• A special case of Myerson's classic result describes the revenue-optimal equilibrium when a seller offers a single item to a buyer. We study a repeated sales extension of this model: a seller offers to sell a single fresh copy of an item to the same buyer every day via a posted price. The buyer's private value for the item is drawn initially from a publicly known distribution $F$ and remains the same throughout. A key aspect of this game is that the seller might try to learn the buyer's private value to extract more revenue, while the buyer is motivated to hide it. We study the Perfect Bayesian Equilibria (PBE) in this setting with varying levels of commitment power to the seller. We find that the seller having the commitment power to not raise prices subsequent to a purchase significantly improves revenue in a PBE.
  • We study the design of optimal interventions in network games, where individuals' incentives to act are affected by their network neighbors' actions. A planner shapes individuals' incentives, seeking to maximize the group's welfare. We characterize how the planner's intervention depends on the network structure. A key tool is the decomposition of any possible intervention into \emph{principal components}, which are determined by diagonalizing the adjacency matrix of interactions. There is a close connection between the strategic structure of the game and the emphasis of the optimal intervention on various principal components: In games of strategic complements (substitutes), interventions place more weight on the top (bottom) principal components. For large budgets, optimal interventions are \textit{simple} -- targeting a single principal component.
  • Classic cake-cutting algorithms enable people with different preferences to divide among them a heterogeneous resource (``cake''), such that the resulting division is fair according to each agent's individual preferences. However, these algorithms either ignore the geometry of the resource altogether, or assume it is one-dimensional. In practice, it is often required to divide multi-dimensional resources, such as land-estates or advertisement spaces in print or electronic media. In such cases, the geometric shape of the allotted piece is of crucial importance. For example, when building houses or designing advertisements, in order to be useful, the allotments should be squares or rectangles with bounded aspect-ratio. We thus introduce the problem of fair land division --- fair division of a multi-dimensional resource wherein the allocated piece must have a pre-specified geometric shape. We present constructive division algorithms that satisfy the two most prominent fairness criteria, namely envy-freeness and proportionality. In settings where proportionality cannot be achieved due to the geometric constraints, our algorithms provide a partially-proportional division, guaranteeing that the fraction allocated to each agent be at least a certain positive constant. We prove that in many natural settings the envy-freeness requirement is compatible with the best attainable partial-proportionality.
  • Ranking alternatives is a natural way for humans to explain their preferences. It is being used in many settings, such as school choice, course allocations and residency matches. In some cases, several `items' are given to each participant. Without having any information on the underlying cardinal utilities, arguing about fairness of allocation requires extending the ordinal item ranking to ordinal bundle ranking. The most commonly used such extension is stochastic dominance (SD), where a bundle X is preferred over a bundle Y if its score is better according to all additive score functions. SD is a very conservative extension, by which few allocations are necessarily fair while many allocations are possibly fair. We propose to make a natural assumption on the underlying cardinal utilities of the players, namely that the difference between two items at the top is larger than the difference between two items at the bottom. This assumption implies a preference extension which we call diminishing differences (DD), where X is preferred over Y if its score is better according to all additive score functions satisfying the DD assumption. We give a full characterization of allocations that are necessarily-proportional or possibly-proportional according to this assumption. Based on this characterization, we present a polynomial-time algorithm for finding a necessarily-DD-proportional allocation if it exists. Using simulations, we show that with high probability, a necessarily-proportional allocation does not exist but a necessarily-DD-proportional allocation exists, and moreover, that allocation is proportional according to the underlying cardinal utilities. We also consider chore allocation under the analogous condition --- increasing-differences.
  • Interactive-proof games model the scenario where an honest party interacts with powerful but strategic provers, to elicit from them the correct answer to a computational question. Interactive proofs are increasingly used as a framework to design protocols for computation outsourcing. Existing interactive-proof games largely fall into two categories: either as games of cooperation such as multi-prover interactive proofs and cooperative rational proofs, where the provers work together as a team; or as games of conflict such as refereed games, where the provers directly compete with each other in a zero-sum game. Neither of these extremes truly capture the strategic nature of service providers in outsourcing applications. How to design and analyze non-cooperative interactive proofs is an important open problem. In this paper, we introduce a mechanism-design approach to define a multi-prover interactive-proof model in which the provers are rational and non-cooperative---they act to maximize their expected utility given others' strategies. We define a strong notion of backwards induction as our solution concept to analyze the resulting extensive-form game with imperfect information. Our protocols provide utility gap guarantees, which are analogous to soundness gap in classic interactive proofs. At a high level, a utility gap of u means that the protocol is robust against provers that may not care about a utility loss of 1/u. We fully characterize the complexity of our proof system under different utility gap guarantees. For example, we show that with a polynomial utility gap, the power of non-cooperative rational interactive proofs is exactly P^NEXP.
