• Mean field electrodynamics (MFE) facilitates practical modeling of secular, large scale properties of astrophysical or laboratory systems with fluctuations.Practitioners commonly assume wide scale separation between mean and fluctuating quantities, to justify equality of ensemble and spatial or temporal averages.Often however, real systems do not exhibit such scale separation. This raises two questions: (I) what are the appropriate generalized equations of MFE in the presence of mesoscale fluctuations? (II) how precise are theoretical predictions from MFE? We address both by first deriving the equations of MFE for different types of averaging, along with mesoscale correction terms that depend on the ratio of averaging scale to variation scale of the mean. We then show that even if these terms are small, predictions of MFE can still have a significant precision error. This error has an intrinsic contribution from the dynamo input parameters and a filtering contribution from differences in the way observations and theory are projected through the measurement kernel.Minimizing the sum of these contributions can produce an optimal scale of averaging that makes the theory maximally precise.The precision error is important to quantify when comparing to observations because it quantifies the resolution of predictive power. We exemplify these principles for galactic dynamos, comment on broader implications, and identify possibilities for further work.
  • The commonly used isotropic baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) equation is an approximation derived from empirical and geometric arguments, and the equivalent anisotropic BAO equations were written down by analogy. Using fit-lines to CMB compatible solutions, {\Omega}_{m} and H_{0} values have been derived for BAO studies without recourse to those equations, and have been applied for their appraisal. The isotropic expression becomes problematic at precision levels of ~1 percent or better, and at high redshift values of z = / >1. Most revealing, the anisotropic equations, D_{M}(z)/D_{M,fid}(z)={\alpha}_{\perp}r_{d}/r_{d,fid}, and D_{H}(z)/D_{H,fid}(z)={\alpha}_{\parallel}r_{d}/r_{d,fid}, are invalid when {\alpha} ~ 1, since under that condition, D_{M}(z)/D_{M,fid}(z)=D_{H}(z)/D_{H,fid}(z)=r_{d}/r_{d,fid} ~ 1, and neither equation can be satisfied with anisotropic data. (The ratios are respectively, the angular distance, the inverse Hubble parameter, and the comoving acoustic horizon, each divided by its fiducial value). {\alpha} can be driven towards unity for any data set, e.g., by applying the derived {\Omega}_{m}, H_{0} pair as the core of a second iteration fiducial parameter-set. Thus, the anisotropic equations are untenable. Dissociated from the BAO equations, we have extracted weighted mean values of {\Omega}_{mw}=0.299+/-0.011 and H_{0w}=68.6+/-0.7 km s-1 Mpc-1 for eight uncorrelated BAO data sets.
  • Methyl cyanide is an important trace molecule in space, especially in star-forming regions where it is one of the more common molecules used to derive kinetic temperatures. We want to obtain accurate spectroscopic parameters of minor isotopologs of methyl cyanide in their lowest excited $v_8 = 1$ vibrational states to support astronomical observations, in particular, with interferometers such as ALMA. The laboratory rotational spectrum of methyl cyanide in natural isotopic composition has been recorded from the millimeter to the terahertz regions. Transitions with good signal-to-noise ratios could be identified for the three isotopic species CH$_3^{13}$CN, $^{13}$CH$_3$CN, and CH$_3$C(15)N up to about 1.2 THz ($J'' \le 66$). Accurate spectroscopic parameters were obtained for all three species. The present data were already instrumental in identifying $v_8 = 1$ lines of methyl cyanide with one $^{13}$C in IRAM 30 m and ALMA data toward Sagittarius B2(N).
  • Rotational transitions of $iso$-propyl cyanide, (CH$_3$)$_2$CHCN, also known as $iso$-butyronitrile, were recorded using long-path absorption spectroscopy in selected regions between 37 and 600 GHz. Further measurements were carried out between 6 and 20 GHz employing Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) spectroscopy on a pulsed molecular supersonic jet. The observed transitions reach $J$ and $K_a$ quantum numbers of 103 and 59, respectively, and yield accurate rotational constants as well as distortion parameters up to eighth order. The $^{14}$N nuclear hyperfine splitting was resolved in particular by FTMW spectroscopy yielding spin-rotation parameters as well as very accurate quadrupole coupling terms. In addition, Stark effect measurements were carried out in the microwave region to obtain a largely revised $c$-dipole moment component and to improve the $a$-component. The hyperfine coupling and dipole moment values are compared with values for related molecules both from experiment and from quantum chemical calculations.
