• Simulations of single- and multi-species compressible flows with shock waves and discontinuities are conducted using a weighted compact nonlinear scheme (WCNS) with a newly developed sixth order localized dissipative interpolation. In smooth regions, the scheme applies the central nonlinear interpolation with minimum dissipation to well resolve fluctuating flow features while in regions containing discontinuities and high wavenumber features, the scheme suppresses spurious numerical oscillations by hybridizing the central interpolation with the more dissipative upwind-biased nonlinear interpolation. In capturing material interfaces between species of different densities, a quasi-conservative five equation model that can conserve mass of each species is used to prevent pressure oscillations across the interfaces. Compared to upwind-biased interpolations with classical nonlinear weights and improved weights, and the interpolation with adaptive central-upwind weights for scale-separation, it is shown that WCNS with the proposed localized dissipative interpolation has better performance to simultaneously capture discontinuities and resolve smooth features.
  • Mean field electrodynamics (MFE) facilitates practical modeling of secular, large scale properties of astrophysical or laboratory systems with fluctuations.Practitioners commonly assume wide scale separation between mean and fluctuating quantities, to justify equality of ensemble and spatial or temporal averages.Often however, real systems do not exhibit such scale separation. This raises two questions: (I) what are the appropriate generalized equations of MFE in the presence of mesoscale fluctuations? (II) how precise are theoretical predictions from MFE? We address both by first deriving the equations of MFE for different types of averaging, along with mesoscale correction terms that depend on the ratio of averaging scale to variation scale of the mean. We then show that even if these terms are small, predictions of MFE can still have a significant precision error. This error has an intrinsic contribution from the dynamo input parameters and a filtering contribution from differences in the way observations and theory are projected through the measurement kernel.Minimizing the sum of these contributions can produce an optimal scale of averaging that makes the theory maximally precise.The precision error is important to quantify when comparing to observations because it quantifies the resolution of predictive power. We exemplify these principles for galactic dynamos, comment on broader implications, and identify possibilities for further work.
  • This paper exposes how to obtain a relation that have to be hold for all free--divergence velocity fields that evolve according to Navier--Stokes equations. However, checking the violation of this relation requires a huge computational effort. To circumvent this problem it is proposed an additional antsatz to free-divergent Navier--Stokes fields. This makes available six degrees of freedom which can be tuned. When they are tuned adequately, it is possible to find finite $L^2$ norms of the velocity field for volumes of $\mathbb{R}^3$ and for $t\in[t_0,\infty)$. In particular, the kinetic energy of the system is bounded when the field components $u_i$ are class $C^3$ functions on $\mathbb{R}^3\times[t_0,\infty)$ that hold Dirichlet boundary conditions. This additional relation lets us conclude that Navier--Stokes equations with no-slip boundary conditions have not unique solution. Moreover, under a given external force the kinetic energy can be computed exactly as a funtion of time.
  • We theoretically and experimentally investigate low-Reynolds-number propulsion of geometrically achiral planar objects that possess a dipole moment and that are driven by a rotating magnetic field. Symmetry considerations (involving parity, $\widehat{P}$, and charge conjugation, $\widehat{C}$) establish correspondence between propulsive states depending on orientation of the dipolar moment. Although basic symmetry arguments do not forbid individual symmetric objects to efficiently propel due to spontaneous symmetry breaking, they suggest that the average ensemble velocity vanishes. Some additional arguments show, however, that highly symmetrical ($\widehat{P}$-even) objects exhibit no net propulsion while individual less symmetrical ($\widehat{C}\widehat{P}$-even) propellers do propel. Particular magnetization orientation, rendering the shape $\widehat{C}\widehat{P}$-odd, yields unidirectional motion typically associated with chiral structures, such as helices. If instead of a structure with a permanent dipole we consider a polarizable object, some of the arguments have to be modified. For instance, we demonstrate a truly achiral ($\widehat{P}$- and $\widehat{C}\widehat{P}$-even) planar shape with an induced electric dipole that can propel by electro-rotation. We thereby show that chirality is not essential for propulsion due to rotation-translation coupling at low Reynolds number.