  • We consider the problem of designing a revenue-optimal mechanism in the two-item, single-buyer, unit-demand setting when the buyer's valuations, $(z_1, z_2)$, are uniformly distributed in an arbitrary rectangle $[c,c+b_1]\times[c,c+b_2]$ in the positive quadrant. We provide a complete and explicit solution for arbitrary nonnegative values of $(c,b_1,b_2)$. We identify five simple structures, each with at most five (possibly stochastic) menu items, and prove that the optimal mechanism has one of the five structures. We also characterize the optimal mechanism as a function of $b_1, b_2$, and $c$. When $c$ is low, the optimal mechanism is a posted price mechanism with an exclusion region; when $c$ is high, it is a posted price mechanism without an exclusion region. Our results are the first to show the existence of optimal mechanisms with no exclusion region, to the best of our knowledge.
  • We consider the design of a revenue-optimal mechanism when two items are available to be sold to a single buyer whose valuation is uniformly distributed over an arbitrary rectangle $[c_1,c_1+b_1]\times[c_2,c_2+b_2]$ in the positive quadrant. We provide an explicit, complete solution for arbitrary nonnegative values of $(c_1,c_2,b_1,b_2)$. We identify eight simple structures, each with at most $4$ (possibly stochastic) menu items, and prove that the optimal mechanism has one of these eight structures. We also characterize the optimal mechanism as a function of $(c_1,c_2,b_1,b_2)$. The structures indicate that the optimal mechanism involves (a) an interplay of individual sale and a bundle sale when $c_1$ and $c_2$ are low, (b) a bundle sale when $c_1$ and $c_2$ are high, and (c) an individual sale when one of them is high and the other is low. To the best of our knowledge, our results are the first to show the existence of optimal mechanisms with no exclusion region. We further conjecture, based on promising preliminary results, that our methodology can be extended to a wider class of distributions.
  • We study decentralized protection strategies against Susceptible-Infected-Susceptible (SIS) epidemics on networks. We consider a population game framework where nodes choose whether or not to vaccinate themselves, and the epidemic risk is defined as the infection probability at the endemic state of the epidemic under a degree-based mean-field approximation. Motivated by studies in behavioral economics showing that humans perceive probabilities and risks in a nonlinear fashion, we specifically examine the impacts of such misperceptions on the Nash equilibrium protection strategies. We first establish the existence and uniqueness of a threshold equilibrium where nodes with degrees larger than a certain threshold vaccinate. When the vaccination cost is sufficiently high, we show that behavioral biases cause fewer players to vaccinate, and vice versa. We quantify this effect for a class of networks with power-law degree distributions by proving tight bounds on the ratio of equilibrium thresholds under behavioral and true perceptions of probabilities. We further characterize the socially optimal vaccination policy and investigate the inefficiency of Nash equilibrium.
  • Game Theory (GT) has been used with significant success to formulate, and either design or optimize, the operation of many representative communications and networking scenarios. The games in these scenarios involve, as usual, diverse players with conflicting goals. This paper primarily surveys the literature that has applied theoretical games to wireless networks, emphasizing use cases of upcoming Multi-Access Edge Computing (MEC). MEC is relatively new and offers cloud services at the network periphery, aiming to reduce service latency backhaul load, and enhance relevant operational aspects such as Quality of Experience or security. Our presentation of GT is focused on the major challenges imposed by MEC services over the wireless resources. The survey is divided into classical and evolutionary games. Then, our discussion proceeds to more specific aspects which have a considerable impact on the game usefulness, namely: rational vs. evolving strategies, cooperation among players, available game information, the way the game is played (single turn, repeated), the game model evaluation, and how the model results can be applied for both optimizing resource-constrained resources and balancing diverse trade-offs in real edge networking scenarios. Finally, we reflect on lessons learned, highlighting future trends and research directions for applying theoretical model games in upcoming MEC services, considering both network design issues and usage scenarios.
  • In this paper we study several monotonicity axioms in approval-based multi-winner voting rules. We consider monotonicity with respect to the support received by the winners and also monotonicity in the size of the committee. Monotonicity with respect to the support is studied when the set of voters does not change and when new voters enter the election. For each of these two cases we consider a strong and a weak version of the axiom. We observe certain incompatibilities between the monotonicity axioms and well-known representation axioms (extended/proportional justified representation) for the voting rules that we analyze and provide formal proofs of incompatibility between some of these axioms and perfect representation.