  • Methyl cyanide is an important trace molecule in star-forming regions. It is one of the more common molecules used to derive kinetic temperatures in such sources. As preparatory work for Herschel, SOFIA, and in particular ALMA we want to improve the rest frequencies of the main as well as minor isotopologs of methyl cyanide. The laboratory rotational spectrum of methyl cyanide in natural isotopic composition has been recorded up to 1.63 THz. Transitions with good signal-to-noise ratio could be identified for CH$_3$CN, $^{13}$CH$_3$CN, CH$_3^{13}$CN, CH$_3$C$^{15}$N, CH$_2$DCN, and $^{13}$CH$_3^{13}$CN in their ground vibrational states up to about 1.2 THz. The main isotopic species could be identified even in the highest frequency spectral recordings around 1.6 THz. The highest $J'$ quantum numbers included in the fit are 64 for $^{13}$CH$_3^{13}$CN and 89 for the main isotopic species. Greatly improved spectroscopic parameters have been obtained by fitting the present data together with previously reported transition frequencies. The present data will be helpful to identify isotopologs of methyl cyanide in the higher frequency bands of instruments such as the recently launched Herschel satellite, the upcoming airplane mission SOFIA or the radio telescope array ALMA.
  • We study the long-term variability in the optical monitoring database of Ark~120, a nearby radio-quiet active galactic nucleus (AGN) at a distance of 143 Mpc (z=0.03271). We compiled the historical archival photometric and spectroscopic data since 1974 and conducted a new two-year monitoring campaign in 2015-2017, resulting in a total temporal baseline over four decades. The long-term variations in the optical continuum exhibit a wave-like pattern and the Hbeta integrated flux series varies with a similar behavior. The broad Hbeta profiles have asymmetric double peaks, which change strongly with time and tend to merge into a single peak during some epochs. The period in the optical continuum determined from various period-search methods is about 20 yr and the estimated false alarm probability with null hypothesis simulations is about 1*10^-3. The overall variations of the broad Hbeta profiles also follow the same period. However, the present database only covers two cycles of the suggested period, which strongly encourages continued monitoring to track more cycles and confirm the periodicity. Nevertheless, in light of the possible periodicity and the complicated Hbeta profile, Ark~120 is one candidate of the nearest radio-quiet AGNs with possible periodic variability, and it is thereby a potential candidate host for a sub-parsec supermassive black hole binary.
  • Spectra of methyl cyanide were recorded to analyze interactions in low-lying vibrational states and to construct line lists for radio astronomical observations as well as for infrared spectroscopic investigations of planetary atmospheres. The rotational spectra cover large portions of the 36$-$1627 GHz region. In the infrared (IR), a spectrum was recorded for this study in the region of 2$\nu _8$ around 717 cm$^{-1}$ with assignments covering 684$-$765 cm$^{-1}$. Additional spectra in the $\nu _8$ region were used to validate the analysis. The large amount and the high accuracy of the rotational data extend to much higher $J$ and $K$ quantum numbers and allowed us to investigate for the first time in depth local interactions between these states which occur at high $K$ values. In particular, we have detected several interactions between $v_8 = 1$ and 2. Notably, there is a strong $\Delta v_8 = \pm1$, $\Delta K = 0$, $\Delta l = \pm3$ Fermi resonance between $v_8 = 1^{-1}$ and $v_8 = 2^{+2}$ at $K$ = 14. Pronounced effects in the spectrum are also caused by resonant $\Delta v_8 = \pm1$, $\Delta K = \mp2$, $\Delta l = \pm1$ interactions between $v_8 = 1$ and 2. An equivalent resonant interaction occurs between $K$ = 14 of the ground vibrational state and $K$ = 12, $l = +1$ of $v_8 = 1$ for which we present the first detailed account. A preliminary account was given in an earlier study on the ground vibrational state. From data pertaining to $v_8 = 2$, we also investigated rotational interactions with $v_4 = 1$ as well as $\Delta v_8 = \pm1$, $\Delta K = 0$, $\Delta l = \pm3$ Fermi interactions between $v_8 = 2$ and 3. We have derived N$_2$- and self-broadening coefficients for the $\nu _8$, 2$\nu _8 - \nu _8$, and 2$\nu _8$ bands from previously determined nu4 values. Subsequently, we determined transition moments and intensities for the three IR bands.
