• We prove that square-tiled surfaces having fixed combinatorics of horizontal cylinder decomposition and tiled with smaller and smaller squares become asymptotically equidistributed in any ambient linear $GL(\mathbb R)$-invariant suborbifold defined over $\mathbb Q$ in the moduli space of Abelian differentials. Moreover, we prove that the combinatorics of the horizontal and of the vertical decompositions are asymptotically uncorrelated. As a consequence, we prove the existence of an asymptotic distribution for the combinatorics of a "random" interval exchange transformation with integer lengths. We compute explicitly the absolute contribution of square-tiled surfaces having a single horizontal cylinder to the Masur-Veech volume of any ambient stratum of Abelian differentials. The resulting count is particularly simple and efficient in the large genus asymptotics. We conjecture that the corresponding relative contribution is asymptotically of the order $1/d$, where $d$ is the dimension of the stratum, and prove that this conjecture is equivalent to the long-standing conjecture on the large genus asymptotics of the Masur-Veech volumes. We prove, in particular, that the recent results of Chen, M\"oller and Zagier imply that the conjecture holds for the principal stratum of Abelian differentials as the genus tends to infinity. Our result on random interval exchanges with integer lengths allows to make empirical computation of the probability to get a $1$-cylinder pillowcase cover taking a "random" one in a given stratum. We use this technique to derive the approximate values of the Masur-Veech volumes of strata of quadratic differentials of all small dimensions.
  • The Tur\'an function $ex(n,F)$ denotes the maximal number of edges in an $F$-free graph on $n$ vertices. We consider the function $h_F(n,q)$, the minimal number of copies of $F$ in a graph on $n$ vertices with $ex(n,F)+q$ edges. The value of $h_F(n,q)$ has been extensively studied when $F$ is bipartite or colour-critical. In this paper we investigate the simplest remaining graph $F$, namely, two triangles sharing a vertex, and establish the asymptotic value of $h_F(n,q)$ for $q=o(n^2)$.
  • This article proves that an irreducible subfactor planar algebra with a distributive biprojection lattice admits a minimal 2-box projection generating the identity biprojection. It is a generalization (conjectured in 2013) of a theorem of Oystein Ore on distributive intervals of finite groups (1938), and a corollary of a natural subfactor extension of a conjecture of Kenneth S. Brown in algebraic combinatorics (2000). We deduce a link between combinatorics and representations in finite group theory.
  • Let $H$ be a Krull monoid with class group $G$ such that every class contains a prime divisor. Then every nonunit $a \in H$ can be written as a finite product of irreducible elements. If $a=u\_1 \cdot \ldots \cdot u\_k$, with irreducibles $u\_1, \ldots u\_k \in H$, then $k$ is called the length of the factorization and the set $\mathsf L (a)$ of all possible $k$ is called the set of lengths of $a$. It is well-known that the system $\mathcal L (H) = \{\mathsf L (a) \mid a \in H \}$ depends only on the class group $G$. In the present paper we study the inverse question asking whether or not the system $\mathcal L (H)$ is characteristic for the class group. Consider a further Krull monoid $H'$ with class group $G'$ such that every class contains a prime divisor and suppose that $\mathcal L (H) = \mathcal L (H')$. We show that, if one of the groups $G$ and $G'$ is finite and has rank at most two, then $G$ and $G'$ are isomorphic (apart from two well-known pairings).
  • A meander is a topological configuration of a line and a simple closed curve in the plane (or a pair of simple closed curves on the 2-sphere) intersecting transversally. Meanders can be traced back to H. Poincar\'e and naturally appear in various areas of mathematics, theoretical physics and computational biology (in particular, they provide a model of polymer folding). Enumeration of meanders is an important open problem. The number of meanders with 2N crossings grows exponentially when N grows, but the longstanding problem on the precise asymptotics is still out of reach. We show that the situation becomes more tractable if one additionally fixes the topological type (or the total number of minimal arcs) of a meander. Then we are able to derive simple asymptotic formulas for the numbers of meanders as N tends to infinity. We also compute the asymptotic probability of getting a simple closed curve on a sphere by identifying the endpoints of two arc systems (one on each of the two hemispheres) along the common equator. The new tools we bring to bear are based on interpretation of meanders as square-tiled surfaces with one horizontal and one vertical cylinders. The proofs combine recent results on Masur-Veech volumes of the moduli spaces of meromorphic quadratic differentials in genus zero with our new observation that horizontal and vertical separatrix diagrams of integer quadratic differentials are asymptotically uncorrelated. The additional combinatorial constraints we impose in this article yield explicit polynomial asymptotics.