  • We provide simple and approximately revenue-optimal mechanisms in the multi-item multi-bidder settings. We unify and improve all previous results, as well as generalize the results to broader cases. In particular, we prove that the better of the following two simple, deterministic and Dominant Strategy Incentive Compatible mechanisms, a sequential posted price mechanism or an anonymous sequential posted price mechanism with entry fee, achieves a constant fraction of the optimal revenue among all randomized, Bayesian Incentive Compatible mechanisms, when buyers' valuations are XOS over independent items. If the buyers' valuations are subadditive over independent items, the approximation factor degrades to $O(\log m)$, where $m$ is the number of items. We obtain our results by first extending the Cai-Devanur-Weinberg duality framework to derive an effective benchmark of the optimal revenue for subadditive bidders, and then analyzing this upper bound with new techniques.
  • Budgets play a significant role in real-world sequential auction markets such as those implemented by Internet companies. To maximize the value provided to auction participants, spending is smoothed across auctions so budgets are used for the best opportunities. This paper considers a smoothing procedure that relies on {\em pacing multipliers}: for each bidder, the platform applies a factor between 0 and 1 that uniformly scales the bids across all auctions. Looking at this process as a game between all bidders, we introduce the notion of {\em pacing equilibrium}, and prove that they are always guaranteed to exist. We demonstrate through examples that a market can have multiple pacing equilibria with large variations in several natural objectives. We go on to show that computing either a social-welfare-maximizing or a revenue-maximizing pacing equilibrium is NP-hard. Finally, we develop a mixed-integer program whose feasible solutions coincide with pacing equilibria, and show that it can be used to find equilibria that optimize several interesting objectives. Using our mixed-integer program, we perform numerical simulations on synthetic auction markets that provide evidence that, in spite of the possibility of equilibrium multiplicity, it occurs very rarely across several families of random instances. We also show that solutions from the mixed-integer program can be used to improve the outcomes achieved in a more realistic adaptive pacing setting.
  • We study an independent best-response dynamics on network games in which the nodes (players) decide to revise their strategies independently with some probability. We provide several bounds on the convergence time to an equilibrium as a function of this probability, the degree of the network, and the potential of the underlying games. These dynamics are somewhat more suitable for distributed environments than the classical better- and best-response dynamics where players revise their strategies "sequentially", i.e., no two players revise their strategies simultaneously.
  • Communities are an important feature of social networks. In fact, it seems that communities are necessary for a social network to be efficient. However, there exist very few formal studies of the actual role of communities in social networks, how they emerge, and how they are structured. The goal of this paper is to propose a mathematical model to study communities in social networks. For this, we consider a particular case of a social network, namely information networks. We assume that there is a population of agents who are interested in obtaining content. Agents differ in the type of content they are interested in. The goal of agents is to form communities in order to maximize their utility for obtaining and producing content. We use this model to characterize the structure of communities that emerge in this setting. While the proposed model is very simple, the obtained results suggest that it indeed is able to capture key properties of information communities.
  • Taobao, as the largest online retail platform in the world, provides billions of online display advertising impressions for millions of advertisers every day. For commercial purposes, the advertisers bid for specific spots and target crowds to compete for business traffic. The platform chooses the most suitable ads to display in tens of milliseconds. Common pricing methods include cost per mille (CPM) and cost per click (CPC). Traditional advertising systems target certain traits of users and ad placements with fixed bids, essentially regarded as coarse-grained matching of bid and traffic quality. However, the fixed bids set by the advertisers competing for different quality requests cannot fully optimize the advertisers' key requirements. Moreover, the platform has to be responsible for the business revenue and user experience. Thus, we proposed a bid optimizing strategy called optimized cost per click (OCPC) which automatically adjusts the bid to achieve finer matching of bid and traffic quality of page view (PV) request granularity. Our approach optimizes advertisers' demands, platform business revenue and user experience and as a whole improves traffic allocation efficiency. We have validated our approach in Taobao display advertising system in production. The online A/B test shows our algorithm yields substantially better results than previous fixed bid manner.
