicit examples of IBC Hamiltonians. Their definition, which is best expressed in the particle-position representation of the wave function, involves a novel type of boundary condition on the wave function, which we call an interior-boundary condition (IBC). The relevant configuration space is one of a variable number of particles, and the relevant boundary consists of the configurations with two or more particles at the same location. The IBC relates the value (or derivative) of the wave function at a boundary point to the value of the wave function at an interior point (here, in a sector of configuration space corresponding to a lesser number of particles).
  • We propose a novel ultrafast electronic switching device based on dual-graphene electron waveguides, in analogy to the optical dual-channel waveguide device. The design utilizes the principle of coherent quantum mechanical tunneling of Rabi oscillations between the two graphene electron waveguides. Based on a modified coupled mode theory, we construct a theoretical model to analyse the device characteristics, and predict that the swtiching speed is faster than 1 ps. Due to the long mean free path of electrons in graphene at room temperature, the proposed design avoids the limitation of low temperature operation required in the normal semiconductor quantum-well structure. The layout of the our design is similar to that of a standard CMOS transistor that should be readily fabricated with current state-of-art nanotechnology.
  • Device-independent security is the gold standard for quantum cryptography: not only is security based entirely on the laws of quantum mechanics, but it holds irrespective of any a priori assumptions on the quantum devices used in a protocol, making it particularly applicable in a quantum-wary environment. While the existence of device-independent protocols for tasks such as randomness expansion and quantum key distribution has recently been established, the underlying proofs of security remain very challenging, yield rather poor key rates, and demand very high-quality quantum devices, thus making them all but impossible to implement in practice. We introduce a technique for the analysis of device-independent cryptographic protocols. We provide a flexible protocol and give a security proof that provides quantitative bounds that are asymptotically tight, even in the presence of general quantum adversaries. At a high level our approach amounts to establishing a reduction to the scenario in which the untrusted device operates in an identical and independent way in each round of the protocol. This is achieved by leveraging the sequential nature of the protocol, and makes use of a newly developed tool, the "entropy accumulation theorem" of Dupuis et al. As concrete applications we give simple and modular security proofs for device-independent quantum key distribution and randomness expansion protocols based on the CHSH inequality. For both tasks we establish essentially optimal asymptotic key rates and noise tolerance. In view of recent experimental progress, which has culminated in loophole-free Bell tests, it is likely that these protocols can be practically implemented in the near future.
  • The phenomenon of many-body localised (MBL) systems has attracted significant interest in recent years, for its intriguing implications from a perspective of both condensed-matter and statistical physics: they are insulators even at non-zero temperature and fail to thermalise, violating expectations from quantum statistical mechanics. What is more, recent seminal experimental developments with ultra-cold atoms in optical lattices constituting analog quantum simulators have pushed many-body localised systems into the realm of physical systems that can be measured with high accuracy. In this work, we introduce experimentally accessible witnesses that directly probe distinct features of MBL, distinguishing it from its Anderson counterpart. We insist on building our toolbox from techniques available in the laboratory, including on-site addressing, super-lattices, and time-of-flight measurements, identifying witnesses based on fluctuations, density-density correlators, densities, and entanglement. We build upon the theory of out of equilibrium quantum systems, in conjunction with tensor network and exact simulations, showing the effectiveness of the tools for realistic models.
  • Many wave phenomena are related to interactions. Considering once neglected interactions in some cases, states of large objects and Newton's idea about measurement, we attempt to modify some concepts and principles of non-relativistic quantum mechanics. Our modifications may help one to understand some typical quantum phenomena with near classical and intuitive ideas without changing past correct results, may mediate some contradictions logically, and then may partially perfect non-relativistic quantum mechanics. We also give a review of the argument between Einstein and Bohr about non-relativistic quantum mechanics simply based on interaction.
