• Recent developments in formal verification have identified approximate liftings (also known as approximate couplings) as a clean, compositional abstraction for proving differential privacy. This construction can be defined in two styles. Earlier definitions require the existence of one or more witness distributions, while a recent definition by Sato uses universal quantification over all sets of samples. These notions have each have their own strengths: the universal version is more general than the existential ones, while existential liftings are known to satisfy more precise composition principles. We propose a novel, existential version of approximate lifting, called $\star$-lifting, and show that it is equivalent to Sato's construction for discrete probability measures. Our work unifies all known notions of approximate lifting, yielding cleaner properties, more general constructions, and more precise composition theorems for both styles of lifting, enabling richer proofs of differential privacy. We also clarify the relation between existing definitions of approximate lifting, and consider more general approximate liftings based on $f$-divergences.
  • Data sharing among partners---users, organizations, companies---is crucial for the advancement of data analytics in many domains. Sharing through secure computation and differential privacy allows these partners to perform private computations on their sensitive data in controlled ways. However, in reality, there exist complex relationships among members. Politics, regulations, interest, trust, data demands and needs are one of the many reasons. Thus, there is a need for a mechanism to meet these conflicting relationships on data sharing. This paper presents Curie, an approach to exchange data among members whose membership has complex relationships. The CPL policy language that allows members to define the specifications of data exchange requirements is introduced. Members (partners) assert who and what to exchange through their local policies and negotiate a global sharing agreement. The agreement is implemented in a multi-party computation that guarantees sharing among members will comply with the policy as negotiated. The use of Curie is validated through an example of a health care application built on recently introduced secure multi-party computation and differential privacy frameworks, and policy and performance trade-offs are explored.
  • Structure editors allow programmers to edit the tree structure of a program directly. This can have cognitive benefits, particularly for novice and end-user programmers. It also simplifies matters for tool designers, because they do not need to contend with malformed program text. This paper defines Hazelnut, a structure editor based on a small bidirectionally typed lambda calculus extended with holes and a cursor. Hazelnut goes one step beyond syntactic well-formedness: its edit actions operate over statically meaningful incomplete terms. Naively, this would force the programmer to construct terms in a rigid "outside-in" manner. To avoid this problem, the action semantics automatically places terms assigned a type that is inconsistent with the expected type inside a hole. This safely defers the type consistency check until the term inside the hole is finished. Hazelnut is a foundational type-theoretic account of typed structure editing, rather than an end-user tool itself. To that end, we describe how Hazelnut's rich metatheory, which we have mechanized in Agda, guides the definition of an extension to the calculus. We also discuss various plausible evaluation strategies for terms with holes, and in so doing reveal connections with gradual typing and contextual modal type theory, the Curry-Howard interpretation of contextual modal logic. Finally, we discuss how Hazelnut's semantics lends itself to implementation as a functional reactive program. Our reference implementation is written using js_of_ocaml.
  • This paper describes the application of a high-level language and method in developing simpler specifications of more complex variants of the Paxos algorithm for distributed consensus. The specifications are for Multi-Paxos with preemption, replicated state machine, and reconfiguration and optimized with state reduction and failure detection. The language is DistAlgo. The key is to express complex control flows and synchronization conditions precisely at a high level, using nondeterministic waits and message-history queries. We obtain complete executable specifications that are almost completely declarative---updating only a number for the protocol round besides the sets of messages sent and received. We show the following results: 1.English and pseudocode descriptions of distributed algorithms can be captured completely and precisely at a high level, without adding, removing, or reformulating algorithm details to fit lower-level, more abstract, or less direct languages. 2.We created higher-level control flows and synchronization conditions than all previous specifications, and obtained specifications that are much simpler and smaller, even matching or smaller than abstract specifications that omit many algorithm details. 3.The simpler specifications led us to easily discover useless replies, unnecessary delays, and liveness violations (if messages can be lost) in previous published specifications, by just following the simplified algorithm flows. 4.The resulting specifications can be executed directly, and we can express optimizations cleanly, yielding drastic performance improvement over naive execution and facilitating a general method for merging processes. 5.We systematically translated the resulting specifications into TLA+ and developed machine-checked safety proofs, which also allowed us to detect and fix a subtle safety violation in an earlier unpublished specification.