  • Faraday waves are a classic example of a system in which an extended pattern emerges under spatially uniform forcing. Motivated by systems in which uniform excitation is not plausible, we study both experimentally and theoretically the effect of heterogeneous forcing on Faraday waves. Our experiments show that vibrations restricted to finite regions lead to the formation of localized subharmonic wave patterns and change the onset of the instability. The prototype model used for the theoretical calculations is the parametrically driven and damped nonlinear Schr\"odinger equation, which is known to describe well Faraday-instability regimes. For an energy injection with a Gaussian spatial profile, we show that the evolution of the envelope of the wave pattern can be reduced to a Weber-equation eigenvalue problem. Our theoretical results provide very good predictions of our experimental observations provided that the decay length scale of the Gaussian profile is much larger than the pattern wavelength.
  • Two different types of perturbations of the Lorenz 63 dynamical system for Rayleigh-B\'enard convection by multiplicative noise -- called stochastic advection by Lie transport (SALT) noise and fluctuation-dissipation (FD) noise -- are found to produce qualitatively different effects. For example, SALT noise preserves the sum of the deterministic Lyapunov exponents at any time, while FD noise does not. In the process of making this comparison between effects of SALT and FD noise on the Lorenz 63 system, a stochastic version of a robust deterministic numerical algorithm for obtaining the individual numerical Lyapunov exponents was developed. With this stochastic version of the algorithm, the value of the sum of the Lyapunov exponents differs from the deterministic value for the FD noise, whereas SALT noise retains this value with high accuracy.
  • Using the Lagrangian transport of momentum, the Reynolds stress can be expressed in terms of basic turbulence parameters. DNS data at higher Reynolds numbers (Re= 1000 and 5200) have been used to again validate this theory, where it is the Lagrangian momentum balance between u2 and pressure fluctuation forces that determine the Reynolds stress at these conditions. This approach can be used to obtain key parameters such as the von Karman constant, inner layer thickness and the Reynolds stress itself. This expression for the Reynolds stress can be combined with RANS for solutions for turbulent channel and jet flows. Examples of these solutions are presented.
  • We study spherically symmetric solutions to the Einstein-Euler equations which model an idealized relativistic neutron star surrounded by vacuum. These are barotropic fluids with a free boundary, governed by an equation of state which sets the speed of sound equal to the speed of light. We demonstrate the existence of a 1-parameter family of static solutions, or ''hard stars,'' and describe their stability properties: First, we show that small stars are a local minimum of the mass energy functional under variations which preserve the total number of particles. In particular, we prove that the second variation of the mass energy functional controls the ''mass aspect function.'' Second, we derive the linearisation of the Euler-Einstein system around small stars in ''comoving coordinates,'' and prove a uniform boundedness statement for an energy, which is exactly at the level of the variational argument. Finally, we exhibit the existence of time periodic solutions to the linearised system, which shows that energy boundedness is optimal for this problem.
  • Temporal or spatial structures are readily extracted from complex data by modal decompositions like Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) or Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD). Subspaces of such decompositions serve as reduced order models and define either spatial structures in time or temporal structures in space. On the contrary, convecting phenomena pose a major problem to those decompositions. A structure traveling with a certain group velocity will be perceived as a plethora of modes in time or space respectively. This manifests itself for example in poorly decaying singular values when using a POD. The poor decay is counter-intuitive, since a single structure is expected to be represented by a few modes. The intuition proves to be correct and we show that in a properly chosen reference frame along the characteristics defined by the group velocity, a POD or DMD reduces moving structures to a few modes, as expected. Beyond serving as a reduced model, the resulting entity can be used to define a constant or minimally changing structure in turbulent flows. This can be interpreted as an empirical counterpart to exact coherent structures. We present the method and its application to a head vortex of a compressible starting jet.
  • Two well-known turbulence models that describe the energy spectrum in the inertial and dissipative ranges simultaneously are by Pao~(1965) and Pope~(2000). In this paper, we compute the energy spectrum $E(k)$ and energy flux $\Pi(k)$ using direct numerical simulations on grids up to $4096^3$, and show consistency between the numerical results and the predictions by the aforementioned models. We also construct a model for laminar flows that predicts $E(k)\sim k^{-1} \exp(-k)$ and $\Pi(k)\sim k \exp(-k)$. Our model predictions match with the numerical results. We emphasize differences on the energy transfers in the two flows---they are {\em local} in the turbulent flows, and {\em nonlocal} in laminar flows.
