• LaSalle invariance principle was originally proposed in the 1950's and has become a fundamental mathematical tool in the area of dynamical systems and control. In both theoretical research and engineering practice, discrete-time dynamical systems have been at least as extensively studied as continuous-time systems. For example, model predictive control is typically studied in discrete-time via Lyapunov methods. However, there is a peculiar absence in the standard literature of standard treatments of Lyapunov functions and LaSalle invariance principle for discrete-time nonlinear systems. Most of the textbooks on nonlinear dynamical systems focus only on continuous-time systems. In Chapter 1 of the book by LaSalle [11], the author establishes the LaSalle invariance principle for difference equation systems. However, all the useful lemmas in [11] are given in the form of exercises with no proof provided. In this document, we provide the proofs of all the lemmas proposed in [11] that are needed to derive the main theorem on the LaSalle invariance principle for discrete-time dynamical systems. We organize all the materials in a self-contained manner. We first introduce some basic concepts and definitions in Section 1, such as dynamical systems, invariant sets, and limit sets. In Section 2 we present and prove some useful lemmas on the properties of invariant sets and limit sets. Finally, we establish the original LaSalle invariance principle for discrete-time dynamical systems and a simple extension in Section~3. In Section 4, we provide some references on extensions of LaSalle invariance principles for further reading. This document is intended for educational and tutorial purposes and contains lemmas that might be useful as a reference for researchers.
  • We study the problem of decentralized secondary frequency regulation in power networks where ancillary services are provided via on-off load-side participation. We initially consider on-off loads that switch when prescribed frequency thresholds are exceeded, together with a large class of passive continuous dynamics for generation and demand. The considered on-off loads are able to assist existing secondary frequency control mechanisms and return to their nominal operation when the power system is restored to its normal operation, a highly desirable feature which minimizes users disruption. We show that system stability is not compromised despite the switching nature of the loads. However, such control policies are prone to chattering, which limits the practicality of these schemes. As a remedy to this problem, we propose a hysteretic on-off policy where loads switch on and off at different frequency thresholds and show that stability guarantees are retained when the same decentralized passivity conditions for continuous generation and demand hold. Several relevant examples are discussed to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed results. Furthermore, we verify our analytic results with numerical investigations on the Northeast Power Coordinating Council (NPCC) 140-bus system.
  • We study supervisor localization for timed discrete-event systems under partial observation and communication delay in the Brandin-Wonham framework. First, we employ timed relative observability to synthesize a partial-observation monolithic supervisor; the control actions of this supervisor include not only disabling action of prohibitible events (as that of controllable events in the untimed case) but also "clock-preempting" action of forcible events. Accordingly we decompose the supervisor into a set of partial-observation local controllers one for each prohibitible event, as well as a set of partial-observation local preemptors one for each forcible event. We prove that these local controllers and preemptors collectively achieve the same controlled behavior as the partial-observation monolithic supervisor does. Moreover, we propose channel models for inter-agent event communication and impose bounded and unbounded delay as temporal specifications. In this formulation, there exist multiple distinct observable event sets; thus we employ timed relative coobservability to synthesize partial-observation decentralized supervisors, and then localize these supervisors into local controllers and preemptors. The above results are illustrated by a timed workcell example.
  • We study decentralized protection strategies against Susceptible-Infected-Susceptible (SIS) epidemics on networks. We consider a population game framework where nodes choose whether or not to vaccinate themselves, and the epidemic risk is defined as the infection probability at the endemic state of the epidemic under a degree-based mean-field approximation. Motivated by studies in behavioral economics showing that humans perceive probabilities and risks in a nonlinear fashion, we specifically examine the impacts of such misperceptions on the Nash equilibrium protection strategies. We first establish the existence and uniqueness of a threshold equilibrium where nodes with degrees larger than a certain threshold vaccinate. When the vaccination cost is sufficiently high, we show that behavioral biases cause fewer players to vaccinate, and vice versa. We quantify this effect for a class of networks with power-law degree distributions by proving tight bounds on the ratio of equilibrium thresholds under behavioral and true perceptions of probabilities. We further characterize the socially optimal vaccination policy and investigate the inefficiency of Nash equilibrium.