  • We show that if a graph $G$ with $n \geq 3$ vertices can be drawn in the plane such that each of its edges is involved in at most four crossings, then $G$ has at most $6n-12$ edges. This settles a conjecture of Pach, Radoi\v{c}i\'{c}, Tardos, and T\'oth, and yields a better bound for the famous Crossing Lemma: The crossing number, $\mbox{cr}(G)$, of a (not too sparse) graph $G$ with $n$ vertices and $m$ edges is at least $c\frac{m^3}{n^2}$, where $c > 1/29$. This bound is known to be tight, apart from the constant $c$ for which the previous best lower bound was $1/31.1$. As another corollary we obtain some progress on the Albertson conjecture: Albertson conjectured that if the chromatic number of a graph $G$ is $r$, then $\mbox{cr}(G) \geq \mbox{cr}(K_r)$. This was verified by Albertson, Cranston, and Fox for $r \leq 12$, and for $r \leq 16$ by Bar\'at and T\'oth. Our results imply that Albertson conjecture holds for $r \leq 18$.
  • We prove Union- Closed sets conjecture.
  • We show that there is a binary subspace code of constant dimension 3 in ambient dimension 7, having minimum distance 4 and cardinality 333, i.e., $333 \le A_2(7,4;3)$, which improves the previous best known lower bound of 329. Moreover, if a code with these parameters has at least 333 elements, its automorphism group is in one of $31$ conjugacy classes. This is achieved by a more general technique for an exhaustive search in a finite group that does not depend on the enumeration of all subgroups.
  • A simple method for transmitting quantum states within a quantum computer is via a quantum spin chain---that is, a path on $n$ vertices. Unweighted paths are of limited use, and so a natural generalization is to consider weighted paths; this has been further generalized to allow for loops (\emph{potentials} in the physics literature). We study the particularly important situation of perfect state transfer with respect to the corresponding adjacency matrix or Laplacian through the use of orthogonal polynomials. Low-dimensional examples are given in detail. Our main result is that PST with respect to the Laplacian matrix cannot occur for weighted paths on $n\geq 3$ vertices nor can it occur for certain symmetric weighted trees. The methods used lead us to a conjecture directly linking the rationality of the weights of weighted paths on $n>3$ vertices, with or without loops, with the capacity for PST between the end vertices with respect to the adjacency matrix.
  • A decomposition of a non-empty simple graph $G$ is a pair $[G,P]$, such that $P$ is a set of non-empty induced subgraphs of $G$, and every edge of $G$ belongs to exactly one subgraph in $P$. The chromatic index $\chi'([G,P])$ of a decomposition $[G,P]$ is the smallest number $k$ for which there exists a $k$-coloring of the elements of $P$ in such a way that: for every element of $P$ all of its edges have the same color, and if two members of $P$ share at least one vertex, then they have different colors. A long standing conjecture of Erd\H{o}s-Faber-Lov\'asz states that every decomposition $[K_n,P]$ of the complete graph $K_n$ satisfies $\chi'([K_n,P])\leq n$. In this paper we work with geometric graphs, and inspired by this formulation of the conjecture, we introduce the concept of chromatic index of a decomposition of the complete geometric graph. We present bounds for the chromatic index of several types of decompositions when the vertices of the graph are in general position. We also consider the particular case in which the vertices are in convex position and present bounds for the chromatic index of a few types of decompositions.
