• The band structure of an Si inverse diamond structure whose lattice point shape was vacant regular octahedrons, was calculated using plane wave expansion method. A complete photonic band gap was theoretically confirmed at around 0.4 THz. It is said that three-dimensional photonic crystals have no polarization anisotropy in photonic band gap (stop gap, stop band) of high symmetry points in normal incidence. However, it was experimentally confirmed that the polarization orientation of a reflected wave was different from that of an incident wave, [I$(X,Y)$], where $(X,Y)$ is the coordinate system fixed in the photonic crystal. It was studied on a plane (001) at around X point's photonic band gap (0.36 $-$ 0.44 THz) for incident wave direction [001] by rotating a sample in the plane (001), relatively. The polarization orientation of the reflected wave was parallel to that of the incident wave when that of the incident wave was I(1, 1) or I(1, $-$1). In contrast, the former was perpendicular to the latter when that of the incident wave was I(1, 0) or I(0, $-$1) at around 0.38 THz. As far as the photonic crystal in this work is concerned, method of resolution and synthesis of the incident polarization vector is not able to apply to the analyses of rotation of the measured reflected spectra in appearance.
  • We propose a novel ultrafast electronic switching device based on dual-graphene electron waveguides, in analogy to the optical dual-channel waveguide device. The design utilizes the principle of coherent quantum mechanical tunneling of Rabi oscillations between the two graphene electron waveguides. Based on a modified coupled mode theory, we construct a theoretical model to analyse the device characteristics, and predict that the swtiching speed is faster than 1 ps. Due to the long mean free path of electrons in graphene at room temperature, the proposed design avoids the limitation of low temperature operation required in the normal semiconductor quantum-well structure. The layout of the our design is similar to that of a standard CMOS transistor that should be readily fabricated with current state-of-art nanotechnology.
  • Quantum light sources are characterized by their distinctive statistical distribution of photons. For example, single photons and correlated photon pairs exhibit antibunching and reduced variance in the number distribution that is impossible with classical light. Most common realizations of quantum light sources have relied on spontaneous parametric processes such as down-conversion (SPDC) and four-wave mixing (SFWM). These processes are mediated by vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. Therefore, by manipulating the electromagnetic mode structure, for example, using nanophotonic systems, one can engineer the spectrum of generated photons. However, such manipulations are susceptible to fabrication disorders which are ubiquitous in nanophotonic systems and lead to device-to-device variations in the spectrum of generated photons. Here, we demonstrate topologically robust mode engineering of the electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations and implement a nanophotonic quantum light source where the spectrum of generated photons is robust against fabrication disorders. Specifically, we use the topological edge states to achieve an enhanced and robust generation of correlated photon pairs using SFWM and show that they outperform their topologically-trivial counterparts. We demonstrate the non-classical nature of our source using conditional antibunching of photons which confirms that we have realized a robust source of heralded single photons. Such topological effects, which are unique to bosonic systems, could pave the way for the development of robust quantum photonic devices.
  • Along the development of free-electron laser operating at the wavelength of X-ray, the importance of investigation on the radiation has increased. A theoretical simulation is an essential tool for studying existing and proposed experiments. The available simulations preserve net energy conservation over the timestep, upholding causality between the electrons' power and the radiated energy flux. However, according to Wheeler-Feynman time-symmetric theory, the timestep is too short to ensure this. Therefore, the time evolution of electrons and radiation field predicted by the simulations should contradict the correct physics, regardless of whether the stimulated emission dominates over the spontaneous emission or not.
  • A method of data analysis is proposed for the determination of the carrier recombination processes in optically excited matter measured by time-resolved photoluminescence, differentiating monomolecular, bi-molecular, tri-molecular, and higher order molecular processes. Our method allows to determine whether the so-called ABC model describes time evolution of optical relaxation of the excited system. The procedure is applicable to the time evolution of any optically excited medium. As an illustration, the method is successfully applied to III-nitride polar and non-polar multi-quantum wells. We show that in this case the mono- and bi-molecular processes determine the carrier relaxation, and the tri-molecular Auger recombination contribution is negligible.
