• For a regular cardinal $\kappa$, a formula of the modal $\mu$-calculus is $\kappa$-continuous in a variable x if, on every model, its interpretation as a unary function of x is monotone and preserves unions of $\kappa$-directed sets. We define the fragment $C_{\aleph_1}(x)$ of the modal $\mu$-calculus and prove that all the formulas in this fragment are $\aleph_1$-continuous. For each formula $\phi(x)$ of the modal $\mu$-calculus, we construct a formula $\psi(x) \in C_{\aleph_1 }(x)$ such that $\phi(x)$ is $\kappa$-continuous, for some $\kappa$, if and only if $\phi(x)$ is equivalent to $\psi(x)$. Consequently, we prove that (i) the problem whether a formula is $\kappa$-continuous for some $\kappa$ is decidable, (ii) up to equivalence, there are only two fragments determined by continuity at some regular cardinal: the fragment $C_{\aleph_0}(x)$ studied by Fontaine and the fragment $C_{\aleph_1}(x)$. We apply our considerations to the problem of characterizing closure ordinals of formulas of the modal $\mu$-calculus. An ordinal $\alpha$ is the closure ordinal of a formula $\phi(x)$ if its interpretation on every model converges to its least fixed-point in at most $\alpha$ steps and if there is a model where the convergence occurs exactly in $\alpha$ steps. We prove that $\omega_1$, the least uncountable ordinal, is such a closure ordinal. Moreover we prove that closure ordinals are closed under ordinal sum. Thus, any formal expression built from 0, 1, $\omega$, $\omega_1$ by using the binary operator symbol + gives rise to a closure ordinal.
  • We introduce a parametrized version of the Wadge game for functions and show that each lower cone in the Weihrauch degrees is characterized by such a game. These parametrized Wadge games subsume the original Wadge game, the eraser and backtrack games as well as Semmes's tree games. In particular, we propose that the lower cones in the Weihrauch degrees are the answer to Andretta's question on which classes of functions admit game characterizations. We then discuss some applications of such parametrized Wadge games. Using machinery from Weihrauch reducibility theory, we introduce games characterizing every (transfinite) level of the Baire hierarchy via an iteration of a pruning derivative on countably branching trees.
  • We investigate powerspace constructions on topological spaces, with a particular focus on the category of quasi-Polish spaces. We show that the upper and lower powerspaces commute on all quasi-Polish spaces, and show more generally that this commutativity is equivalent to the topological property of consonance. We then investigate powerspace constructions on the open set lattices of quasi-Polish spaces, and provide a complete characterization of how the upper and lower powerspaces distribute over the open set lattice construction.
  • Our concern is the completeness problem for spi-logics, that is, sets of implications between strictly positive formulas built from propositional variables, conjunction and modal diamond operators. Originated in logic, algebra and computer science, spi-logics have two natural semantics: meet-semilattices with monotone operators providing Birkhoff-style calculi, and first-order relational structures (aka Kripke frames) often used as the intended structures in applications. Here we lay foundations for a completeness theory that aims to answer the question whether the two semantics define the same consequence relations for a given spi-logic.
  • Univalent homotopy type theory (HoTT) may be seen as a language for the category of $\infty$-groupoids. It is being developed as a new foundation for mathematics and as an internal language for (elementary) higher toposes. We develop the theory of factorization systems, reflective subuniverses, and modalities in homotopy type theory, including their construction using a "localization" higher inductive type. This produces in particular the ($n$-connected, $n$-truncated) factorization system as well as internal presentations of subtoposes, through lex modalities. We also develop the semantics of these constructions.