  • Active particles disturb the fluid around them as force dipoles, or stresslets, which govern their collective dynamics. Unlike swimming speeds, the stresslets of active particles are rarely determined due to the lack of a suitable theoretical framework for arbitrary geometry. We propose a general method, based on the reciprocal theorem of Stokes flows, to compute stresslets as integrals of the velocities on the particle's surface, which we illustrate for spheroidal chemically-active particles. Our method will allow tuning the stresslet of artificial swimmers and tailoring their collective motion in complex environments.
  • A lattice Boltzmann (LB) theory, analytical characteristic integral (ACI) LB theory, is proposed in this paper. ACI LB theory takes Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) Boltzmann equation as the exact kinetic equation behind Navier-Stokes continuum and momentum equations and constructs LB equation by rigorously integrating BGK-Boltzmann equation along characteristics. It's a general theory, supporting most existed LB equations including the standard lattice BGK (LBGK) equation inherited from lattice-gas automata, whose theoretical foundation had been questioned. ACI LB theory also indicates that the characteristic parameter of LB equation is collision number, depicting the particle-interacting intensity in the time span of LB equation, instead of traditionally assumed relaxation time, and the over relaxation time problem is merely a manifestation of temporal evolution of equilibrium distribution along characteristics under high collision number, irrelevant to particle kinetics. In ACI LB theory, the temporal evolution of equilibrium distribution along characteristics is the determinant of LB method accuracy and we numerically prove it.
  • In experiments and numerical simulations we measured angles between the symmetry axes of small spheroids advected in turbulence ("passive directors"). Since turbulent strains tend to align nearby spheroids, one might think that their relative angles are quite small. We show that this intuition fails in general because angles between the symmetry axes of nearby particles are anomalously large. We identify two mechanisms that cause this phenomenon. First, the dynamics evolves to a fractal attractor despite the fact that the fluid velocity is spatially smooth at small scales. Second, this fractal forms steps akin to scar lines observed in the director patterns for random or chaotic two-dimensional maps.
  • Primary instability of the lid-driven flow in a cube is studied by a comprehensive linear stability approach. Two cases, in which the lid moves parallel to the cube sidewall or parallel to the diagonal plane, are considered. The SIMPLE procedure is applied for evaluation of the Krylov vectors needed for application of the Newton and Arnoldi iteration methods. The finite volume grid is gradually refined from 1003 to 2563 nodes. The computations result in the grid convergent values of the critical Reynolds number and oscillation frequency. Patterns of the most unstable perturbation are reported. Finally, some new arguments supporting the assumption that the centrifugal mechanism triggers instability in both cases are given.
  • Thin liquid films are ubiquitous in natural phenomena and technological applications. They have been extensively studied via deterministic hydrodynamic equations, but thermal fluctuations often play a crucial role that needs to be understood. An example of this is dewetting, which involves the rupture of a thin liquid film and the formation of droplets. Such a process is thermally activated and requires fluctuations to be taken into account self-consistently. In this work we present an analytical and numerical study of a stochastic thin-film equation derived from first principles. Following a brief review of the derivation, we scrutinise the behaviour of the equation in the limit of perfectly correlated noise along the wall-normal direction. The stochastic thin-film equation is also simulated by adopting a numerical scheme based on a spectral collocation method. The scheme allows us to explore the fluctuating dynamics of the thin film and the behaviour of its free energy in the vicinity of rupture. Finally, we also study the effect of the noise intensity on the rupture time, which is in agreement with previous works.
  • A solitary wave is generated by impacting a dry chain of beads on one of its ends. Its speed depends on the speed $v_0$ of the striker and the details of the contact force. The time-of-flight (ToF) of the wave was measured as a function of $v_0$, along with the effect of adding a fluid around the contact points. The ToF displays a complex dependence on the fluid's rheological properties not seen in previous works. A power-law dependence of the ToF on $v_0$ in both, dry and wet cases was found. It turned out that the Hertz plus viscoelastic interactions are not enough to account for our results. Two phenomenological models providing a unified and accurate account of our results were developed.