  • We review a geometric approach to classification and examination of quantum correlations in composite systems. Since quantum information tasks are usually achieved by manipulating spin and alike systems or, in general, systems with a finite number of energy levels, classification problems are usually treated in frames of linear algebra. We proposed to shift the attention to a geometric description. Treating consistently quantum states as points of a projective space rather than as vectors in a Hilbert space we were able to apply powerful methods of differential, symplectic and algebraic geometry to attack the problem of equivalence of states with respect to the strength of correlations, or, in other words, to classify them from this point of view. Such classifications are interpreted as identification of states with `the same correlations properties' i.e. ones that can be used for the same information purposes, or, from yet another point of view, states that can be mutually transformed one to another by specific, experimentally accessible operations. It is clear that the latter characterization answers the fundamental question `what can be transformed into what \textit{via} available means?'. Exactly such an interpretations, i.e, in terms of mutual transformability can be clearly formulated in terms of actions of specific groups on the space of states and is the starting point for the proposed methods.
  • In this work, we extensively study the problem of broadcasting of entanglement. In the first part of the work, we reconceptualize the idea of state dependent quantum cloning machine, and in that process we introduce different types of state dependent cloners like static and dynamic state dependent cloners. We derive the conditions under which we can make these cloners independent of the input state. In the broadcasting part, as our resource initial state, we start with general two qubit state and consider specific examples like, non maximally entangled state (NME), Werner like state (WS), and Bell diagonal state (BDS). We apply both state dependent/ state independent cloners, both locally and non-locally, in each of these cases. Incidentally, we find several instances where state dependent cloners outperform state independent cloners in broadcasting. This work gives us a holistic view on the broadcasting of entanglement in various two qubit states, when we have an almost exhaustive sets of cloning machines in our arsenal
  • Blind quantum computing protocols enable a client, who can generate or measure single-qubit states, to delegate quantum computing to a remote quantum server protecting the client's privacy (i.e., input, output, and program). With current technologies, generations or measurements of single-qubit states are not too much burden for the client. In other words, secure delegated quantum computing is possible for "almost classical" clients. However, is it possible for a "completely classical" client? Here we consider a one-round perfectly-secure delegated quantum computing, and show that the protocol cannot satisfy both the correctness (i.e., the correct result is obtained when the server is honest) and the perfect blindness (i.e., the client's privacy is completely protected) simultaneously unless BQP is in NP. Since BQP is not believed to be in NP, the result suggests the impossibility of the one-round perfectly-secure delegated quantum computing.
  • Most of our current understanding of mechanisms of photosynthesis comes from spectroscopy. However, classical definition of radio-antenna can be extended to optical regime to discuss the function of light-harvesting antennae. Further to our previously proposed model of a loop antenna we provide several more physical explanations on considering the non-reciprocal properties of the light harvesters of bacteria. We explained the function of the non-heme iron at the reaction center, and presented reasons for each module of the light harvester being composed of one carotenoid, two short $\alpha$-helical polypeptides and three bacteriochlorophylls; we explained also the toroidal shape of the light harvester, the upper bound of the characteristic length of the light harvester, the functional role played by the long-lasting spectrometric signal observed, and the photon anti-bunching observed. Based on these analyses, two mechanisms might be used by radiation-durable bacteria, {\it Deinococcus radiodurans}; and the non-reciprocity of an archaeon, {\it Haloquadratum walsbyi}, are analyzed. The physical lessons involved are useful for designing artificial light harvesters, optical sensors, wireless power chargers, passive super-Planckian heat radiators, photocatalytic hydrogen generators, and radiation protective cloaks. In particular it can predict what kind of particles should be used to separate sunlight into a photovoltaically and thermally useful range to enhance the efficiency of solar cells.