  • We study the abundance of subhaloes in the hydrodynamical cosmological simulation Illustris, which includes both baryons and dark matter in a $\Lambda$CDM volume 106.5 Mpc a side. We compare Illustris to its dark matter-only (DMO) analogue, Illustris-Dark, and quantify the effects of baryonic processes on the demographics of subhaloes in the host mass range $10^{11}$ to $3 \times 10^{14} \msun$. We focus on both the evolved ($z=0$) subhalo cumulative mass functions (SHMF) and the statistics of subhaloes ever accreted, i.e. infall subhalo mass function. We quantify the variance in subhalo abundance at fixed host mass and investigate the physical reasons responsible for such scatter. We find that in Illustris, baryonic physics impacts both the infall and $z=0$ subhalo abundance by tilting the DMO function and suppressing the abundance of low-mass subhaloes. The breaking of self-similarity in the subhalo abundance at $z=0$ is enhanced by the inclusion of baryonic physics. The non-monotonic alteration of the evolved subhalo abundances can be explained by the modification of the concentration--mass relation of Illustris hosts compared to Illustris-Dark.Interestingly, the baryonic implementation in Illustris does not lead to an increase in the halo-to-halo variation compared to Illustris-Dark. In both cases, the normalized intrinsic scatter today is larger for Milky Way-like haloes than for cluster-sized objects. For Milky Way-like haloes, it increases from about eight per cent at infall to about 25 per cent at the current epoch. In both runs, haloes of fixed mass formed later host more subhaloes than early formers.
  • The rotational spectrum of the formaldehyde isotopologue H$_2$C$^{17}$O was investigated between 0.56 and 1.50 THz using a sample of natural isotopic composition. In addition, transition frequencies were determined for H$_2$C$^{18}$O and H$_2$C$^{16}$O between 1.37 and 1.50 THz. The data were combined with critically evaluated literature data to derive improved sets of spectroscopic parameters which include $^{17}$O or H nuclear hyperfine structure parameters.
  • The study of the rotational spectrum of NaCN (X $^1$A') has recently been extended in frequency and in quantum numbers. Difficulties have been encountered in fitting the transition frequencies within experimental uncertainties. Various trial fits traced the difficulties to the incomplete diagonalization of the Hamiltonian. Employing fewer spectroscopic parameters than before, the transition frequencies could be reproduced within experimental uncertainties on average. Predictions of $a$-type $R$-branch transitions with $K_a \le 7$ up to 570 GHz should be reliable to better than 1 MHz. In addition, modified spectroscopic parameters have been derived for the 13C isotopic species of NaCN.
  • A molecular line survey has been carried out toward the carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch star CW Leo employing the HIFI instrument on board of the Herschel satellite. Numerous features from 480 GHz to beyond 1100 GHz could be assigned unambiguously to the fairly floppy SiC$_2$ molecule. However, predictions from laboratory data exhibited large deviations from the observed frequencies even after some lower frequency data from this survey were incorporated into a fit. Therefore, we present a combined fit of all available laboratory data together with data from radio-astronomical observations.
  • Chemistry plays an important role in the interstellar medium (ISM), regulating heating and cooling of the gas, and determining abundances of molecular species that trace gas properties in observations. Although solving the time-dependent equations is necessary for accurate abundances and temperature in the dynamic ISM, a full chemical network is too computationally expensive to incorporate in numerical simulations. In this paper, we propose a new simplified chemical network for hydrogen and carbon chemistry in the atomic and molecular ISM. We compare results from our chemical network in detail with results from a full photo-dissociation region (PDR) code, and also with the Nelson & Langer (1999) (NL99) network previously adopted in the simulation literature. We show that our chemical network gives similar results to the PDR code in the equilibrium abundances of all species over a wide range of densities, temperature, and metallicities, whereas the NL99 network shows significant disagreement. Applying our network in 1D models, we find that the $\mathrm{CO}$-dominated regime delimits the coldest gas and that the corresponding temperature tracks the cosmic ray ionization rate in molecular clouds. We provide a simple fit for the locus of $\mathrm{CO}$ dominated regions as a function of gas density and column. We also compare with observations of diffuse and translucent clouds. We find that the $\mathrm{CO}$, $\mathrm{CHx}$ and $\mathrm{OHx}$ abundances are consistent with equilibrium predictions for densities $n=100-1000~\mathrm{cm^{-3}}$, but the predicted equilibrium $\mathrm{C}$ abundance is higher than observations, signaling the potential importance of non-equilibrium/dynamical effects.