  • Recently, J. D. Lawson encouraged the domain theory community to consider the scientific program of developing domain theory in the wider context of $T_0$ spaces instead of restricting to posets. In this paper, we respond to this calling with an attempt to formulate a topological version of the Scott Convergence Theorem, i.e., an order-theoretic characterisation of those posets for which the Scott-convergence $\mathcal{S}$ is topological. To do this, we make use of the $\mathcal{ID}$ replacement principle to create topological analogues of well-known domain-theoretic concepts, e.g., $\mathcal{I}$-continuous spaces correspond to continuous posets, as $\mathcal{I}$-convergence corresponds to $\mathcal{S}$-convergence. In this paper, we consider two novel topological concepts, namely, the $\mathcal{I}$-stable spaces and the $\mathcal{DI}$ spaces, and as a result we obtain some necessary (respectively, sufficient) conditions under which the convergence structure $\mathcal{I}$ is topological.
  • It has been known since Ehrhard and Regnier's seminal work on the Taylor expansion of $\lambda$-terms that this operation commutes with normalization: the expansion of a $\lambda$-term is always normalizable and its normal form is the expansion of the B\"ohm tree of the term. We generalize this result to the non-uniform setting of the algebraic $\lambda$-calculus, i.e. $\lambda$-calculus extended with linear combinations of terms. This requires us to tackle two difficulties: foremost is the fact that Ehrhard and Regnier's techniques rely heavily on the uniform, deterministic nature of the ordinary $\lambda$-calculus, and thus cannot be adapted; second is the absence of any satisfactory generic extension of the notion of B\"ohm tree in presence of quantitative non-determinism, which is reflected by the fact that the Taylor expansion of an algebraic $\lambda$-term is not always normalizable. Our solution is to provide a fine grained study of the dynamics of $\beta$-reduction under Taylor expansion, by introducing a notion of reduction on resource vectors, i.e. infinite linear combinations of resource $\lambda$-terms. The latter form the multilinear fragment of the differential $\lambda$-calculus, and resource vectors are the target of the Taylor expansion of $\lambda$-terms. We show the reduction of resource vectors contains the image of any $\beta$-reduction step, from which we deduce that Taylor expansion and normalization commute on the nose. We moreover identify a class of algebraic $\lambda$-terms, encompassing both normalizable algebraic $\lambda$-terms and arbitrary ordinary $\lambda$-terms: the expansion of these is always normalizable, which guides the definition of a generalization of B\"ohm trees to this setting.
  • We give an algebraic characterization of the syntax and operational semantics of a class of simply-typed languages, such as the language PCF: we characterize simply-typed syntax with variable binding and equipped with reduction rules via a universal property, namely as the initial object of some category of models. For this purpose, we employ techniques developed in two previous works: in the first work we model syntactic translations between languages over different sets of types as initial morphisms in a category of models. In the second work we characterize untyped syntax with reduction rules as initial object in a category of models. In the present work, we combine the techniques used earlier in order to characterize simply-typed syntax with reduction rules as initial object in a category. The universal property yields an operator which allows to specify translations---that are semantically faithful by construction---between languages over possibly different sets of types. As an example, we upgrade a translation from PCF to the untyped lambda calculus, given in previous work, to account for reduction in the source and target. Specifically, we specify a reduction semantics in the source and target language through suitable rules. By equipping the untyped lambda calculus with the structure of a model of PCF, initiality yields a translation from PCF to the lambda calculus, that is faithful with respect to the reduction semantics specified by the rules. This paper is an extended version of an article published in the proceedings of WoLLIC 2012.
  • We consider previous models of Timed, Probabilistic and Stochastic Timed Automata, we introduce our model of Timed Automata with Polynomial Delay and we characterize the expressiveness of these models relative to each other.
  • Automata expressiveness is an essential feature in understanding which of the formalisms available should be chosen for modelling a particular problem. Probabilistic and stochastic automata are suitable for modelling systems exhibiting probabilistic behavior and their expressiveness has been studied relative to non-probabilistic transition systems and Markov chains. In this paper, we consider previous formalisms of Timed, Probabilistic and Stochastic Timed Automata, we present our new model of Timed Automata with Polynomial Delay, we introduce a measure of expressiveness for automata we call trace expressiveness and we characterize the expressiveness of these models relative to each other under this new measure.