  • This paper studies the need for individualizing vehicular communications in order to improve collision warning systems for an N-lane highway scenario. By relating the traffic-based and communications studies, we aim at reducing highway traffic accidents. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper that shows how to customize vehicular communications to driver's characteristics and traffic information. We propose to develop VANET protocols that selectively identify crash relevant information and customize the communications of that information based on each driver's assigned safety score. In this paper, first, we derive the packet success probability by accounting for multi-user interference, path loss, and fading. Then, by Monte carlo simulations, we demonstrate how appropriate channel access probabilities that satisfy the delay requirements of the safety application result in noticeable performance enhancement.
  • This paper deals with secure state estimation of cyber-physical systems subject to switching (on/off) attack signals and injection of fake packets (via either packet substitution or insertion of extra packets). The random set paradigm is adopted in order to model, via Random Finite Sets (RFSs), the switching nature of both system attacks and the injection of fake measurements. The problem of detecting an attack on the system and jointly estimating its state, possibly in the presence of fake measurements, is then formulated and solved in the Bayesian framework for systems with and without direct feedthrough of the attack input to the output. This leads to the analytical derivation of a hybrid Bernoulli filter (HBF) that updates in real-time the joint posterior density of a Bernoulli attack RFS and of the state vector. A closed-form Gaussian-mixture implementation of the proposed hybrid Bernoulli filter is fully derived in the case of invertible direct feedthrough. Finally, the effectiveness of the developed tools for joint attack detection and secure state estimation is tested on two case-studies concerning a benchmark system for unknown input estimation and a standard IEEE power network application.
  • We propose a framework for inversion-based estimation of certain categories of faults in discrete-time linear systems. The fault signal, as an unknown input, is reconstructed from its projections onto two subspaces. One projection is achieved through an algebraic operation, whereas the other is given by a dynamic filter whose poles coincide with the transmission zeros of the system. A feedback is then introduced to stabilize the above filter as well as to provide an unbiased estimate of the unknown input. Our solution has two distinctive and practical advantages. First, it represents a unified approach to the problem of inversion of both minimum and non-minimum phase systems as well as systems having transmission zeros on the unit circle. Second, the feedback structure makes the proposed scheme robust to noise. We have shown that the proposed inversion filter is unbiased for certain categories of faults. Finally, we have illustrated the performance of our proposed methodologies through numerous simulation studies.
  • This note deals with the boundary control problem of a nonhomogeneous flexible wing evolving under unsteady aerodynamic loads. The wing is actuated at its tip by flaps and is modeled by a distributed parameter system consisting of two coupled partial differential equations. Based on the proposed boundary control law, the well-posedness of the underlying Cauchy problem is first investigated by resorting to the semigroup theory. Then, a Lyapunov-based approach is employed to assess the stability of the closed-loop system in the presence of bounded input disturbances.
  • We propose a solution of the multiple target tracking (MTT) problem based on sets of trajectories and the random finite set framework. A full Bayesian approach to MTT should characterise the distribution of the trajectories given the measurements, as it contains all information about the trajectories. We attain this by considering multi-object density functions in which objects are trajectories. For the standard tracking models, we also describe a conjugate family of multitrajectory density functions.
  • In today's cyber-enabled smart grids, high penetration of uncertain renewables, purposeful manipulation of meter readings, and the need for wide-area situational awareness, call for fast, accurate, and robust power system state estimation. The least-absolute-value (LAV) estimator is known for its robustness relative to the weighted least-squares (WLS) one. However, due to nonconvexity and nonsmoothness, existing LAV solvers based on linear programming are typically slow, hence inadequate for real-time system monitoring. This paper develops two novel algorithms for efficient LAV estimation, which draw from recent advances in composite optimization. The first is a deterministic linear proximal scheme that handles a sequence of convex quadratic problems, each efficiently solvable either via off-the-shelf algorithms or through the alternating direction method of multipliers. Leveraging the sparse connectivity inherent to power networks, the second scheme is stochastic, and updates only \emph{a few} entries of the complex voltage state vector per iteration. In particular, when voltage magnitude and (re)active power flow measurements are used only, this number reduces to one or two, \emph{regardless of} the number of buses in the network. This computational complexity evidently scales well to large-size power systems. Furthermore, by carefully \emph{mini-batching} the voltage and power flow measurements, accelerated implementation of the stochastic iterations becomes possible. The developed algorithms are numerically evaluated using a variety of benchmark power networks. Simulated tests corroborate that improved robustness can be attained at comparable or markedly reduced computation times for medium- or large-size networks relative to the "workhorse" WLS-based Gauss-Newton iterations.