  • The nearby ultra-luminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) Arp 220 is an excellent laboratory for studies of extreme astrophysical environments. For 20 years, Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) has been used to monitor a population of compact sources thought to be supernovae (SNe), supernova remnants (SNRs) and possibly active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Using new and archival VLBI data spanning 20 years, we obtain 23 high-resolution radio images of Arp 220 at wavelengths from 18 cm to 2 cm. From model-fitting to the images we obtain estimates of flux densities and sizes of all detected sources. We detect radio continuum emission from 97 compact sources and present flux densities and sizes for all analysed observation epochs. We find evidence for a LD-relation within Arp 220, with larger sources being less luminous. We find a compact source LF $n(L)\propto L^\beta$ with $\beta=-2.19\pm0.15$, similar to SNRs in normal galaxies. Based on simulations we argue that there are many relatively large and weak sources below our detection threshold. The observations can be explained by a mixed population of SNe and SNRs, where the former expand in a dense circumstellar medium (CSM) and the latter interact with the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM). Nine sources are likely luminous, type IIn SNe. This number of luminous SNe correspond to few percent of the total number of SNe in Arp 220 which is consistent with a total SN-rate of 4 yr$^{-1}$ as inferred from the total radio emission given a normal stellar initial mass function (IMF). Based on the fitted luminosity function, we argue that emission from all compact sources, also below our detection threshold, make up at most 20\% of the total radio emission at GHz frequencies.
  • Radiation in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray holds clues to the location of the missing baryons, the energetics in stellar feedback processes, and the cosmic enrichment history. Additionally, EUV and soft X-ray photons help determine the ionization state of most intergalactic and circumgalactic metals, shaping the rate at which cosmic gas cools. Unfortunately, this band is extremely difficult to probe observationally due to absorption from the Galaxy. In this paper, we model the contributions of various sources to the cosmic EUV and soft X-ray backgrounds. We bracket the contribution from (1) quasars, (2) X-ray binaries, (3) hot interstellar gas, (4) circumgalactic gas, (5) virialized gas, and (6) supersoft sources, developing models that extrapolate into these bands using both empirical and theoretical inputs. While quasars are traditionally assumed to dominate these backgrounds, we discuss the substantial uncertainty in their contribution. Furthermore, we find that hot intrahalo gases likely emit an O(1) fraction of this radiation at low redshifts, and that interstellar and circumgalactic emission potentially contribute tens of percent to these backgrounds at all redshifts. We estimate that uncertainties in the angular-averaged background intensity impact the ionization corrections for common circumgalactic and intergalactic metal absorption lines by ~0.3-1 dex, and we show that local emissions are comparable to the cosmic background only at r_prox = 10-100 kpc from Milky Way-like galaxies.
  • \textbf{GalRotpy} is an educational \verb+Python3+-based visual tool, which is useful to undestand how is the contribution of each mass component to the gravitational potential of disc-like galaxies by means of their rotation curve. Besides, \textbf{GalRotpy} allows the user to perform a parametric fit of a given rotation curve, which relies on a MCMC procedure implemented by using \verb+emcee+ package. Here the gravitational potential of disc-like galaxies is built from the contribution of a Miyamoto-Nagai potential model for the bulge/core and the thin/thick disc, an exponential disc, together with the NFW (Navarro-Frenk- White) potential or the Burkert (cored density profile) potential for the Dark Matter halo, where each contribution is implemented by using \verb+galpy+ package. We summarize the properties of each contribution to the rotation curve involved, and then describe how \textbf{GalRotpy} is implemented along with its capabilities. Finally we present the characterization of two galaxies, NGC6361 and M33, and show that the results for M33 provided by \textbf{GalRotpy} are consistent with those found in the literature.
  • Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are believed to be obscured by an optical thick "torus" that covers a large fraction of solid angles for the nuclei. However, the physical origin of the tori and the differences in the tori among AGNs are not clear. In a previous paper based on three-dimensional radiation-hydorodynamic calculations, we proposed a physics-based mechanism for the obscuration, called "radiation-driven fountains," in which the circulation of the gas driven by central radiation naturally forms a thick disk that partially obscures the nuclear emission. Here, we expand this mechanism and conduct a series of simulations to explore how obscuration depends on the properties of AGNs. We found that the obscuring fraction f_obs for a given column density toward the AGNs changes depending on both the AGN luminosity and the black hole mass. In particular, f_obs for N_H \geq 10^22 cm^-2 increases from ~0.2 to ~0.6 as a function of the X-ray luminosity L_X in the 10^{42-44} ergs/s range, but f_obs becomes small (~0.4) above a luminosity (~10^{45} ergs/s). The behaviors of f_obs can be understood by a simple analytic model and provide insight into the redshift evolution of the obscuration. The simulations also show that for a given L_AGN, f_obs is always smaller (~0.2-0.3) for a larger column density (N_H \geq 10^23 cm^-2). We also found cases that more than 70% of the solid angles can be covered by the fountain flows.
  • Despite low elemental abundance of atomic deuterium in interstellar medium (ISM), observational evidences suggest that several species in gas-phase and in ices could be heavily fractionated. We explore various aspects of deuterium enrichment by constructing a chemical evolution model in gas and grain phases. Depending on various physical parameters, gas and grains are allowed to interact with each other through exchange of their chemical species. It is known that HCO+ and N2H+ are two abundant gas phase ions in ISM and their deuterium fractionation are generally used to predict degree of ionization in various regions of a molecular cloud. To have a more realistic estimation, we consider a density profile of a collapsing cloud. We present radial distributions of important interstellar molecules along with their deuterated isotopomers. We carry out quantum chemical simulation to study effects of isotopic substitution on spectral properties of these important interstellar species. We calculate vibrational (harmonic) frequency of the most important deuterated species (neutral & ions). Rotational and distortional constants of these molecules are also computed to predict rotational transitions of these species. We compare vibrational (harmonic) and rotational transitions as computed by us with existing observational, experimental and theoretical results. We hope that our results would assist observers in their quest of several hitherto unobserved deuterated species.
  • I extract the radio spectral index, $\alpha$, from 541,195 common sources observed in the 150 MHz TIFR GMRT Sky Survey (TGSS) and the 1.4 GHz NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS). This large common source catalogue covers about $80\%$ of the sky. The flux density limits in these surveys are such that the observed galaxies are presumably hosts of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). I confirm the steepening of $\alpha$ with increasing flux density for this large sample and provide a parametric fit between $\alpha$ and flux density. Next, I divide the data into a low flux (LF) and a high flux (HF) density sample of roughly equal number of galaxies. The LF sample contains all galaxies below 100 mJy TGSS and 20 mJy NVSS flux density and the HF sample is all galaxies above 100 mJy TGSS and 20 mJy NVSS. I observe an increase in $\alpha$ with source size (TGSS measured), saturating for large sizes to $0.89\pm0.22$ and $0.76\pm 0.21$ for the LF and HF sources, respectively. I discuss the observed results and possible physical mechanisms to explain observed $\alpha$ dependence with source size for LF and HF samples.