  • We show that in decaying hydromagnetic turbulence with initial kinetic helicity, a weak magnetic field eventually becomes fully helical. The sign of magnetic helicity is opposite to that of the kinetic helicity - regardless of whether or not the initial magnetic field was helical. The magnetic field undergoes inverse cascading with the magnetic energy decaying approximately like t^{-1/2}. This is even slower than in the fully helical case, where it decays like t^{-2/3}. In this parameter range, the product of magnetic energy and correlation length raised to a certain power slightly larger than unity, is approximately constant. This scaling of magnetic energy persists over long time scales. At very late times and for domain sizes large enough to accommodate the growing spatial scales, we expect a cross-over to the t^{-2/3} decay law that is commonly observed for fully helical magnetic fields. Regardless of the presence or absence of initial kinetic helicity, the magnetic field experiences exponential growth during the first few turnover times, which is suggestive of small-scale dynamo action. Our results have applications to a wide range of experimental dynamos and astrophysical time-dependent plasmas, including primordial turbulence in the early universe.
  • The helical absolute equilibrium of a compressible adiabatic flow presents not only the polarization between the two purely helical modes of opposite chiralities but also that between the vortical and acoustic modes, deviating from the equipartition predicted by {\sc Kraichnan, R. H.} [1955 The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America {\bf 27}, 438--441.]. Due to the existence of the acoustic mode, even if all Fourier modes of one chiral sector in the sharpened Helmholtz decomposition [{\sc Moses, H. E.} 1971 SIAM ~(Soc. Ind. Appl. Math.) J. Appl. Math. {\bf 21}, 114--130] are thoroughly truncated, leaving the system with positive definite helicity and energy, negative temperature and the corresponding large-scale concentration of vortical modes are not allowed, unlike the incompressible case.
  • We present an alternative method for determining the sound velocity in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates, based on thermodynamic global variables. The total number of trapped atoms was as a function of temperature carefully studied across the phase transition, at constant volume. It allowed us to evaluate the sound velocity resulting in consistent values from the quantum to classical regime, in good agreement with previous results found in literature. We also provide some insight about the dominant sound mode (thermal or superfluid) across a wide temperature range.
  • We report the results of a direct comparison of a freely expanding turbulent Bose-Einstein condensate and the propagation of an optical speckle pattern. We found remarkably similar statistical properties underlying the spatial propagation of both phenomena. The calculated second-order correlation together with the typical correlation length of each system is used to compare and substantiate our observations. We believe that the close analogy existing in between an expanding turbulent quantum gas and a traveling optical speckle, might burgeon into an exciting new research field investigating disordered quantum matter.
  • We present an analysis of the wind circulation in the vecinity of the ground surface, for a region centered around Guatemala. We used the regional climate model RegCM to simulate the atmospheric dynamics above that region during the full year 2016. The purpose of the study is to obtain the mesoscale variation (tens of kilometers) of the wind velocity field. It can be seen that as resolution is increased, the details in topography are better represented, they in turn influence the wind circulation patterns on scales of a few kilometers. With a fine resolution of 2 km it is possible to confirm the existence of intense wind flux zones over the surface; such as Pal\'in, Escuintla. We are also able to observe diurnally varying circulations, which are the product of the daily cycle of terrain heating due to the sun and the subsecuent cooling during the night. This is the first report in a line of studies where we plan to analyze the climatic features of the Guatemalan region.