  • We present a new dynamic partial-order reduction method for stateless model checking of concurrent programs. A common approach for exploring program behaviors relies on enumerating the traces of the program, without storing the visited states (aka stateless exploration). As the number of distinct traces grows exponentially, dynamic partial-order reduction (DPOR) techniques have been successfully used to partition the space of traces into equivalence classes (Mazurkiewicz partitioning), with the goal of exploring only few representative traces from each class. We introduce a new equivalence on traces under sequential consistency semantics, which we call the observation equivalence. Two traces are observationally equivalent if every read event observes the same write event in both traces. While the traditional Mazurkiewicz equivalence is control-centric, our new definition is data-centric. We show that our observation equivalence is coarser than the Mazurkiewicz equivalence, and in many cases even exponentially coarser. We devise a DPOR exploration of the trace space, called data-centric DPOR, based on the observation equivalence. For acyclic architectures, our algorithm is guaranteed to explore exactly one representative trace from each observation class, while spending polynomial time per class. Hence, our algorithm is optimal wrt the observation equivalence, and in several cases explores exponentially fewer traces than any enumerative method based on the Mazurkiewicz equivalence. For cyclic architectures, we consider an equivalence between traces which is finer than the observation equivalence; but coarser than the Mazurkiewicz equivalence, and in some cases is exponentially coarser. Our data-centric DPOR algorithm remains optimal under this trace equivalence.
  • We propose an under-approximate reachability analysis algorithm for programs running under the POWER memory model, in the spirit of the work on context-bounded analysis intitiated by Qadeer et al. in 2005 for detecting bugs in concurrent programs (supposed to be running under the classical SC model). To that end, we first introduce a new notion of context-bounding that is suitable for reasoning about computations under POWER, which generalizes the one defined by Atig et al. in 2011 for the TSO memory model. Then, we provide a polynomial size reduction of the context-bounded state reachability problem under POWER to the same problem under SC: Given an input concurrent program P, our method produces a concurrent program P' such that, for a fixed number of context switches, running P' under SC yields the same set of reachable states as running P under POWER. The generated program P' contains the same number of processes as P, and operates on the same data domain. By leveraging the standard model checker CBMC, we have implemented a prototype tool and applied it on a set of benchmarks, showing the feasibility of our approach.
  • Diverse selection statements -- if-then-else, switch and try-catch -- are commonly used in modern programming languages. To make things simple, we propose a unifying statement for selection. This statement is of the form seqor(G_1,...,G_n) where each $G_i$ is a statement. It has a a simple semantics: sequentially choose the first successful statement $G_i$ and then proceeds with executing $G_i$. Examples will be provided for this statement.
  • To model relaxed memory, we propose confusion-free event structures over an alphabet with a justification relation. Executions are modeled by justified configurations, where every read event has a justifying write event. Justification alone is too weak a criterion, since it allows cycles of the kind that result in so-called thin-air reads. Acyclic justification forbids such cycles, but also invalidates event reorderings that result from compiler optimizations and dynamic instruction scheduling. We propose the notion of well-justification, based on a game-like model, which strikes a middle ground. We show that well-justified configurations satisfy the DRF theorem: in any data-race free program, all well-justified configurations are sequentially consistent. We also show that rely-guarantee reasoning is sound for well-justified configurations, but not for justified configurations. For example, well-justified configurations are type-safe. Well-justification allows many, but not all reorderings performed by relaxed memory. In particular, it fails to validate the commutation of independent reads. We discuss variations that may address these shortcomings.
  • We extend functional languages with high-level exception handling. To be specific, we allow sequential-disjunction expressions of the form $E_0 \bigtriangledown E_1$ where $E_0, E_1$ are expressions. These expressions have the following intended semantics: sequentially $choose$ the first successful $E_i$ and evaluate $E_i$ where $i$ = 0 or 1. These expressions thus allow us to specify an expression $E_0$ with the failure-handling (exception handling) routine, i.e., expression $E_1$. We also discuss the class of sequential-conjunction function declarations which is a dual of the former.