  • The quantum Cheshire cat (QCC) thought experiment proposes that a quantum object's property (e.g polarisation, spin, etc.) can be separated from its physical body or disembodied. This conclusion arose from an argument that interprets a zero weak value of polarisation as no polarisation. We show that this argument is incomplete, as a zero weak value reading can also correspond to linear polarisation. Nevertheless, through a generalisation of the QCC, we complete their argument by explicitly excluding the possibility of linear polarisation as a consistent interpretation. We go further, and introduce the dual of the generalised QCC. The dual QCC exhibits an intriguing effect, where a horizontally-polarised interferometer with just one arm, can give rise to interference which is vertically-polarised. The interference appears to arise as the result of the phase difference between the physical arm and a phantom arm. This peculiar effect arises from the interplay between the pre-selected and post-selected states, which characterises weak values. The QCC has not yet been unambiguously experimentally demonstrated. The QCC dual offers a simpler alternative pathway to experimental realisation.
  • A simple method for transmitting quantum states within a quantum computer is via a quantum spin chain---that is, a path on $n$ vertices. Unweighted paths are of limited use, and so a natural generalization is to consider weighted paths; this has been further generalized to allow for loops (\emph{potentials} in the physics literature). We study the particularly important situation of perfect state transfer with respect to the corresponding adjacency matrix or Laplacian through the use of orthogonal polynomials. Low-dimensional examples are given in detail. Our main result is that PST with respect to the Laplacian matrix cannot occur for weighted paths on $n\geq 3$ vertices nor can it occur for certain symmetric weighted trees. The methods used lead us to a conjecture directly linking the rationality of the weights of weighted paths on $n>3$ vertices, with or without loops, with the capacity for PST between the end vertices with respect to the adjacency matrix.
  • Quantum light sources are characterized by their distinctive statistical distribution of photons. For example, single photons and correlated photon pairs exhibit antibunching and reduced variance in the number distribution that is impossible with classical light. Most common realizations of quantum light sources have relied on spontaneous parametric processes such as down-conversion (SPDC) and four-wave mixing (SFWM). These processes are mediated by vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. Therefore, by manipulating the electromagnetic mode structure, for example, using nanophotonic systems, one can engineer the spectrum of generated photons. However, such manipulations are susceptible to fabrication disorders which are ubiquitous in nanophotonic systems and lead to device-to-device variations in the spectrum of generated photons. Here, we demonstrate topologically robust mode engineering of the electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations and implement a nanophotonic quantum light source where the spectrum of generated photons is robust against fabrication disorders. Specifically, we use the topological edge states to achieve an enhanced and robust generation of correlated photon pairs using SFWM and show that they outperform their topologically-trivial counterparts. We demonstrate the non-classical nature of our source using conditional antibunching of photons which confirms that we have realized a robust source of heralded single photons. Such topological effects, which are unique to bosonic systems, could pave the way for the development of robust quantum photonic devices.
  • We present an operational and model-independent framework to investigate the concept of no-backwards-in-time signaling. We define no-backwards-in-time signaling conditions, closely related to the spatial no-signaling conditions. These allow for theoretical possibilities in which the future affects the past, nevertheless without signaling backwards in time. This is analogous to non-local but no-signaling spatial correlations. Furthermore, our results shed new light on situations with indefinite causal structure and their connection to quantum theory.
  • A quantum mechanics representation based on position ($\vec{r}$), linear momentum($\vec{p}$) and energy($E$) eigenvalues is presented here. A set of equations, explicitly independent on wave function, was derived relating these observables. In this view, a particle has a known trajectory and at any point on space there is a linear momentum associated. Trajectory here, can be viewed as if a measurement were taken continuously. This picture does not change current quantum mechanics interpretation, rather it comes as a new route of calculation. Also, wave function can be retrieved performing an integration in all space for linear momentum. Equations derived in this work, present a potential dependent on linear momentum originating what we call quantum force. A particle experiences a total force whose resultant is composed by classic and quantum force, evolving on time according to it. In terms of evaluation, a single particle could be described by a set of auxiliary particles named as wave particles(WP). They will start with a range of initial conditions and will collectively describe probabilistic aspects of quantum mechanics. We expect this route could be applied to many problems, such as multi-body systems.