  • OBJECTIVE: We aim to extract and denoise the attended speaker in a noisy, two-speaker acoustic scenario, relying on microphone array recordings from a binaural hearing aid, which are complemented with electroencephalography (EEG) recordings to infer the speaker of interest. METHODS: In this study, we propose a modular processing flow that first extracts the two speech envelopes from the microphone recordings, then selects the attended speech envelope based on the EEG, and finally uses this envelope to inform a multi-channel speech separation and denoising algorithm. RESULTS: Strong suppression of interfering (unattended) speech and background noise is achieved, while the attended speech is preserved. Furthermore, EEG-based auditory attention detection (AAD) is shown to be robust to the use of noisy speech signals. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that AAD-based speaker extraction from microphone array recordings is feasible and robust, even in noisy acoustic environments, and without access to the clean speech signals to perform EEG-based AAD. SIGNIFICANCE: Current research on AAD always assumes the availability of the clean speech signals, which limits the applicability in real settings. We have extended this research to detect the attended speaker even when only microphone recordings with noisy speech mixtures are available. This is an enabling ingredient for new brain-computer interfaces and effective filtering schemes in neuro-steered hearing prostheses. Here, we provide a first proof of concept for EEG-informed attended speaker extraction and denoising.
  • Performing multiple experiments is common when learning internal mechanisms of complex systems. These experiments can include perturbations to parameters or external disturbances. A challenging problem is to efficiently incorporate all collected data simultaneously to infer the underlying dynamic network. This paper addresses the reconstruction of dynamic networks from heterogeneous datasets under the assumption that underlying networks share the same Boolean structure across all experiments. ARMAX models are used as an example to parametrize linear network models, known as "dynamical structure functions" (DSFs), which describe causal interactions between measured variables. Multiple datasets are integrated in one regression problem with additional demands of group sparsity to assure network sparsity and structure consistency. To perform group sparse estimation, we introduce and extend the iterative reweighted l1 method (with ADMM implementation), sparse Bayesian learning and sampling-based methods. Numerical examples illustrate the performance in random tests, which benchmark the proposed methods for stable ARX networks and DSF models. In summary, this paper presents an efficient network reconstruction method that takes advantage of all available data from multiple experiments, rather than processing datasets separately.
  • In this work, we develop an adaptive, multivariate partitioning algorithm for solving mixed-integer nonlinear programs (MINLP) with multi-linear terms to global optimality. This iterative algorithm primarily exploits the advantages of piecewise polyhedral relaxation approaches via disjunctive formulations to solve MINLPs to global optimality in contrast to the conventional spatial branch-and-bound approaches. In order to maintain relatively small-scale mixed-integer linear programs at every iteration of the algorithm, we adaptively partition the variable domains appearing in the multi-linear terms. We also provide proofs on convergence guarantees of the proposed algorithm to a global solution. Further, we discuss a few algorithmic enhancements based on the sequential bound-tightening procedure as a presolve step, where we observe the importance of solving piecewise relaxations compared to basic convex relaxations to speed-up the convergence of the algorithm to global optimality. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our disjunctive formulations and the algorithm on well-known benchmark problems (including Pooling and Blending instances) from MINLPLib and compare with state-of-the-art global optimization solvers. With this novel approach, we solve several large-scale instances which are, in some cases, intractable by the global optimization solver. We also shrink the best known optimality gap for one of the hard, generalized pooling problem instance.
  • In this paper, locally Lipschitz regular functions are utilized to identify and remove infeasible directions from differential inclusions. The resulting reduced differential inclusion is point-wise smaller (in the sense of set containment) than the original differential inclusion. The reduced inclusion is utilized to develop a generalized notion of a derivative in the direction(s) of a set-valued map for locally Lipschitz candidate Lyapunov functions. The developed generalized derivative yields less conservative statements of Lyapunov stability results, invariance-like results, and Matrosov results for differential inclusions. Illustrative examples are included to demonstrate the utility of the developed stability theorems.