  • LP$^{\supset,\mathsf{F}}$ is a three-valued paraconsistent propositional logic which is essentially the same as J3. It has most properties that have been proposed as desirable properties of a reasonable paraconsistent propositional logic. However, it follows easily from already published results that there are exactly 8192 different three-valued paraconsistent propositional logics that have the properties concerned. In this note, properties concerning the logical equivalence relation of a logic are used to distinguish LP$^{\supset,\mathsf{F}}$ from the others. As one of the bonuses of focussing on the logical equivalence relation, it is found that only 32 of the 8192 logics have a logical equivalence relation that satisfies the identity, annihilation, idempotent, and commutative laws for conjunction and disjunction.
  • Stone-type duality theorems, which relate algebraic and relational/topological models, are important tools in logic because -- in addition to elegant abstraction -- they strengthen soundness and completeness to a categorical equivalence, yielding a framework through which both algebraic and topological methods can be brought to bear on a logic. We give a systematic treatment of Stone-type duality for the structures that interpret bunched logics, starting with the weakest systems, recovering the familiar BI and Boolean BI (BBI), and extending to both classical and intuitionistic Separation Logic. We demonstrate the uniformity and modularity of this analysis by additionally capturing the bunched logics obtained by extending BI and BBI with modalities and multiplicative connectives corresponding to disjunction, negation and falsum. This includes the logic of separating modalities (LSM), De Morgan BI (DMBI), Classical BI (CBI), and the sub-classical family of logics extending Bi-intuitionistic (B)BI (Bi(B)BI). We additionally obtain as corollaries soundness and completeness theorems for the specific Kripke-style models of these logics as presented in the literature: for DMBI, the sub-classical logics extending BiBI and a new bunched logic, Concurrent Kleene BI (connecting our work to Concurrent Separation Logic), this is the first time soundness and completeness theorems have been proved. We thus obtain a comprehensive semantic account of the multiplicative variants of all standard propositional connectives in the bunched logic setting. This approach synthesises a variety of techniques from modal, substructural and categorical logic and contextualizes the "resource semantics" interpretation underpinning Separation Logic amongst them.
  • We present new results on realtime alternating, private alternating, and quantum alternating automaton models. Firstly, we show that the emptiness problem for alternating one-counter automata on unary alphabets is undecidable. Then, we present two equivalent definitions of realtime private alternating finite automata (PAFAs). We show that the emptiness problem is undecidable for PAFAs. Furthermore, PAFAs can recognize some nonregular unary languages, including the unary squares language, which seems to be difficult even for some classical counter automata with two-way input. Regarding quantum finite automata (QFAs), we show that the emptiness problem is undecidable both for universal QFAs on general alphabets, and for alternating QFAs with two alternations on unary alphabets. On the other hand, the same problem is decidable for nondeterministic QFAs on general alphabets. We also show that the unary squares language is recognized by alternating QFAs with two alternations.
  • Computers may control safety-critical operations in machines having embedded software. This memoir proposes a regimen to verify such algorithms at prescribed levels of statistical confidence. The United States Department of Defense standard for system safety engineering (MIL-STD-882E) defines development procedures for safety-critical systems. However, a problem exists: the Standard fails to distinguish quantitative product assurance technique from categorical process assurance method for software development. Resulting is conflict in the technical definition of the term risk. The primary goal here is to show that a quantitative risk-based product assurance method exists and is consistent with hardware practice. Discussion appears in two major parts: theory, which shows the relationship between automata and software; and application, which covers demonstration and indemnification. Demonstration is a technique for generating random tests; indemnification converts pass/fail test results to compound Poisson parameters (severity and intensity). Together, demonstration and indemnification yield statistical confidence that safety-critical code meets design intent. Statistical confidence is the keystone of quantitative product assurance. A secondary goal is resolving the conflict over the term risk. The first meaning is an accident model known in mathematics as the compound Poisson stochastic process, and so is called statistical risk. Various of its versions underlie the theories of safety and reliability. The second is called developmental risk. It considers software autonomy, which considers time until manual recovery of control. Once these meanings are separated, MIL-STD-882 can properly support either formal quantitative safety assurance or empirical process robustness, which differ in impact.