  • We discuss the progress in integration of nanodiamonds with photonic devices for quantum optics applications. Experimental results in GaP, SiO2 and SiC-nanodiamond platforms show that various regimes of light and matter interaction can be achieved by engineering color center systems through hybrid approaches. We present our recent results on the growth of color center-rich nanodiamond on prefabricated 3C-SiC microdisk resonators. These hybrid devices achieve up to five-fold enhancement of diamond color center light emission and can be employed for integrated quantum photonics.
  • The dark states of a group of two-level atoms in the Tavis-Cummings resonator with zero detuning are considered. In these states, atoms can not emit photons, although they have non-zero energy. They are stable and can serve as a controlled energy reservoir from which photons can be extracted by differentiated effects on atoms, for example, their spatial separation. Dark states are the simplest example of a subspace free of decoherence in the form of a photon flight, and therefore are of interest for quantum computing. It is proved that a) the dimension of the subspace of dark states of atoms is the Catalan numbers, b) in the RWA approximation, any dark state is a linear combination of tensor products of singlet-type states and the ground states of individual atoms. For the exact model, in the case of the same force of interaction of atoms with the field, the same decomposition is true, and only singlets participate in the products and the dark states can neither emit a photon nor absorb it. The proof is based on the method of quantization of the amplitude of states of atomic ensembles, in which the roles of individual atoms are interchangeable. In such an ensemble there is a possibility of micro-causality: the trajectory of each quantum of amplitude can be uniquely assigned.
  • Metamaterials bring sub-wavelength resonating structures together to overcome the limitations of conventional materials. The realization of active metadevices has been an outstanding challenge that requires electrically reconfigurable components operating over a broad spectrum with a wide dynamic range. The existing capability of metamaterials, however, is not sufficient to realize this goal. Here, by integrating passive metamaterials with active graphene devices, we demonstrate a new class of electrically controlled active metadevices working in microwave frequencies. The fabricated active metadevices enable efficient control of both amplitude (> 50 dB) and phase (> 90{\deg}) of electromagnetic waves. In this hybrid system, graphene operates as a tunable Drude metal that controls the radiation of the passive metamaterials. Furthermore, by integrating individually addressable arrays of metadevices, we demonstrate a new class of spatially varying digital metasurfaces where the local dielectric constant can be reconfigured with applied bias voltages. Additionally, we reconfigure resonance frequency of split ring resonators without changing its amplitude by damping one of the two coupled metasurfaces via graphene. Our approach is general enough to implement various metamaterial systems that could yield new applications ranging from electrically switchable cloaking devices to adaptive camouflage systems.
  • We present a new approach for generating cluster states on-chip, with the state encoded in the spatial component of the photonic wavefunction. We show that for spatial encoding, a change of measurement basis can improve the practicality of cluster state algorithm implementation, and demonstrate this by simulating Grover's search algorithm. Our state generation scheme involves shaping the wavefunction produced by spontaneous parametric down-conversion in on-chip waveguides using specially tailored nonlinear poling patterns. Furthermore the form of the cluster state can be reconfigured quickly by driving different waveguides in the array.
  • Large surface plasmon polariton assisted enhancement of the magneto-optical activity has been observed in the past, through spectral measurements of the polar Kerr rotation in Co hexagonal antidot arrays. Here, we report a strong thickness dependence, which is unexpected given that the Kerr effect is considered a surface sensitive phenomena. The maximum Kerr rotation was found to be -0.66 degrees for a 100 nm thick sample. This thickness is far above the typical optical penetration depth of a continuous Co film, demonstrating that in the presence of plasmons the critical lengthscales are dramatically altered, and in this case extended. We therefore establish that the plasmon enhanced Kerr effect does not only depend on the in-plane structuring of the sample, but also on the out-of-plane geometrical parameters, which is an important consideration in magnetoplasmonic device design.