  • In this paper we introduce and study discrete analogues of Lebesgue and Hausdorff dimensions for graphs. It turned out that they are closely related to well-known graph characteristics such as rank dimension and Prague (or Ne\v{s}et\v{r}il-R\"odl) dimension. It allows us to formally define fractal graphs and establish fractality of some graph classes. We show, how Hausdorff dimension of graphs is related to their Kolmogorov complexity. We also demonstrate fruitfulness of this interdisciplinary approach by discovering a novel property of general compact metric spaces using ideas from hypergraphs theory and by proving an estimation for Prague dimension of almost all graphs using methods from algorithmic information theory.
  • This paper proposes a method to reduce noise in acyclic sensor networks enumerating targets using the integral theory with respect to Euler characteristic. For an acyclic network (a partially ordered set) equipped with sensors detecting targets, we find reducible points for enumerating targets, as a generalization of weak beat points (homotopically reducible points). This theory is useful for improving the reliability and optimization of acyclic sensor networks.
  • This paper presents a combinatorial analog of topological complexity for finite spaces. We demonstrate that this coincides with the genuine topological complexity of the original finite space, and constitutes an upper bound for the topological complexity of its order complex.
  • Let $\mathcal{P}({\bf N})$ be the power set of ${\bf N}$. We say that a function $\mu^\ast: \mathcal{P}({\bf N}) \to \bf R$ is an upper density if, for all $X,Y\subseteq{\bf N}$ and $h, k\in{\bf N}^+$, the following hold: (F1) $\mu^\ast({\bf N}) = 1$; (F2) $\mu^\ast(X) \le \mu^\ast(Y)$ if $X \subseteq Y$; (F3) $\mu^\ast(X \cup Y) \le \mu^\ast(X) + \mu^\ast(Y)$; (F4) $\mu^\ast(k\cdot X) = \frac{1}{k} \mu^\ast(X)$, where $k \cdot X:=\{kx: x \in X\}$; (F5) $\mu^\ast(X + h) = \mu^\ast(X)$. We show that the upper asymptotic, upper logarithmic, upper Banach, upper Buck, upper Polya, and upper analytic densities, together with all upper $\alpha$-densities (with $\alpha$ a real parameter $\ge -1$), are upper densities in the sense of our definition. Moreover, we establish the mutual independence of axioms (F1)-(F5), and we investigate various properties of upper densities (and related functions) under the assumption that (F2) is replaced by the weaker condition that $\mu^\ast(X)\le 1$ for every $X\subseteq{\bf N}$. Overall, this allows us to extend and generalize results so far independently derived for some of the classical upper densities mentioned above, thus introducing a certain amount of unification into the theory.
  • We use group schemes to construct optimal packings of lines through the origin. In this setting, optimal line packings are naturally characterized using representation theory, which in turn leads to a necessary integrality condition for the existence of equiangular central group frames. We conclude with an infinite family of optimal line packings using the group schemes associated with certain Suzuki 2-groups, specifically, extensions of Heisenberg groups. Notably, this is the first known infinite family of equiangular tight frames generated by representations of nonabelian groups.
  • This article investigates emergence and complexity in complex systems that can share information on a network. To this end, we use a theoretical approach from information theory, computability theory, and complex networks. One key studied question is how much emergent complexity (or information) arises when a population of computable systems is networked compared with when this population is isolated. First, we define a general model for networked theoretical machines, which we call algorithmic networks. Then, we narrow our scope to investigate algorithmic networks that optimize the average fitnesses of nodes in a scenario in which each node imitates the fittest neighbor and the randomly generated population is networked by a time-varying graph. We show that there are graph-topological conditions that cause these algorithmic networks to have the property of expected emergent open-endedness for large enough populations. In other words, the expected emergent algorithmic complexity of a node tends to infinity as the population size tends to infinity. Given a dynamic network, we show that these conditions imply the existence of a central time to trigger expected emergent open-endedness. Moreover, we show that networks with small diameter compared to the network size meet these conditions. We also discuss future research based on how our results are related to some problems in network science, information theory, computability theory, distributed computing, game theory, evolutionary biology, and synergy in complex systems.