  • K. C. Chambers, E. A. Magnier, N. Metcalfe, H. A. Flewelling, M. E. Huber, C. Z. Waters, L. Denneau, P. W. Draper, D. Farrow, D. P. Finkbeiner, C. Holmberg, J. Koppenhoefer, P. A. Price, A. Rest, R. P. Saglia, E. F. Schlafly, S. J. Smartt, W. Sweeney, R. J. Wainscoat, W. S. Burgett, S. Chastel, T. Grav, J. N. Heasley, K. W. Hodapp, R. Jedicke, N. Kaiser, R.-P. Kudritzki, G. A. Luppino, R. H. Lupton, D. G. Monet, J. S. Morgan, P. M. Onaka, B. Shiao, C. W. Stubbs, J. L. Tonry, R. White, E. Bañados, E. F. Bell, R. Bender, E. J. Bernard, M. Boegner, F. Boffi, M. T. Botticella, A. Calamida, S. Casertano, W.-P. Chen, X. Chen, S. Cole, N. Deacon, C. Frenk, A. Fitzsimmons, S. Gezari, V. Gibbs, C. Goessl, T. Goggia, R. Gourgue, B. Goldman, P. Grant, E. K. Grebel, N.C. Hambly, G. Hasinger, A. F. Heavens, T. M. Heckman, R. Henderson, T. Henning, M. Holman, U. Hopp, W.-H. Ip, S. Isani, M. Jackson, C. D. Keyes, A. M. Koekemoer, R. Kotak, D. Le, D. Liska, K. S. Long, J. R. Lucey, M. Liu, N. F. Martin, G. Masci, B. McLean, E. Mindel, P. Misra, E. Morganson, D. N. A. Murphy, A. Obaika, G. Narayan, M. A. Nieto-Santisteban, P. Norberg, J. A. Peacock, E. A. Pier, M. Postman, N. Primak, C. Rae, A. Rai, A. Riess, A. Riffeser, H. W. Rix, S. Röser, R. Russel, L. Rutz, E. Schilbach, A. S. B. Schultz, D. Scolnic, L. Strolger, A. Szalay, S. Seitz, E. Small, K. W. Smith, D. R. Soderblom, P. Taylor, R. Thomson, A. N. Taylor, A. R. Thakar, J. Thiel, D. Thilker, D. Unger, Y. Urata, J. Valenti, J. Wagner, T. Walder, F. Walter, S. P. Watters, S. Werner, W. M. Wood-Vasey, R. Wyse
    Pan-STARRS1 has carried out a set of distinct synoptic imaging sky surveys including the $3\pi$ Steradian Survey and the Medium Deep Survey in 5 bands ($grizy_{P1}$). The mean 5$\sigma$ point source limiting sensitivities in the stacked 3$\pi$ Steradian Survey in $grizy_{P1}$ are (23.3, 23.2, 23.1, 22.3, 21.4) respectively. The upper bound on the systematic uncertainty in the photometric calibration across the sky is 7-12 millimag depending on the bandpass. The systematic uncertainty of the astrometric calibration using the Gaia frame comes from a comparison of the results with Gaia: the standard deviation of the mean and median residuals ($ \Delta ra, \Delta dec $) are (2.3, 1.7) milliarcsec, and (3.1, 4.8) milliarcsec respectively. The Pan-STARRS system and the design of the PS1 surveys are described and an overview of the resulting image and catalog data products and their basic characteristics are described together with a summary of important results. The images, reduced data products, and derived data products from the Pan-STARRS1 surveys are available to the community from the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) at STScI.
  • Relations between radio surface brightness ($\Sigma$) and diameter ($D$) of supernova remnants (SNRs) are important in astronomy. In this paper, following the work Duric \& Seaquist (1986) at adiabatic phase, we carefully investigate shell-type supernova remnants at radiative phase, and obtain theoretical $\Sigma$-$D$ relation at radiative phase of shell-type supernova remnants at 1 GHz. By using these theoretical $\Sigma$-$D$ relations at adiabatic phase and radiative phase, we also roughly determine phases of some supernova remnant from observation data.
  • Luminous high-redshift quasars can be used to probe of the intergalactic medium (IGM) in the early universe because their UV light is absorbed by the neutral hydrogen along the line of sight. They help us to measure the neutral hydrogen fraction of the high-z universe, shedding light on the end of reionization epoch. In this paper, we present a discovery of a new quasar (PSO J006.1240+39.2219) at redshift $z=6.61\pm0.02$ from Panoramic Survey Telescope & Rapid Response System 1. Including this quasar, there are nine quasars above $z>6.5$ up to date. The estimated continuum brightness is $M_\text{1450}$=$-25.96\pm0.08$. PSO J006.1240+39.2219 has a strong Ly~$\alpha$ emission compared with typical low-redshift quasars, but the measured near-zone region size is $R_\text{NZ}=3.2\pm1.1$ proper megaparsecs, which is consistent with other quasars at z$\sim$6.