  • Many experiments in the field of quantum foundations seek to adjudicate between quantum theory and speculative alternatives to it. This requires one to analyze the experimental data in a manner that does not presume the correctness of the quantum formalism. The mathematical framework of generalized probabilistic theories (GPTs) provides a means of doing so. We present a scheme for determining which GPTs are consistent with a given set of experimental data. It proceeds by performing tomography on the preparations and measurements in a self-consistent manner, i.e., without presuming a prior characterization of either. We illustrate the scheme by analyzing experimental data for a large set of preparations and measurements on the polarization degree of freedom of a single photon. We find that the smallest and largest GPT state spaces consistent with our data are a pair of polytopes, each approximating the shape of the Bloch Sphere and having a volume ratio of $0.977 \pm 0.001$, which provides a quantitative bound on the scope for deviations from quantum theory. We also demonstrate how our scheme can be used to bound the extent to which nature might be more nonlocal than quantum theory predicts, as well as the extent to which it might be more or less contextual. Specifically, we find that the maximal violation of the CHSH inequality can be at most $1.3\% \pm 0.1$ greater than the quantum prediction, and the maximal violation of a particular inequality for universal noncontextuality can not differ from the quantum prediction by more than this factor on either side. The most significant loophole in this sort of analysis is that the set of preparations and measurements one implements might fail to be tomographically complete for the system of interest.
  • The propagation of electromagnetic waves through disordered layered system is considered in the paradigm of Maxwell's equations homogenization. In spite of the impossibility to describe the system in terms of effective dielectric permittivity and/or magnetic permeability the unified way to describe the propagation and Anderson localization of electromagnetic waves is proposed in terms of the introduced effective wave vector (effective refractive index). It is demonstrated that both real and imaginary parts of the effective wave vector (contrary to effective dielectric permittivity and/or magnetic permeability) are the self-averaging quantities at any frequency. The introduced effective wave vector is analytical function of frequency; corresponding Kramers-Kronig relation generalizes the Jones-Herbert-Thouless formula.
  • As reported in several recent publications, a spatial multiplexing involving the transmission of orthogonal waves carrying Orbital Angular Momentum (OAM) is unable to provide spectral efficiency improvements with respect to the conventional techniques. In this work we emphasize how the limits of an OAM multiple transmission between antenna arrays can be derived from the Shannon capacity formula, taking as a reference the performance of a multiplexing method based on the higher-order channel modes. Our approach clearly indicates that the two techniques offer the same on-axis performance. Conversely, small misalignments in the arrays positions affect the OAM scheme, highlighting the greater robustness of a traditional multiplexing method in the context of radio communications.
  • Time-dependent nonlinear media, such as rapidly generated plasmas produced via laser ionization of gases, can increase the energy of individual laser photons and generate tunable high-order harmonic pulses. This phenomenon, known as photon acceleration, has traditionally required extreme-intensity laser pulses and macroscopic propagation lengths. Here, we report on a novel nonlinear material$-$an ultrathin semiconductor metasurface$-$that exhibits efficient photon acceleration at low intensities. We observe a signature nonlinear manifestation of photon acceleration: third-harmonic generation of near-infrared photons with tunable frequencies reaching up to $\approx3.1\omega$. A simple time-dependent coupled-mode theory, found to be in good agreement with experimental results, is utilized to predict a new path towards nonlinear radiation sources that combine resonant upconversion with broadband operation.
  • Objective:Optoacoustic (photoacoustic) tomography is aimed at reconstructing maps of the initial pressure rise induced by the absorption of light pulses in tissue. In practice, due to inaccurate assumptions in the forward model, noise and other experimental factors, the images are often afflicted by artifacts, occasionally manifested as negative values. The aim of the work is to develop an inversion method which reduces the occurrence of negative values and improves the quantitative performance of optoacoustic imaging. Methods: We present a novel method for optoacoustic tomography based on an entropy maximization algorithm, which uses logarithmic regularization for attaining non-negative reconstructions. The reconstruction image quality is further improved using structural prior based fluence correction. Results: We report the performance achieved by the entropy maximization scheme on numerical simulation, experimental phantoms and in-vivo samples. Conclusion: The proposed algorithm demonstrates superior reconstruction performance by delivering non-negative pixel values with no visible distortion of anatomical structures. Significance: Our method can enable quantitative optoacoustic imaging, and has the potential to improve pre-clinical and translational imaging applications.
  • In this research, we employ accurate time-dependent density functional calculations for ultrashort laser spectroscopy of nitrogen molecule. Laser pulses with different frequencies, intensities, and durations are applied to the molecule and the resulting photoelectron spectra are analyzed. It is argued that relative orientation of the molecule in the laser pulse significantly influence the orbital character of the emitted photoelectrons. Moreover, the duration of the laser pulse is also found to be very effective in controlling the orbital resolution and intensity of photoelectrons. Angular resolved distribution of photoelectrons are computed at different pulse frequencies and recording times. By exponential growth of the laser pulse intensity, the theoretical threshold of two photons absorption in nitrogen molecule is determined.