  • Here we consider some well-known facts in syntax from a physics perspective, allowing us to establish equivalences between both fields with many consequences. Mainly, we observe that the operation MERGE, put forward by N. Chomsky in 1995, can be interpreted as a physical information coarse-graining. Thus, MERGE in linguistics entails information renormalization in physics, according to different time scales. We make this point mathematically formal in terms of language models. In this setting, MERGE amounts to a probability tensor implementing a coarse-graining, akin to a probabilistic context-free grammar. The probability vectors of meaningful sentences are given by stochastic tensor networks (TN) built from diagonal tensors and which are mostly loop-free, such as Tree Tensor Networks and Matrix Product States, thus being computationally very efficient to manipulate. We show that this implies the polynomially-decaying (long-range) correlations experimentally observed in language, and also provides arguments in favour of certain types of neural networks for language processing. Moreover, we show how to obtain such language models from quantum states that can be efficiently prepared on a quantum computer, and use this to find bounds on the perplexity of the probability distribution of words in a sentence. Implications of our results are discussed across several ambits.
  • We investigated the ground state of spin-1 bosons interacting under local two- and three-body interactions in one dimension by means of the density matrix renormalization group method. We found that the even-odd asymmetry will be obtained or not depending on the relative values of the two- and three-body interactions. The Mott insulator lobes are spin isotropic, the first showing a dimerized pattern and the second being composed of singlets. The three-body interactions disfavor a longitudinal polar superfluid and a quantum phase transition to a transverse polar superfluid occurs, which could be continuous or discontinuous.
  • We present a model for an autonomous quantum thermal machine comprised of two qubits capable of manipulating and even amplifying the local coherence in a non-degenerate external system. The machine uses only thermal resources, namely, contact with two heat baths at different temperatures, and the external system has a non-zero initial amount of coherence. The method we propose allows for an interconversion between energy, both work and heat, and coherence in an autonomous configuration working in out-of-equilibrium conditions. This model raises interesting questions about the role of fundamental limitations on transformations involving coherence and opens up new possibilities in the manipulation of coherence by autonomous thermal machines.
  • We prove the validity of linear response theory at zero temperature for perturbations of gapped Hamiltonians describing interacting fermions on a lattice. As an essential innovation, our result requires the spectral gap assumption only for the unperturbed Hamiltonian and applies to a large class of perturbations that close the spectral gap. Moreover, we prove formulas also for higher order response coefficients. Our justification of linear response theory is based on a novel extension of the adiabatic theorem to situations where a time-dependent perturbation closes the gap. According to the standard version of the adiabatic theorem, when the perturbation is switched on adiabatically and as long as the gap does not close, the initial ground state evolves into the ground state of the perturbed operator. The new adiabatic theorem states that for perturbations that are either slowly varying potentials or small quasi-local operators, once the perturbation closes the gap, the adiabatic evolution follows non-equilibrium almost-stationary states (NEASS) that we construct explicitly.
  • We study separability problem using general symmetric informationally complete measurements and propose separability criteria in $\mathbb{C}^{d_{1}}\otimes\mathbb{C}^{d_{2}}$ and $\mathbb{C}^{d_{1}}\otimes\mathbb{C}^{d_{2}}\cdots\otimes\mathbb{C}^{d_{n}}$. Our criteria just require less local measurements and provide experimental implementation in detecting entanglement of unknown quantum states.
  • In a previous paper tests for entanglement for two mode systems involving identical massive bosons were obtained. In the present paper we consider sufficiency tests for EPR steering in such systems. We find that spin squeezing in any spin component, a Bloch vector test, the Hillery-Zubairy planar spin variance test and squeezing in two mode quadratures all show that the quantum state is EPR steerable. We also find a generalisation of the Hillery-Zubairy planar spin variance test for EPR steering. The relation to previous correlation tests is discussed. This paper is based on a detailed classification of quantum states for bipartite systems. States for bipartite composite systems are categorised in quantum theory as either separable or entangled, but the states can also be divided differently into Bell local or Bell non-local states in terms of local hidden variable theory (LHVT). For the Bell local states there are three cases depending on whether both, one of or neither of the LHVT probabilities for each sub-system are also given by a quantum probability involving sub-system density operators. Cases where one or both are given by a quantum probability are known as local hidden states (LHS) and such states are non-steerable. The steerable states are the Bell local states where there is no LHS, or the Bell non-local states. The relationship between the quantum and hidden variable theory classification of states is discussed.