  • We investigate extremal graphs related to the game of Cops and Robbers. We focus on graphs where a single cop can catch the robber; such graphs are called cop-win. The capture time of a cop-win graph is the minimum number of moves the cop needs to capture the robber. We consider graphs that are extremal with respect to capture time, i.e. their capture time is as large as possible given their order. We give a new characterization of the set of extremal graphs. For our alternative approach we assign a rank to each vertex of a graph, and then study which configurations of ranks are possible. We partially determine which configurations are possible, enough to prove some further extremal results. We leave a full classification as an open question.
  • A sorting network is a geodesic path from $12 \cdots n$ to $n \cdots 21$ in the Cayley graph of $S_n$ generated by adjacent transpositions. For a uniformly random sorting network, we establish the existence of a local limit of the process of space-time locations of transpositions in a neighbourhood of $an$ for $a\in[0,1]$ as $n\to\infty$. Here time is scaled by a factor of $1/n$ and space is not scaled. The limit is a swap process $U$ on $\mathbb{Z}$. We show that $U$ is stationary and mixing with respect to the spatial shift and has time-stationary increments. Moreover, the only dependence on $a$ is through time scaling by a factor of $\sqrt{a(1-a)}$. To establish the existence of $U$, we find a local limit for staircase-shaped Young tableaux. These Young tableaux are related to sorting networks through a bijection of Edelman and Greene.
  • The blow-up lemma states that a system of super-regular pairs contains all bounded degree spanning graphs as subgraphs that embed into a corresponding system of complete pairs. This lemma has far-reaching applications in extremal combinatorics. We prove sparse analogues of the blow-up lemma for subgraphs of random and of pseudorandom graphs. Our main results are the following three sparse versions of the blow-up lemma: one for embedding spanning graphs with maximum degree $\Delta$ in subgraphs of $G(n,p)$ with $p=C(\log n/n)^{1/\Delta}$; one for embedding spanning graphs with maximum degree $\Delta$ and degeneracy $D$ in subgraphs of $G(n,p)$ with $p=C_\Delta\big(\log n/n\big)^{1/(2D+1)}$; and one for embedding spanning graphs with maximum degree $\Delta$ in $(p,cp^{\max(4,(3\Delta+1)/2)}n)$-bijumbled graphs. We also consider various applications of these lemmas.
  • A graph $G$ is almost hypohamiltonian (a.h.) if $G$ is non-hamiltonian, there exists a vertex $w$ in $G$ such that $G - w$ is non-hamiltonian, and $G - v$ is hamiltonian for every vertex $v \ne w$ in $G$. The second author asked in [J. Graph Theory 79 (2015) 63--81] for all orders for which a.h. graphs exist. Here we solve this problem. To this end, we present a specialised algorithm which generates complete sets of a.h. graphs for various orders. Furthermore, we show that the smallest cubic a.h. graphs have order 26. We provide a lower bound for the order of the smallest planar a.h. graph and improve the upper bound for the order of the smallest planar a.h. graph containing a cubic vertex. We also determine the smallest planar a.h. graphs of girth 5, both in the general and cubic case. Finally, we extend a result of Steffen on snarks and improve two bounds on longest paths and longest cycles in polyhedral graphs due to Jooyandeh, McKay, {\"O}sterg{\aa}rd, Pettersson, and the second author.
  • Recalling each edge of a graph $H$ has 2 oppositely oriented arcs, each vertex $v$ of $H$ is identified with the set of arcs, denoted $(v,e)$, departing from $v$ along the edges $e$ of $H$ incident to $v$. Let $H$ be a $(\lambda,\mu)$-biregular graph with vertex parts $Y$ and $X$, where $|Y|$, resp. $|X|$, is a multiple of the positive integer $\mu$, resp. $\lambda$ ($\ne\mu$). We consider the problem, for each edge $e=yx$ in $H$, of assigning, a {\it color} (given by an element) of $\Z_\lambda$, resp. $\Z_\mu$, to the arc $(y,e)$, resp. $(x,e)$, so that each such color is assigned exactly once in the set of arcs departing from each vertex of $H$. Furthermore, we set such assignment to fulfill a specific bicolor weight function over a monotonic subset of $\Z_\lambda\times \Z_\mu$. This problem applies to the Design of Experiments for Industrial Chemistry, Molecular Biology, Cellular Neuroscience, etc. Four constructions of such arc colorings are presented: an algorithmic one based on pairs of cyclic groups, and 3 essentially different ones based on the vertices and 5-cycles of the Petersen graph. Each of these 3 constructions applies to assembling the Great Circle Challenge Puzzle.