  • Resilience has become a key aspect in the design of contemporary infrastructure networks. This comes as a result of ever-increasing loads, limited physical capacity, and fast-growing levels of interconnectedness and complexity due to the recent technological advancements. The problem has motivated a considerable amount of research within the last few years, particularly focused on the dynamical aspects of network flows, complementing more classical static network flow optimization approaches. In this tutorial paper, a class of single-commodity first-order models of dynamical flow networks is considered. A few results recently appeared in the literature and dealing with stability and robustness of dynamical flow networks are gathered and originally presented in a unified framework. In particular, (differential) stability properties of monotone dynamical flow networks are treated in some detail, and the notion of margin of resilience is introduced as a quantitative measure of their robustness. While emphasizing methodological aspects -- including structural properties, such as monotonicity, that enable tractability and scalability -- over the specific applications, connections to well-established road traffic flow models are made.
  • This article considers a two-player strategic game for network routing under link disruptions. Player 1 (defender) routes flow through a network to maximize her value of effective flow while facing transportation costs. Player 2 (attacker) simultaneously disrupts one or more links to maximize her value of lost flow but also faces cost of disrupting links. Linear programming duality in zero-sum games and the Max-Flow Min-Cut Theorem are applied to obtain properties that are satisfied in any Nash equilibrium. A characterization of the support of the equilibrium strategies is provided using graph-theoretic arguments. Finally, conditions under which these results extend to budget-constrained environments are also studied. These results extend the classical minimum cost maximum flow problem and the minimum cut problem to a class of security games on flow networks.
  • We consider the problem of estimating the unobserved amount of photovoltaic (PV) generation and demand in a power distribution network starting from measurements of the aggregated power flow at the point of common coupling (PCC) and local global horizontal irradiance (GHI). The estimation principle relies on modeling the PV generation as a function of the measured GHI, enabling the identification of PV production patterns in the aggregated power flow measurements. Four estimation algorithms are proposed: the first assumes that variability in the aggregated PV generation is given by variations of PV generation, the next two use a model of the demand to improve estimation performance, and the fourth assumes that, in a certain frequency range, the aggregated power flow is dominated by PV generation dynamics. These algorithms leverage irradiance transposition models to explore several azimuth/tilt configurations and explain PV generation patterns from multiple plants with non-uniform installation characteristics. Their estimation performance is compared and validated with measurements from a real-life setup including 4 houses with rooftop PV installations and battery systems for PV self-consumption.
  • Control systems that satisfy temporal logic specifications have become increasingly popular due to their applicability to robotic systems. Existing control methods, however, are computationally demanding, especially when the problem size becomes too large. In this paper, a robust and computationally efficient model predictive control framework for signal temporal logic specifications is proposed. We introduce discrete average space robustness, a novel quantitative semantic for signal temporal logic, that is directly incorporated into the cost function of the model predictive controller. The optimization problem entailed in this framework can be written as a convex quadratic program when no disjunctions are considered and results in a robust satisfaction of the specification. Furthermore, we define the predicate robustness degree as a new robustness notion. Simulations of a multi-agent system subject to complex specifications demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed method.
  • This paper considers the chattering problem of sliding mode control while delay in robot manipulator caused chaos in such electromechanical systems. Fractional calculus as a powerful theorem to produce a novel sliding mode; which has a dynamic essence is used for chattering elimination. To realize the control of a class of chaotic systems in master-slave configuration this novel fractional dynamic sliding mode control scheme is presented and examined on delay based chaotic robot in joint and work space. Also the stability of the closed-loop system is guaranteed by Lyapunov stability theory. Beside these, delayed robot motions are sorted out for qualitative and quantification study. Finally, numerical simulation example illustrates the feasibility of proposed control method.
  • We consider random walks in which the walk originates in one set of nodes and then continues until it reaches one or more nodes in a target set. The time required for the walk to reach the target set is of interest in understanding the convergence of Markov processes, as well as applications in control, machine learning, and social sciences. In this paper, we investigate the computational structure of the random walk times as a function of the set of target nodes, and find that the commute, hitting, and cover times all exhibit submodular structure, even in non-stationary random walks. We provide a unifying proof of this structure by considering each of these times as special cases of stopping times. We generalize our framework to walks in which the transition probabilities and target sets are jointly chosen to minimize the travel times, leading to polynomial-time approximation algorithms for choosing target sets. Our results are validated through numerical study.