  • Static cache analysis characterizes a program's cache behavior by determining in a sound but approximate manner which memory accesses result in cache hits and which result in cache misses. Such information is valuable in optimizing compilers, worst-case execution time analysis, and side-channel attack quantification and mitigation.Cache analysis is usually performed as a combination of `must' and `may' abstract interpretations, classifying instructions as either `always hit', `always miss', or `unknown'. Instructions classified as `unknown' might result in a hit or a miss depending on program inputs or the initial cache state. It is equally possible that they do in fact always hit or always miss, but the cache analysis is too coarse to see it.Our approach to eliminate this uncertainty consists in (i) a novel abstract interpretation able to ascertain that a particular instruction may definitely cause a hit and a miss on different paths, and (ii) an exact analysis, removing all remaining uncertainty, based on model checking, using abstract-interpretation results to prune down the model for scalability.We evaluated our approach on a variety of examples; it notably improves precision upon classical abstract interpretation at reasonable cost.
  • ProbNetKAT is a probabilistic extension of NetKAT with a denotational semantics based on Markov kernels. The language is expressive enough to generate continuous distributions, which raises the question of how to compute effectively in the language. This paper gives an new characterization of ProbNetKAT's semantics using domain theory, which provides the foundation needed to build a practical implementation. We show how to use the semantics to approximate the behavior of arbitrary ProbNetKAT programs using distributions with finite support. We develop a prototype implementation and show how to use it to solve a variety of problems including characterizing the expected congestion induced by different routing schemes and reasoning probabilistically about reachability in a network.
  • We present Low*, a language for low-level programming and verification, and its application to high-assurance optimized cryptographic libraries. Low* is a shallow embedding of a small, sequential, well-behaved subset of C in F*, a dependently-typed variant of ML aimed at program verification. Departing from ML, Low* does not involve any garbage collection or implicit heap allocation; instead, it has a structured memory model \`a la CompCert, and it provides the control required for writing efficient low-level security-critical code. By virtue of typing, any Low* program is memory safe. In addition, the programmer can make full use of the verification power of F* to write high-level specifications and verify the functional correctness of Low* code using a combination of SMT automation and sophisticated manual proofs. At extraction time, specifications and proofs are erased, and the remaining code enjoys a predictable translation to C. We prove that this translation preserves semantics and side-channel resistance. We provide a new compiler back-end from Low* to C and, to evaluate our approach, we implement and verify various cryptographic algorithms, constructions, and tools for a total of about 28,000 lines of code, specification and proof. We show that our Low* code delivers performance competitive with existing (unverified) C cryptographic libraries, suggesting our approach may be applicable to larger-scale low-level software.
  • Bidirectional typechecking, in which terms either synthesize a type or are checked against a known type, has become popular for its applicability to a variety of type systems, its error reporting, and its ease of implementation. Following principles from proof theory, bidirectional typing can be applied to many type constructs. The principles underlying a bidirectional approach to indexed types (generalized algebraic datatypes) are less clear. Building on proof-theoretic treatments of equality, we give a declarative specification of typing based on focalization. This approach permits declarative rules for coverage of pattern matching, as well as support for first-class existential types using a focalized subtyping judgment. We use refinement types to avoid explicitly passing equality proofs in our term syntax, making our calculus similar to languages such as Haskell and OCaml. We also extend the declarative specification with an explicit rules for deducing when a type is principal, permitting us to give a complete declarative specification for a rich type system with significant type inference. We also give a set of algorithmic typing rules, and prove that it is sound and complete with respect to the declarative system. The proof requires a number of technical innovations, including proving soundness and completeness in a mutually recursive fashion.