  • Conventional nano-photonic schemes minimise multiple scattering to realise a miniaturised version of beam-splitters, interferometers and optical cavities for light propagation and lasing. Here instead, we introduce a nanophotonic network built from multiple paths and interference, to control and enhance light-matter interaction via light localisation. The network is built from a mesh of subwavelength waveguides, and can sustain localised modes and mirror-less light trapping stemming from interference over hundreds of nodes. With optical gain, these modes can easily lase, reaching $\sim$100 pm linewidths. We introduce a graph solution to the Maxwell's equation which describes light on the network, and predicts lasing action. In this framework, the network optical modes can be designed via the network connectivity and topology, and lasing can be tailored and enhanced by the network shape. Nanophotonic networks pave the way for new laser device architectures, which can be used for sensitive biosensing and on-chip optical information processing.
  • The scattering of electromagnetic pulses is described using a non-singular boundary integral method to solve directly for the field components in the frequency domain, and Fourier transform is then used to obtain the complete space-time behavior. This approach is stable for wavelengths both small and large relative to characteristic length scales. Amplitudes and phases of field values can be obtained accurately on or near material boundaries. Local field enhancement effects due to multiple scattering of interest to applications in microphotonics are demonstrated.
  • The paper presents a theoretical study of the eigenmodes of a misaligned ring multi-mirror laser cavity one or several arms of which are filled with an inhomogeneous medium. We start with posing the general problem of calculation of the radiation characteristics for a ring resonator with arbitrary inhomogeneities of the medium and mirrors, in the paraxial approximation. Then the general relations are specified for the lens-like resonator model in which the real and imaginary parts of the refractive index, as well as the phase and amplitude corrections performed by the mirrors, quadratically depend on the transverse coordinates. Explicit expressions are obtained for the eigen frequency and spatial characteristics of the radiation via the coefficients of the Hermite-Gaussian functions describing the complex amplitude distributions at the mirrors. The main results are formulated in terms of linear relations between positions of the resonator mode axis at the mirrors and the misalignment parameters (small shifts and tilts of the mirrors). The explicit results display the coefficients of the above linear relations. They are calculated for the 3-mirror cavity with using a specially developed approach employing peculiar conditions to the coefficients' form that follow from very general considerations of two groups: 1) Independence of the resulting frequency shifts on the sequence in which the misalignments are made (this is the base of the energy method for the resonator analysis, which is essentially generalized and improved); 2) Geometrical symmetry of the resonator. The results of calculations can be used in order to control the radiation characteristics in relation to the resonator misalignments, in particular, for analysis of the output radiation stability and sensitivity to small changes of the cavity configuration.
  • We present a boundary integral formulation of electromagnetic scattering by homogeneous bodies that are characterized by linear constitutive equations in the frequency domain. By working with the Cartesian components of the electric, E and magnetic, H fields and with the scalar functions (r*E) and (r*H), the problem is cast as solving a set of scalar Helmholtz equations for the field components that are coupled by the usual electromagnetic boundary conditions at material boundaries. This facilitates a direct solution for E and H rather than working with surface currents as intermediate quantities in existing methods. Consequently, our formulation is free of the well-known numerical instability that occurs in the zero frequency or long wavelength limit in traditional surface integral solutions of Maxwell's equations and our numerical results converge uniformly to the static results in the long wavelength limit. Furthermore, we use a formulation of the scalar Helmholtz equation that is expressed as classically convergent integrals and does not require the evaluation of principal value integrals or any knowledge of the solid angle. Therefore, standard quadrature and higher order surface elements can readily be used to improve numerical precision. In addition, near and far field values can be calculated with equal precision and multiscale problems in which the scatterers possess characteristic length scales that are both large and small relative to the wavelength can be easily accommodated. From this we obtain results for the scattering and transmission of electromagnetic waves at dielectric boundaries that are valid for any ratio of the local surface curvature to the wave number. This is a generalization of the familiar Fresnel formula and Snell's law, valid at planar dielectric boundaries, for the scattering and transmission of electromagnetic waves at surfaces of arbitrary curvature.