  • Assigning a satisfactory truly concurrent semantics to Petri nets with confusion and distributed decisions is a long standing problem, especially if one wants to resolve decisions by drawing from some probability distribution. Here we propose a general solution based on a recursive, static decomposition of (occurrence) nets in loci of decision, called structural branching cells (s-cells). Each s-cell exposes a set of alternatives, called transactions. Our solution transforms a given Petri net into another net whose transitions are the transactions of the s-cells and whose places are those of the original net, with some auxiliary structure for bookkeeping. The resulting net is confusion-free, and thus conflicting alternatives can be equipped with probabilistic choices, while nonintersecting alternatives are purely concurrent and their probability distributions are independent. The validity of the construction is witnessed by a tight correspondence with the recursively stopped configurations of Abbes and Benveniste. Some advantages of our approach are that: i) s-cells are defined statically and locally in a compositional way; ii) our resulting nets faithfully account for concurrency.
  • Given a graph $F$, let $I(F)$ be the class of graphs containing $F$ as an induced subgraph. Let $W[F]$ denote the minimum $k$ such that $I(F)$ is definable in $k$-variable first-order logic. The recognition problem of $I(F)$, known as Induced Subgraph Isomorphism (for the pattern graph $F$), is solvable in time $O(n^{W[F]})$. Motivated by this fact, we are interested in determining or estimating the value of $W[F]$. Using Olariu's characterization of paw-free graphs, we show that $I(K_3+e)$ is definable by a first-order sentence of quantifier depth 3, where $K_3+e$ denotes the paw graph. This provides an example of a graph $F$ with $W[F]$ strictly less than the number of vertices in $F$. On the other hand, we prove that $W[F]=4$ for all $F$ on 4 vertices except the paw graph and its complement. If $F$ is a graph on $t$ vertices, we prove a general lower bound $W[F]>(1/2-o(1))t$, where the function in the little-o notation approaches 0 as $t$ inreases. This bound holds true even for a related parameter $W^*[F]\le W[F]$, which is defined as the minimum $k$ such that $I(F)$ is definable in the infinitary logic $L^k_{\infty\omega}$. We show that $W^*[F]$ can be strictly less than $W[F]$. Specifically, $W^*[P_4]=3$ for $P_4$ being the path graph on 4 vertices. Using the lower bound for $W[F]$, we also obtain a succintness result for existential monadic second-order logic: A usage of just one monadic quantifier sometimes reduces the first-order quantifier depth at a super-recursive rate.
  • We show that any one-counter automaton with $n$ states, if its language is non-empty, accepts some word of length at most $O(n^2)$. This closes the gap between the previously known upper bound of $O(n^3)$ and lower bound of $\Omega(n^2)$. More generally, we prove a tight upper bound on the length of shortest paths between arbitrary configurations in one-counter transition systems (weaker bounds have previously appeared in the literature).
  • We build a cartesian closed category, called Cho, based on event structures. It allows an interpretation of higher-order stateful concurrent programs that is refined and precise: on the one hand it is conservative with respect to standard Hyland-Ong games when interpreting purely functional programs as innocent strategies, while on the other hand it is much more expressive. The interpretation of programs constructs compositionally a representation of their execution that exhibits causal dependencies and remembers the points of non-deterministic branching.The construction is in two stages. First, we build a compact closed category Tcg. It is a variant of Rideau and Winskel's category CG, with the difference that games and strategies in Tcg are equipped with symmetry to express that certain events are essentially the same. This is analogous to the underlying category of AJM games enriching simple games with an equivalence relations on plays. Building on this category, we construct the cartesian closed category Cho as having as objects the standard arenas of Hyland-Ong games, with strategies, represented by certain events structures, playing on games with symmetry obtained as expanded forms of these arenas.To illustrate and give an operational light on these constructions, we interpret (a close variant of) Idealized Parallel Algol in Cho.