  • We introduce a new information theoretic measure of quantum correlations for multiparticle systems. We use a form of multivariate mutual information -- the interaction information and generalize it to multiparticle quantum systems. There are a number of different possible generalizations. We consider two of them. One of them is related to the notion of quantum discord and the other to the concept of quantum dissension. This new measure, called dissension vector, is a set of numbers -- quantumness vector. This can be thought of as a fine-grained measure, as opposed to measures that quantify some average quantum properties of a system. These quantities quantify/characterize the correlations present in multiparticle states. We consider some multiqubit states and find that these quantities are responsive to different aspects of quantumness, and correlations present in a state. We find that different dissension vectors can track the correlations (both classical and quantum), or quantumness only. As physical applications, we find that these vectors might be useful in several information processing tasks. We consider the role of dissension vectors -- (a) in deciding the security of BB84 protocol against an eavesdropper and (b) in determining the possible role of correlations in the performance of Grover search algorithm. Especially, in the Grover search algorithm, we find that dissension vectors can detect the correlations and show the maximum correlations when one expects.
  • We study the Bell inequality in a holographic model of the casually disconnected Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) pair. The Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt(CHSH) form of Bell inequality is constructed using holographic Schwinger-Keldysh (SK) correlators. We show that the manifestation of quantum correlation in Bell inequality can be holographically reproduced from the classical fluctuations of dual accelerating string in the bulk gravity. The violation of this holographic Bell inequality supports the essential quantum property of this holographic model of an EPR pair.
  • The model of a two-electron quantum dot, confined to move in a two dimensional flat space, is revisited. Generally, it is argued that the solutions of this model obtained by solving a biconfluent Heun equation have some limitations. In particular, some corrections are also made in previous theoretical calculations. The corrected polynomial solutions are confronted with numerical calculations based on the Numerov method, in a good agreement between both. Then, new solutions considering the $1/r$ and $\ln r$ Coulombian-like potentials in (1+2)D, not yet obtained, are discussed numerically. In particular, we are able to calculate the quantum dot eigenfunctions for a much larger spectrum of external harmonic frequencies as compared to previous results. Also the existence of bound states for such planar system in the case $l=0$ is predicted and the respective eigenvalues are determined.
  • We present new results on realtime alternating, private alternating, and quantum alternating automaton models. Firstly, we show that the emptiness problem for alternating one-counter automata on unary alphabets is undecidable. Then, we present two equivalent definitions of realtime private alternating finite automata (PAFAs). We show that the emptiness problem is undecidable for PAFAs. Furthermore, PAFAs can recognize some nonregular unary languages, including the unary squares language, which seems to be difficult even for some classical counter automata with two-way input. Regarding quantum finite automata (QFAs), we show that the emptiness problem is undecidable both for universal QFAs on general alphabets, and for alternating QFAs with two alternations on unary alphabets. On the other hand, the same problem is decidable for nondeterministic QFAs on general alphabets. We also show that the unary squares language is recognized by alternating QFAs with two alternations.
  • Matrix syntax is a formal model of syntactic relations in language. The purpose of this paper is to explain its mathematical foundations, for an audience with some formal background. We make an axiomatic presentation, motivating each axiom on linguistic and practical grounds. The resulting mathematical structure resembles some aspects of quantum mechanics. Matrix syntax allows us to describe a number of language phenomena that are otherwise very difficult to explain, such as linguistic chains, and is arguably a more economical theory of language than most of the theories proposed in the context of the minimalist program in linguistics. In particular, sentences are naturally modelled as vectors in a Hilbert space with a tensor product structure, built from 2x2 matrices belonging to some specific group.