  • Dataflow matrix machines are self-referential generalized recurrent neural nets. The self-referential mechanism is provided via a stream of matrices defining the connectivity and weights of the network in question. A natural question is: what should play the role of untyped lambda-calculus for this programming architecture? The proposed answer is a discipline of programming with only one kind of streams, namely the streams of appropriately shaped matrices. This yields Pure Dataflow Matrix Machines which are networks of transformers of streams of matrices capable of defining a pure dataflow matrix machine.
  • We consider a programming language based on the lamplighter group that uses only composition and iteration as control structures. We derive generating functions and counting formulas for this language and special subsets of it, establishing lower and upper bounds on the growth rate of semantically distinct programs. Finally, we show how to sample random programs and analyze the distribution of runtimes induced by such sampling.
  • Choreographic Programming is a programming paradigm for building concurrent programs that are deadlock-free by construction, as a result of programming communications declaratively and then synthesising process implementations automatically. Despite strong interest on choreographies, a foundational model that explains which computations can be performed with the hallmark constructs of choreographies is still missing. In this work, we introduce Core Choreographies (CC), a model that includes only the core primitives of choreographic programming. Every computable function can be implemented as a choreography in CC, from which we can synthesise a process implementation where independent computations run in parallel. We discuss the design of CC and argue that it constitutes a canonical model for choreographic programming.
  • We present a new approach for building source-to-source transformations that can run on multiple programming languages, based on a new way of representing programs called incremental parametric syntax. We implement this approach in Haskell in our Cubix system, and construct incremental parametric syntaxes for C, Java, JavaScript, Lua, and Python. We demonstrate a whole-program refactoring tool that runs on all of them, along with three smaller transformations that each run on several. Our evaluation shows that (1) once a transformation is written, little work is required to configure it for a new language (2) transformations built this way output readable code which preserve the structure of the original, according to participants in our human study, and (3) our transformations can still handle language corner-cases, as validated on compiler test suites.
  • The memory model for RISC-V, a newly developed open source ISA, has not been finalized yet and thus, offers an opportunity to evaluate existing memory models. We believe RISC-V should not adopt the memory models of POWER or ARM, because their axiomatic and operational definitions are too complicated. We propose two new weak memory models: WMM and WMM-S, which balance definitional simplicity and implementation flexibility differently. Both allow all instruction reorderings except overtaking of loads by a store. We show that this restriction has little impact on performance and it considerably simplifies operational definitions. It also rules out the out-of-thin-air problem that plagues many definitions. WMM is simple (it is similar to the Alpha memory model), but it disallows behaviors arising due to shared store buffers and shared write-through caches (which are seen in POWER processors). WMM-S, on the other hand, is more complex and allows these behaviors. We give the operational definitions of both models using Instantaneous Instruction Execution (I2E), which has been used in the definitions of SC and TSO. We also show how both models can be implemented using conventional cache-coherent memory systems and out-of-order processors, and encompasses the behaviors of most known optimizations.
  • Structured reversible flowchart languages is a class of imperative reversible programming languages allowing for a simple diagrammatic representation of control flow built from a limited set of control flow structures. This class includes the reversible programming language Janus (without recursion), as well as more recently developed reversible programming languages such as R-CORE and R-WHILE. In the present paper, we develop a categorical foundation for this class of languages based on inverse categories with joins. We generalize the notion of extensivity of restriction categories to one that may be accommodated by inverse categories, and use the resulting decisions to give a reversible representation of predicates and assertions. This leads to a categorical semantics for structured reversible flowcharts, which we show to be computationally sound and adequate, as well as equationally fully abstract with respect to the operational semantics under certain conditions.
  • Being able to soundly estimate roundoff errors of finite-precision computations is important for many applications in embedded systems and scientific computing. Due to the discrepancy between continuous reals and discrete finite-precision values, automated static analysis tools are highly valuable to estimate roundoff errors. The results, however, are only as correct as the implementations of the static analysis tools. This paper presents a formally verified and modular tool which fully automatically checks the correctness of finite-precision roundoff error bounds encoded in a certificate. We present implementations of certificate generation and checking for both Coq and HOL4 and evaluate it on a number of examples from the literature. The experiments use both in-logic evaluation of Coq and HOL4, and execution of extracted code outside of the logics: we benchmark Coq extracted unverified OCaml code and a CakeML-generated verified binary.