  • A C*-algebra is determined to a great extent by the partial order of its commutative C*-algebras. We study order-theoretic properties of this dcpo. Many properties coincide: the dcpo is, equivalently, algebraic, continuous, meet-continuous, atomistic, quasi-algebraic, or quasi-continuous, if and only if the C*-algebra is scattered. For C*-algebras with enough projections, these properties are equivalent to finite-dimensionality. Approximately finite-dimensional elements of the dcpo correspond to Boolean subalgebras of the projections of the C*-algebra, which determine the projections up to isomorphism. Scattered C*-algebras are finite-dimensional if and only if their dcpo is Lawson-scattered. General C*-algebras are finite-dimensional if and only if their dcpo is order-scattered.
  • Recent developments in formal verification have identified approximate liftings (also known as approximate couplings) as a clean, compositional abstraction for proving differential privacy. This construction can be defined in two styles. Earlier definitions require the existence of one or more witness distributions, while a recent definition by Sato uses universal quantification over all sets of samples. These notions have each have their own strengths: the universal version is more general than the existential ones, while existential liftings are known to satisfy more precise composition principles. We propose a novel, existential version of approximate lifting, called $\star$-lifting, and show that it is equivalent to Sato's construction for discrete probability measures. Our work unifies all known notions of approximate lifting, yielding cleaner properties, more general constructions, and more precise composition theorems for both styles of lifting, enabling richer proofs of differential privacy. We also clarify the relation between existing definitions of approximate lifting, and consider more general approximate liftings based on $f$-divergences.
  • We study rewritability of monadic disjunctive Datalog programs, (the complements of) MMSNP sentences, and ontology-mediated queries (OMQs) based on expressive description logics of the ALC family and on conjunctive queries. We show that rewritability into FO and into monadic Datalog (MDLog) are decidable, and that rewritability into Datalog is decidable when the original query satisfies a certain condition related to equality. We establish 2NExpTime-completeness for all studied problems except rewritability into MDLog for which there remains a gap between 2NExpTime and 3ExpTime. We also analyze the shape of rewritings, which in the MMSNP case correspond to obstructions, and give a new construction of canonical Datalog programs that is more elementary than existing ones and also applies to formulas with free variables.
  • The present paper gives a generalization of cartesian closed categories, called cartesian closed categories with dependence, whose strict version induces categories with families that support 1-, Sigma- and Pi-types in the strict sense. Consequently, we have obtained a new semantics of dependent type theories that is both categorical and true-to-syntax.
  • We introduce the notion of feedback computable functions from $2^\omega$ to $2^\omega$, extending feedback Turing computation in analogy with the standard notion of computability for functions from $2^\omega$ to $2^\omega$. We then show that the feedback computable functions are precisely the effectively Borel functions. With this as motivation we define the notion of a feedback computable function on a structure, independent of any coding of the structure as a real. We show that this notion is absolute, and as an example characterize those functions that are computable from a Gandy ordinal with some finite subset distinguished.
  • We carry out a proof theoretic analysis of the wellfoundedness of recursive path orders in an abstract setting. We outline a very general termination principle and extract from its wellfoundedness proof subrecursive bounds on the size of derivation trees which can be defined in G\"{o}del's system T plus bar recursion. We then carry out a complexity analysis of these terms, and demonstrate how this can be applied to bound the derivational complexity of term rewrite systems.
  • Unambiguous automata are nondeterministic automata in which every word has at most one accepting run. In this paper we give a polynomial-time algorithm for model checking discrete-time Markov chains against $\omega$-regular specifications represented as unambiguous automata. We furthermore show that the complexity of this model checking problem lies in NC: the subclass of P comprising those problems solvable in poly-logarithmic parallel time. These complexity bounds match the known bounds for model checking Markov chains against specifications given as deterministic automata, notwithstanding the fact that unambiguous automata can be exponentially more succinct than deterministic automata. We report on an implementation of our procedure, including an experiment in which the implementation is used to model check LTL formulas on Markov chains.