  • Graphons are analytic objects associated with convergent sequences of graphs. Problems from extremal combinatorics and theoretical computer science led to a study of graphons determined by finitely many subgraph densities, which are referred to as finitely forcible. Following the intuition that such graphons should have finitary structure, Lovasz and Szegedy conjectured that the topological space of typical vertices of a finitely forcible graphon is always compact. We disprove the conjecture by constructing a finitely forcible graphon such that the associated space is not compact. The construction method gives a general framework for constructing finitely forcible graphons with non-trivial properties.
  • We prove a general normal approximation theorem for local graph statistics in the configuration model, together with an explicit bound on the error in the approximation with respect to the Wasserstein metric. Such statistics take the form $T := \sum_{v \in V} H_v$, where $V$ is the vertex set, and $H_v$ depends on a neighbourhood in the graph around $v$ of size at most $\ell$. The error bound is expressed in terms of $\ell$, $|V|$, an almost sure bound on $H_v$, the maximum vertex degree $d_{\max}$ and the variance of $T$. Under suitable assumptions on the convergence of the empirical degree distributions to a limiting distribution, we deduce that the size of the giant component in the configuration model has asymptotically Gaussian fluctuations.
  • Let $G$ be an edge-colored graph. We use $e(G)$ and $c(G)$ to denote the number of edges of $G$ and the number of colors appearing on $E(G)$, respectively. For a vertex $v\in V(G)$, the \emph{color neighborhood} of $v$ is defined as the set of colors assigned to the edges incident to $v$. A subgraph of $G$ is \emph{rainbow} if all of its edges are assigned with distinct colors. The well-known Mantel's theorem states that a graph $G$ on $n$ vertices contains a triangle if $e(G)\geq\lfloor\frac{n^2}{4}\rfloor+1$. Rademacher (1941) showed that $G$ contains at least $\lfloor\frac{n}{2}\rfloor$ triangles under the same condition. Li, Ning, Xu and Zhang (2014) proved a rainbow version of Mantel's theorem: An edge-colored graph $G$ has a rainbow triangle if $e(G)+c(G)\geq n(n+1)/2$. In this paper, we first characterize all graphs $G$ satisfying $e(G)+c(G)\geq n(n+1)/2-1$ but containing no rainbow triangles. Motivated by Rademacher's theorem, we then characterize all graphs $G$ which satisfy $e(G)+c(G)\geq n(n+1)/2$ but contain only one rainbow triangle. We further obtain two results on color neighborhood conditions for the existence of rainbow short cycles. Our results improve a previous theorem due to Broersma, Li, Woeginger, and Zhang (2005). Moreover, we provide a sufficient condition in terms of color neighborhood for the existence of a specified number of vertex-disjoint rainbow cycles.
  • Let $\chi_l(G)$ denote the list chromatic number of the $r$-uniform hypergraph~$G$. Extending a result of Alon for graphs, Saxton and the second author used the method of containers to prove that, if $G$ is simple and $d$-regular, then $\chi_l(G)\ge (1/(r-1)+o(1))\log_r d$. To see how close this inequality is to best possible, we examine $\chi_l(G)$ when $G$ is a random $r$-partite hypergraph with $n$ vertices in each class. The value when $r=2$ was determined by Alon and Krivelevich, here we show that $\chi_l(G)= (g(r,\alpha)+o(1))\log_r d$ almost surely, where $d$ is the expected average degree of~$G$ and $\alpha=\log_nd$. The function $g(r,\alpha)$ is defined in terms of "preference orders" and can be determined fairly explicitly. This is enough to show that the container method gives an optimal lower bound on $\chi_l(G)$ for $r=2$ and $r=3$, but, perhaps surprisingly, apparently not for $r\ge4$.