  • This review presents a comprehensive overview of galaxy bias, that is, the statistical relation between the distribution of galaxies and matter. We focus on large scales where cosmic density fields are quasi-linear. On these scales, the clustering of galaxies can be described by a perturbative bias expansion, and the complicated physics of galaxy formation is absorbed by a finite set of coefficients of the expansion, called bias parameters. The review begins with a detailed derivation of this very important result, which forms the basis of the rigorous perturbative description of galaxy clustering, under the assumptions of General Relativity and Gaussian, adiabatic initial conditions. Key components of the bias expansion are all leading local gravitational observables, which include the matter density but also tidal fields and their time derivatives. We hence expand the definition of local bias to encompass all these contributions. This derivation is followed by a presentation of the peak-background split in its general form, which elucidates the physical meaning of the bias parameters, and a detailed description of the connection between bias parameters and galaxy statistics. We then review the excursion-set formalism and peak theory which provide predictions for the values of the bias parameters. In the remainder of the review, we consider the generalizations of galaxy bias required in the presence of various types of cosmological physics that go beyond pressureless matter with adiabatic, Gaussian initial conditions: primordial non-Gaussianity, massive neutrinos, baryon-CDM isocurvature perturbations, dark energy, and modified gravity. Finally, we discuss how the description of galaxy bias in the galaxies' rest frame is related to clustering statistics measured from the observed angular positions and redshifts in actual galaxy catalogs.
  • We study the properties of long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) using a large scale hydrodynamical cosmological simulation, the Illustris simulation. We determine the LGRB host populations under different thresholds for the LGRB progenitor metallicities, according to the collapsar model. We compare the simulated sample of LGRBs hosts with recent, largely unbiased, host samples: BAT6 and SHOALS. We find that at $z<1$ simulated hosts follow the mass-metallicity relation and the fundamental metallicity relation simultaneously, but with a paucity of high-metallicity hosts, in accordance with observations. We also find a clear increment in the mean stellar mass of LGRB hosts and their SFR with redshift up to $z<3$ on account of the metallicity dependence of progenitors. We explore the possible origin of LGRBs in metal rich galaxies, and find that the intrinsic metallicity dispersion in galaxies could explain their presence. LGRB hosts present a tighter correlation between galaxy metallicity and internal metallicity dispersion compared to normal star forming galaxies. We find that the Illustris simulations favours the existence of a metallicity threshold for LGRB progenitors in the range 0.3 - 0.6 Z$_\odot$
  • The local velocity distribution of dark matter plays an integral role in interpreting the results from direct detection experiments. We previously showed that metal-poor halo stars serve as excellent tracers of the virialized dark matter velocity distribution using a high-resolution hydrodynamic simulation of a Milky Way--like halo. In this paper, we take advantage of the first \textit{Gaia} data release, coupled with spectroscopic measurements from the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE), to study the kinematics of stars belonging to the metal-poor halo within an average distance of $\sim 5$ kpc of the Sun. We study stars with iron abundances [Fe/H]$ < -1.5$ and $-1.8$ that are located more than $1.5$ kpc from the Galactic plane. Using a Gaussian mixture model analysis, we identify the stars that belong to the halo population, as well as some kinematic outliers. We find that both metallicity samples have similar velocity distributions for the halo component, within uncertainties. Assuming that the stellar halo velocities adequately trace the virialized dark matter, we study the implications for direct detection experiments. The Standard Halo Model, which is typically assumed for dark matter, is discrepant with the empirical distribution by $\sim6\sigma$ and predicts fewer high-speed particles. As a result, the Standard Halo Model overpredicts the nuclear scattering rate for dark matter masses below $\sim 10$ GeV. The kinematic outliers that we identify may potentially be correlated with dark matter substructure, though further study is needed to establish this correspondence.
  • Outflows in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are crucial to understand in investigating the co-evolution of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxies since outflows may play an important role as an AGN feedback mechanism. Based on the archival UV spectra obtained with HST and IUE, we investigate outflows in the broad-line region (BLR) in low-redshift AGNs (z < 0.4) through the detailed analysis of the velocity profile of the CIV emission line. We find a dependence of the outflow strength on the Eddington ratio and the BLR metallicity in our low-redshift AGN sample, which is consistent with the earlier results obtained for high-redshift quasars. These results suggest that the BLR outflows, gas accretion onto SMBH, and past star-formation activity in the host galaxies are physically related in low-redshift AGNs as in powerful high-redshift quasars.