  • We consider a market in which capacity-constrained generators compete in scalar-parameterized supply functions to serve an inelastic demand spread throughout a transmission constrained power network. The market clears according to a locational marginal pricing mechanism, in which the independent system operator (ISO) determines the generators' production quantities to minimize the revealed cost of meeting demand, while ensuring that network transmission and generator capacity constraints are met. Under the stylizing assumption that both the ISO and generators choose their strategies simultaneously, we establish the existence of Nash equilibria for the underlying market, and derive an upper bound on the allocative efficiency loss at Nash equilibrium relative to the socially optimal level. We also characterize an upper bound on the markup of locational marginal prices at Nash equilibrium above their perfectly competitive levels. Of particular relevance to ex ante market power monitoring, these bounds reveal the role of certain market structures---specifically, the \emph{market share} and \emph{residual supply index} of a producer---in predicting the degree to which that producer is able to exercise market power to influence the market outcome to its advantage. Finally, restricting our attention to the simpler setting of a two-node power network, we provide a characterization of market structures under which a Braess-like paradox occurs due to the exercise of market power---that is to say, we provide a necessary and sufficient condition on market structure under which the strengthening of the network's transmission line capacity results in the (counterintuitive) increase in the total cost of generation at Nash equilibrium.
  • This paper considers a class of reinforcement-based learning (namely, perturbed learning automata) and provides a stochastic-stability analysis in repeatedly-played, positive-utility, finite strategic-form games. Prior work in this class of learning dynamics primarily analyzes asymptotic convergence through stochastic approximations, where convergence can be associated with the limit points of an ordinary-differential equation (ODE). However, analyzing global convergence through an ODE-approximation requires the existence of a Lyapunov or a potential function, which naturally restricts the analysis to a fine class of games. To overcome these limitations, this paper introduces an alternative framework for analyzing asymptotic convergence that is based upon an explicit characterization of the invariant probability measure of the induced Markov chain. We further provide a methodology for computing the invariant probability measure in positive-utility games, together with an illustration in the context of coordination games.
  • This paper contains an extensive combinatorial analysis of the single-peaked domain restriction and investigates the likelihood that an election is single-peaked. We provide a very general upper bound result for domain restrictions that can be defined by certain forbidden configurations. This upper bound implies that many domain restrictions (including the single-peaked restriction) are very unlikely to appear in a random election chosen according to the Impartial Culture assumption. For single-peaked elections, this upper bound can be refined and complemented by a lower bound that is asymptotically tight. In addition, we provide exact results for elections with few voters or candidates. Moreover, we consider the P\'{o}lya urn model and the Mallows model and obtain lower bounds showing that single-peakedness is considerably more likely to appear for certain parameterizations.
  • Device-to-Device (D2D) communication is offering smart phone users a choice to share files with each other without communicating with the cellular network. In this paper, we discuss the behaviors of two characters in the D2D data transaction model from an economic point of view: the data buyers who wish to buy a certain quantity of data, as well as the data sellers who wish to sell data through the D2D network. The optimal price and purchasing strategies are analyzed and deduced based on game theory.
  • Approval-preferential voting is problematical since it combines two different kinds of information that could by themselves lead to different choices. This article analyses the problem and studies a new proposal to deal with it. The existing methods are overviewed with special attention to several desirable properties that are not always met. Particular emphasis is made on certain rather unknown views of Condorcet about this subject. The proposed procedure definitely aims for a choice in the spirit of approval voting. However, it still makes use of the preferential information so as to improve the approval one. This is done by means of the path scores, in common to Schulze's method for preferential voting. The resulting method, that we call path-revised approval choice, is shown to enjoy several good properties. In particular, it fulfils in a well-defined sense Condorcet's latest view that a surely good option should prevail over a doubtfully best one.
  • This article considers a two-player strategic game for network routing under link disruptions. Player 1 (defender) routes flow through a network to maximize her value of effective flow while facing transportation costs. Player 2 (attacker) simultaneously disrupts one or more links to maximize her value of lost flow but also faces cost of disrupting links. Linear programming duality in zero-sum games and the Max-Flow Min-Cut Theorem are applied to obtain properties that are satisfied in any Nash equilibrium. A characterization of the support of the equilibrium strategies is provided using graph-theoretic arguments. Finally, conditions under which these results extend to budget-constrained environments are also studied. These results extend the classical minimum cost maximum flow problem and the minimum cut problem to a class of security games on flow networks.