  • In this paper, we show that the spatio-temporal evolution of incompressible flows in a long circular pipe can be described by vorticity dynamics. The principal techniques to obtain solutions are similar to those used for flows in the whole space. As the consideration of the Navier-Stokes equations is given in a cylindrical co-ordinates system, two aspects of complication arise. One is the interaction of the velocity components in the radial and azimuthal directions, due to the fictitious centrifugal force in the equations of motion. The rate of the vorticity production at the pipe wall depends on the initial data at entry, and hence is unknown a priori; it must be determined as part of the solution. The vorticity solution obtained defines an intricate flow-field of multitudinous degrees of freedom. As the Reynolds number increases, the analytical solution predicts vorticity-scale proliferations in succession. For sufficiently large initial data, pipe flows are of a turbulent nature. The solution of the governing equations is globally regular and does not bifurcate in space or in time. It is asserted that laminar-turbulent transition is a dynamic process inbred in the non-linearity. The presence of exogenous disturbances, due to imperfect test environments or purpose-made artificial forcing, distorts the course of the intrinsic transition. The flow structures observed by Reynolds (1883) and others can be synthesised and elucidated in light of the current theory.
  • A new approach to modelling the behaviour of simple fluids is presented. Starting from the usual expression of the partition function of N molecules, a Fourier transformation is performed. It is argued that the N(N-1)/2 dynamical variables kpq in the reciprocal space featuring the link between 2 molecules p and q can reasonably be considered independent in the thermodynamical limit. Treated as a set of effective independent particles, their statistical behaviour is analogous to a Bose-Einstein gas. Expressions of the partition function, of the radial pair correlation function and of the pressure are derived, and a special attention is given to the mathematical inter-consistency of those quantities. The results, which are independent of the exact shape of the intermolecular potential, are applied to the simple case of hard sphere fluids. An analytical expression of the radial pair correlation function is derived as well as of the equation of state. The model predicts a qualitatively satisfactory behaviour for g(R), and it provides numerically correct values for the equation of state at low and medium densities, although at higher densities the contact value of g(R)is underestimated. Quite interestingly it predicts for the maximum random close packing density the correct value 0.637 .
  • We demonstrate that numerical solutions of Burgers' equation can be obtained by a scale-totality algorithm for fluids of small viscosity (down to one billionth). Two sets of initial data, modelling simple shears and wall boundary layers, are chosen for our computations. Most of the solutions are carried out well into the fully turbulent regime over finely-resolved scales in space and in time. It is found that an abrupt spatio-temporal concentration in shear constitutes an essential part during the flow evolution. The vorticity surge has been instigated by the non-linearity complying with instantaneous enstrophy production, while ad hoc disturbances play no role in the process. In particular, the present method predicts the precipitous vorticity re-distribution and accumulation, predominantly over localised regions of minute dimension. The growth rate depends on viscosity and is a strong function of initial data. Nevertheless, the long-time energy decay is history-independent and is inversely proportional to time. Our results provide direct evidence of the vorticity proliferation embedded in the equations of motion. The non-linear intensification is a robust feature, and is ultimately responsible for the drastic succession in boundary layer profiles over the intrinsic laminar-turbulent transition (Schubauer and Klebanoff 1955). The dynamical inception of turbulence can be decrypted by solving the full time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations which ascribe no instability stages.
  • The three-dimensional Couette flow between parallel plates is addressed using mixed lattice Boltzmann models which implement the half-range and the full-range Gauss-Hermite quadratures on the Cartesian axes perpendicular and parallel to the walls, respectively. The ability of our models to simulate rarefied flows are validated through comparison against previously reported results obtained using the linearized Boltzmann-BGK equation for values of the Knudsen number (Kn) up to $100$. We find that recovering the non-linear part of the velocity profile (i.e., its deviation from a linear function) at ${\rm Kn} \gtrsim 1$ requires high quadrature orders. We then employ the Shakhov model for the collision term to obtain macroscopic profiles for Maxwell molecules using the standard $\mu \sim T^\omega$ law, as well as for monatomic Helium and Argon gases, modeled through ab-initio potentials, where the viscosity is recovered using the Sutherland model. We validate our implementation by comparison with DSMC results and find excellent match for all macroscopic quantities for ${\rm Kn} \lesssim 0.1$. At ${\rm Kn} \gtrsim 0.1$, small deviations can be seen in the profiles of the diagonal components of the pressure tensor, the heat flux parallel to the plates, and the velocity profile, as well as in the values of the velocity gradient at the channel center. We attribute these deviations to the limited applicability of the Shakhov collision model for highly out of equilibrium flows.