  • In traditional optical imaging systems, the spatial resolution is limited by the physics of diffraction, which acts as a low-pass filter. The information on sub-wavelength features is carried by evanescent waves, never reaching the camera, thereby posing a hard limit on resolution: the so-called diffraction limit. Modern microscopic methods enable super-resolution, by employing florescence techniques. State-of-the-art localization based fluorescence subwavelength imaging techniques such as PALM and STORM achieve sub-diffraction spatial resolution of several tens of nano-meters. However, they require tens of thousands of exposures, which limits their temporal resolution. We have recently proposed SPARCOM (sparsity based super-resolution correlation microscopy), which exploits the sparse nature of the fluorophores distribution, alongside a statistical prior of uncorrelated emissions, and showed that SPARCOM achieves spatial resolution comparable to PALM/STORM, while capturing the data hundreds of times faster. Here, we provide a detailed mathematical formulation of SPARCOM, which in turn leads to an efficient numerical implementation, suitable for large-scale problems. We further extend our method to a general framework for sparsity based super-resolution imaging, in which sparsity can be assumed in other domains such as wavelet or discrete-cosine, leading to improved reconstructions in a variety of physical settings.
  • The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moores law in the electronics industry. And while electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling-similar to electronics-is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled single atom plasmonic switch. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individual or at most -- a few atoms in a plasmonic cavity. Depending on the location of the atom either of two distinct plasmonic cavity resonance states are supported. Experimental results show reversible digital optical switching with an extinction ration of 10 dB and operation at room temperature with femtojoule (fJ) power consumption for a single switch operation. This demonstration of a CMOS compatible, integrated quantum device allowing to control photons at the single-atom level opens intriguing perspectives for a fully integrated and highly scalable chip platform -- a platform where optics, electronics and memory may be controlled at the single-atom level.
  • It is shown that tailored breaking of the translational symmetry through weak scattering in waveguides and optical fibers can control chromatic dispersions of the individual modes at any order; thereby, it overcomes the problem of coherent classical and quantum signal transmission at long distances. The methodology is based on previously developed quantum control techniques and gives analytic solution in ideal scattering conditions and tractable numerical solution in the generic case. In practice, it requires scatterers able to couple different modes and carefully designed dispersion laws giving a null average quadratic dispersion in the vicinity of the operational frequency.
  • We extend Feynman's analysis of the infinite ladder AC circuit to fractal AC circuits. We show that the characteristic impedances can have positive real part even though all the individual impedances inside the circuit are purely imaginary. This provides a physical setting for analyzing wave propagation of signals on fractals, by analogy with the Telegrapher's Equation, and generalizes the real resistance metric on a fractal, which provides a measure of distance on a fractal, to complex impedances.
  • Temporal-dissipative Kerr solitons are self-localized light pulses sustained in driven nonlinear optical resonators. Their realization in microresonators has enabled compact sources of coherent optical frequency combs as well as the study of dissipative solitons. A key parameter of their dynamics is the effective-detuning of the pump laser to the thermally- and Kerr-shifted cavity resonance. Together with the free spectral range and dispersion, it governs the soliton-pulse duration, as predicted by an approximate analytical solution of the Lugiato-Lefever equation. Yet, a precise experimental verification of this relation was lacking so far. Here, by measuring and controlling the effective-detuning, we establish a new way of stabilizing solitons in microresonators and demonstrate that the measured relation linking soliton width and detuning deviates by less than 1 % from the approximate expression, validating its excellent predictive power. Furthermore, a detuning-dependent enhancement of specific comb lines is revealed, due to linear couplings between mode-families. They cause deviations from the predicted comb power evolution, and induce a detuning-dependent soliton recoil that modifies the pulse repetition-rate, explaining its unexpected dependence on laser-detuning. Finally, we observe that detuning-dependent mode-crossings can destabilize the soliton, leading to an unpredicted soliton breathing regime (oscillations of the pulse) that occurs in a normally-stable regime. Our results test the approximate analytical solutions with an unprecedented degree of accuracy and provide new insights into dissipative-soliton dynamics.