  • This paper highlights the significance of the rotor dynamics in control design for small-scale aerobatic helicopters, and proposes two singularity free robust attitude tracking controllers based on the available states for feedback. 1. The first, employs the angular velocity and the flap angle states (a variable that is not easy to measure) and uses a backstepping technique to design a robust compensator (BRC) to \textbf{\textit{actively}} suppress the disturbance induced tracking error. 2. The second exploits the inherent damping present in the helicopter dynamics leading to a structure preserving, \textbf{\textit{passively}} robust controller (SPR), which is free of angular velocity and flap angle feedback. The BRC controller is designed to be robust in the presence of two types of uncertainties: structured and unstructured. The structured disturbance is due to uncertainty in the rotor parameters, and the unstructured perturbation is modeled as an exogenous torque acting on the fuselage. The performance of the controller is demonstrated in the presence of both types of disturbances through numerical simulations. In contrast, the SPR tracking controller is derived such that the tracking error dynamics inherits the natural damping characteristic of the helicopter. The SPR controller is shown to be almost globally asymptotically stable and its performance is evaluated experimentally by performing aggressive flip maneuvers. Throughout the study, a nonlinear coupled rotor-fuselage helicopter model with first order flap dynamics is used.
  • This paper presents a distributed stochastic model predictive control (SMPC) approach for large-scale linear systems with private and common uncertainties in a plug-and-play framework. Using the so-called scenario approach, the centralized SMPC involves formulating a large-scale finite-horizon scenario optimization problem at each sampling time, which is in general computationally demanding, due to the large number of required scenarios. We present two novel ideas in this paper to address this issue. We first develop a technique to decompose the large-scale scenario program into distributed scenario programs that exchange a certain number of scenarios with each other in order to compute local decisions using the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM). We show the exactness of the decomposition with a-priori probabilistic guarantees for the desired level of constraint fulfillment for both uncertainty sources. As our second contribution, we develop an inter-agent soft communication scheme based on a set parametrization technique together with the notion of probabilistically reliable sets to reduce the required communication between the subproblems. We show how to incorporate the probabilistic reliability notion into existing results and provide new guarantees for the desired level of constraint violations. Two different simulation studies of two types of systems interactions, dynamically coupled and coupling constraints, are presented to illustrate the advantages of the proposed framework.
  • The manifold interactions between safety and security aspects makes it plausible to handle safety and security risks in an unified way. The paper develops a corresponding approach based on the discrete event systems (DEVS) paradigm. The simulation-based calculation of an individual system evolution path provides the contribution of this special path of dynamics to the overall risk of running the system. Accidentally and intentionally caused failures are distinguished by the way, in which the risk contributions of the various evolution paths are aggregated to the overall risk. The consistency of the proposed risk assessment method with 'traditional' notions of risk shows its plausibility. Its non-computability, on the other hand, makes the proposed risk assessment better suitable to the IT security domain than other concepts of risk developed for both safety and security. Power grids are discussed as an application example and demonstrates some of the advantages of the proposed method.
  • This paper proposes a control theoretic framework to model and analyze the self-organized pattern formation of molecular concentrations in biomolecular communication networks, emerging applications in synthetic biology. In biomolecular communication networks, bionanomachines, or biological cells, communicate with each other using a cell-to-cell communication mechanism mediated by a diffusible signaling molecule, thereby the dynamics of molecular concentrations are approximately modeled as a reaction-diffusion system with a single diffuser. We first introduce a feedback model representation of the reaction-diffusion system and provide a systematic local stability/instability analysis tool using the root locus of the feedback system. The instability analysis then allows us to analytically derive the conditions for the self-organized spatial pattern formation, or Turing pattern formation, of the bionanomachines. We propose a novel synthetic biocircuit motif called activator-repressor-diffuser system and show that it is one of the minimum biomolecular circuits that admit self-organized patterns over cell population.
  • The control task of tracking a reference pointing direction (the attitude about the pointing direction is irrelevant) while obtaining a desired angular velocity (PDAV) around the pointing direction using geometric techniques is addressed here. Existing geometric controllers developed on the two-sphere only address the tracking of a reference pointing direction while driving the angular velocity about the pointing direction to zero. In this paper a tracking controller on the two-sphere, able to address the PDAV control task, is developed globally in a geometric frame work, to avoid problems related to other attitude representations such as unwinding (quaternions) or singularities (Euler angles). An attitude error function is constructed resulting in a control system with desired tracking performance for rotational maneuvers with large initial attitude/angular velocity errors and the ability to negotiate bounded modeling inaccuracies. The tracking ability of the developed control system is evaluated by comparing its performance with an existing geometric controller on the two-sphere and by numerical simulations, showing improved performance for large initial attitude errors, smooth transitions between desired angular velocities and the ability to negotiate bounded modeling inaccuracies.