  • This paper develops tools for welfare and revenue analyses of Bayes-Nash equilibria in asymmetric auctions with single-dimensional agents. We employ these tools to derive price of anarchy results for social welfare and revenue. Our approach separates the standard smoothness framework into two distinct parts, isolating the analysis common to any auction from the analysis specific to a given auction. The first part relates a bidder's contribution to welfare in equilibrium to their contribution to welfare in the optimal auction using the price the bidder faces for additional allocation. Intuitively, either an agent's utility and hence contribution to welfare is high, or the price she has to pay for additional allocation is high relative to her value. We call this condition value covering; it holds in every Bayes-Nash equilibrium of any auction. The second part, revenue covering, relates the prices bidders face for additional allocation to the revenue of the auction, using an auction's rules and feasibility constraints. Combining the two parts gives approximation results to the optimal welfare, and, under the right conditions, the optimal revenue. In mechanisms with reserve prices, our welfare results show approximation with respect to the optimal mechanism with the same reserves. As a center-piece result, we analyze the single-item first-price auction with individual monopoly reserves. When each distribution satisfies a regularity condition the auction's revenue is at least a $2e/(e-1) \approx 3.16$ approximation to the revenue of the optimal auction. We also give bounds for matroid auctions with first-price or all-pay semantics, and the generalized first-price position auction. Finally, we give an extension theorem for simultaneous composition, i.e., when multiple auctions are run simultaneously, with single-valued, unit-demand agents.
  • We study linear Fisher markets with satiation. In these markets, sellers have earning limits and buyers have utility limits. Beyond natural applications in economics, these markets arise in the context of maximizing Nash social welfare when allocating indivisible items to agents. In contrast to markets with either earning or utility limits, markets with both limits have not been studied before. They turn out to have fundamentally different properties. In general, the existence of competitive equilibria is not guaranteed. We identify a natural property of markets (termed money clearing) that implies existence. We show that the set of equilibria is not always convex, answering a question of Cole et al. [EC'17]. We design an FPTAS to compute an approximate equilibrium and prove that the problem of computing an exact equilibrium lies in the intersection of complexity classes PLS and PPAD. For a constant number of buyers or goods, we give a polynomial-time algorithm to compute an exact equilibrium. We show how (approximate) equilibria can be rounded and provide the first constant-factor approximation algorithm (with a factor of 2.404) for maximizing Nash social welfare when agents have budget-additive valuations. Finally, we significantly improve the approximation hardness for additive valuations to \sqrt{8/7} > 1.069 (over 1.00008 by Lee [IPL'17]).
  • Recently, Dallal, Neider, and Tabuada studied a generalization of the classical game-theoretic model used in program synthesis, which additionally accounts for unmodeled intermittent disturbances. In this extended framework, one is interested in computing optimally resilient strategies, i.e., strategies that are resilient against as many disturbances as possible. Dallal, Neider, and Tabuada showed how to compute such strategies for safety specifications. In this work, we compute optimally resilient strategies for a much wider range of winning conditions and show that they do not require more memory than winning strategies in the classical model. Our algorithms only have a polynomial overhead in comparison to the ones computing winning strategies. In particular, for parity conditions, optimally resilient strategies are positional and can be computed in quasipolynomial time.
  • In this paper we consider the price of anarchy (PoA) in multi-commodity flows where the latency or delay function on an edge has a heterogeneous dependency on the flow commodities, i.e. when the delay on each link is dependent on the flow of individual commodities, rather than on the aggregate flow. An application of this study is the performance analysis of a network with differentiated traffic that may arise when traffic is prioritized according to some type classification. This study has implications in the debate on net-neutrality. We provide price of anarchy bounds for networks with $k$ (types of) commodities where each link is associated with heterogeneous polynomial delays, i.e. commodity $i$ on edge $e$ faces delay specified by $g_{i1}(e)f^{\theta}_1(e) + g_{i2}(e)f^{\theta}_2(e) + \ldots + g_{ik}(e)f^{\theta}_k(e) + c_i(e), $ where $f_i(e)$ is the flow of the $i$th commodity through edge $e$, $\theta \in {\cal N}$, $g_{i1}(e), g_{i2}(e), \ldots, g_{ik}(e)$ and $c_i(e)$ are nonnegative constants. We consider both atomic and non-atomic flows. For networks with decomposable delay functions where the delay induced by a particular commodity is the same, i.e. delays on edge $e$ are defined by $a_1(e)f_1^\theta(e) + a_2(e)f_2^\theta(e) + \ldots + c(e)$ where $\forall j , \forall e: g_{1j}(e) = g_{2j}(e) = \ldots = a_j(e)$, we show an improved bound on the price of anarchy. Further, we show bounds on the price of anarchy for uniform latency functions where each edge of the network has the same delay function.