  • Dataflow matrix machines arise naturally in the context of synchronous dataflow programming with linear streams. They can be viewed as a rather powerful generalization of recurrent neural networks. Similarly to recurrent neural networks, large classes of dataflow matrix machines are described by matrices of numbers, and therefore dataflow matrix machines can be synthesized by computing their matrices. At the same time, the evidence is fairly strong that dataflow matrix machines have sufficient expressive power to be a convenient general-purpose programming platform. Because of the network nature of this platform, programming patterns often correspond to patterns of connectivity in the generalized recurrent neural networks understood as programs. This paper explores a variety of such programming patterns.
  • We introduce Dynamic SOS as a framework for describing semantics of programming languages that include dynamic software upgrades, for upgrading software code during run-time. Dynamic SOS (DSOS) is built on top of the Modular SOS of P. Mosses, with an underlying category theory formalization. The idea of Dynamic SOS is to bring out the essential differences between dynamic upgrade constructs and program execution constructs. The important feature of Modular SOS (MSOS) that we exploit in DSOS is the sharp separation of the program execution code from the additional (data) structures needed at run-time. In DSOS we aim to achieve the same modularity and decoupling for dynamic software upgrades. This is partly motivated by the long term goal of having machine-checkable proofs for general results like type safety. We exemplify Dynamic SOS on two languages supporting dynamic software upgrades, namely the C-like Proteus, which supports updating of variables, functions, records, or types at specific program points, and Creol, which supports dynamic class upgrades in the setting of concurrent objects. Existing type analyses for software upgrades can be done on top of DSOS too, as we illustrate for Proteus. As a side result we define of a general encapsulating construction on Modular SOS useful in situations where a form of encapsulation of the execution is needed. We use encapsulation in the Creol setting of concurrent object-oriented programming with active objects and asynchronous method calls.
  • Programming a parallel computing system that consists of several thousands or even up to a million message passing processing units may ask for a language that supports waiting for and sending messages over hardware channels. As programs are looked upon as state machines, the language provides syntax to implement a main event driven loop. The language presented herewith surely will not serve as a generic programming language for any arbitrary task. Its main purpose is to allow for a prototypical implementation of a dynamic software system as a proof of concept.
  • We describe the LoopInvGen tool for generating loop invariants that can provably guarantee correctness of a program with respect to a given specification. LoopInvGen is an efficient implementation of the inference technique originally proposed in our earlier work on PIE (https://doi.org/10.1145/2908080.2908099). In contrast to existing techniques, LoopInvGen is not restricted to a fixed set of features -- atomic predicates that are composed together to build complex loop invariants. Instead, we start with no initial features, and use program synthesis techniques to grow the set on demand. This not only enables a less onerous and more expressive approach, but also appears to be significantly faster than the existing tools over the SyGuS-COMP 2017 benchmarks from the INV track.
  • Modern networks achieve robustness and scalability by maintaining states on their nodes. These nodes are referred to as middleboxes and are essential for network functionality. However, the presence of middleboxes drastically complicates the task of network verification. Previous work showed that the problem is undecidable in general and EXPSPACE-complete when abstracting away the order of packet arrival. We describe a new algorithm for conservatively checking isolation properties of stateful networks. The asymptotic complexity of the algorithm is polynomial in the size of the network, albeit being exponential in the maximal number of queries of the local state that a middlebox can do, which is often small. Our algorithm is sound, i.e., it can never miss a violation of safety but may fail to verify some properties. The algorithm performs on-the fly abstract interpretation by (1) abstracting away the order of packet processing and the number of times each packet arrives, (2) abstracting away correlations between states of different middleboxes and channel contents, and (3) representing middlebox states by their effect on each packet separately, rather than taking into account the entire state space. We show that the abstractions do not lose precision when middleboxes may reset in any state. This is encouraging since many real middleboxes reset, e.g., after some session timeout is reached or due to hardware failure.