• We present an analysis of the wind circulation in the vecinity of the ground surface, for a region centered around Guatemala. We used the regional climate model RegCM to simulate the atmospheric dynamics above that region during the full year 2016. The purpose of the study is to obtain the mesoscale variation (tens of kilometers) of the wind velocity field. It can be seen that as resolution is increased, the details in topography are better represented, they in turn influence the wind circulation patterns on scales of a few kilometers. With a fine resolution of 2 km it is possible to confirm the existence of intense wind flux zones over the surface; such as Pal\'in, Escuintla. We are also able to observe diurnally varying circulations, which are the product of the daily cycle of terrain heating due to the sun and the subsecuent cooling during the night. This is the first report in a line of studies where we plan to analyze the climatic features of the Guatemalan region.
  • (Abr.) Laser guide stars employed at astronomical observatories provide artificial wavefront reference sources to help correct (in part) the impact of atmospheric turbulence on astrophysical observations. Following the recent commissioning of the 4 Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF) on UT4 at the VLT, we characterize the spectral signature of the uplink beams from the 22W lasers to assess the impact of laser scattering from the 4LGSF on science observations. We use the MUSE optical integral field spectrograph to acquire spectra at a resolution of R~3000 of the uplink laser beams over the wavelength range of 4750\AA\ to 9350\AA. We report the first detection of laser-induced Raman scattering by N2, O2, CO2, H2O and (tentatively) CH4 molecules in the atmosphere above the astronomical observatory of Cerro Paranal. In particular, our observations reveal the characteristic spectral signature of laser photons -- but 480\AA\ to 2210\AA\ redder than the original laser wavelength of 5889.959\AA\ -- landing on the 8.2m primary mirror of UT4 after being Raman-scattered on their way up to the sodium layer. Laser-induced Raman scattering is not unique to the observatory of Cerro Paranal, but common to any astronomical telescope employing a laser-guide-star (LGS) system. It is thus essential for any optical spectrograph coupled to a LGS system to handle thoroughly the possibility of a Raman spectral contamination via a proper baffling of the instrument and suitable calibrations procedures. These considerations are particularly applicable for the HARMONI optical spectrograph on the upcoming Extremely Large Telescope. At sites hosting multiple telescopes, laser collision prediction tools also ought to account for the presence of Raman emission from the uplink laser beam(s) to avoid the unintentional contamination of observations acquired with telescopes in the vicinity of a LGS system.
  • Zonal jets in a barotropic setup emerge out of homogeneous turbulence through a flow-forming instability of the homogeneous turbulent state (`zonostrophic instability') which occurs as the turbulence intensity increases. This has been demonstrated using the statistical state dynamics (SSD) framework with a closure at second order. Furthermore, it was shown that for small supercriticality the flow-forming instability follows Ginzburg-Landau (G-L) dynamics. Here, the SSD framework is used to study the equilibration of this flow-forming instability for small supercriticality. First, we compare the predictions of the weakly nonlinear G-L dynamics to the fully nonlinear SSD dynamics closed at second order for a wide ranges of parameters. A new branch of jet equilibria is revealed that is not contiguously connected with the G-L branch. This new branch at weak supercriticalities involves jets with larger amplitude compared to the ones of the G-L branch. Furthermore, this new branch continues even for subcritical values with respect to the linear flow-forming instability. Thus, a new nonlinear flow-forming instability out of homogeneous turbulence is revealed. Second, we investigate how both the linear flow-forming instability and the novel nonlinear flow-forming instability are equilibrated. We identify the physical processes underlying the jet equilibration as well as the types of eddies that contribute in each process. Third, we propose a modification of the diffusion coefficient of the G-L dynamics that is able to capture the asymmetric evolution for weak jets at scales other than the marginal scale (side-band instabilities) for the linear flow-forming instability.
  • A key interest in geomorphology is to predict how the shear stress $\tau$ exerted by a turbulent flow of air or liquid onto an erodible sediment bed affects the transport load $M\tilde g$ (i.e., the submerged weight of transported nonsuspended sediment per unit area) and its average velocity when exceeding the sediment transport threshold $\tau_t$. Most transport rate predictions in the literature are based on the scaling $M\tilde g\propto\tau-\tau_t$, the physical origin of which, however, has remained controversial. Here we test the universality and study the origin of this scaling law using particle-scale simulations of nonsuspended sediment transport driven by a large range of Newtonian fluids. We find that the scaling coefficient is a universal approximate constant and can be understood as an inverse granular friction coefficient (i.e., the ratio between granular shear stress and normal-bed pressure) evaluated at the base of the transport layer (i.e., the effective elevation of energetic particle-bed rebounds). Usually, the granular flow at this base is gaslike and rapidly turns into the solidlike granular bed underneath: a liquidlike regime does not necessarily exist, which is accentuated by a nonlocal granular flow rheology in both the transport layer and bed. Hence, this transition fundamentally differs from the solid-liquid transition (i.e., yielding) in dense granular flows even though both transitions are described by a friction law. Combining this result with recent insights into the nature of $\tau_t$, we conclude that the transport load scaling is a signature of a steady rebound state and unrelated to entrainment of bed sediment.
  • In order to isolate effects of non-stationarity from effects due to nonlinearity and non-Gaussianity, a doubly stochastic advection-diffusion-decay model (DSADM) is proposed. The model (defined on the 1D circular spatial domain) is hierarchical: it is a linear stochastic partial differential equation whose coefficients are transformed spatio-temporal random fields that by themselves satisfy their own stochastic partial differential equations with constant coefficients. The model generates conditionally Gaussian random fields that have complex spatio-temporal covariances with the tunable degree of non-stationarity in space and time. In numerical experiments with hybrid ensemble filters and DSADM as the "model of truth", it is shown that the degree of non-stationarity affects the optimal weights of ensemble vs. climatological covariances in EnVar and the optimal weights of ensemble vs. time-smoothed recent past covariances in the Hierarchical Bayes Ensemble Filter (HBEF) by Tsyrulnikov and Rakitko, 2017. The stronger is the non-stationarity, the less useful is the static covariance matrix and the more beneficial are the time-smoothed recent past covariances as the building block of the filter's analysis covariance matrix. A new hybrid-HBEF filter (HHBEF), which combines EnVar and HBEF, is proposed. HHBEF is shown to outperform EnKF, EnVar, and HBEF in non-stationary filtering regimes.
  • Predicting Arctic sea ice extent is a notoriously difficult forecasting problem, even for lead times as short as one month. Motivated by Arctic intraannual variability phenomena such as reemergence of sea surface temperature and sea ice anomalies, we use a prediction approach for sea ice anomalies based on analog forecasting. Traditional analog forecasting relies on identifying a single analog in a historical record, usually by minimizing Euclidean distance, and forming a forecast from the analog's historical trajectory. Here an ensemble of analogs are used to make forecasts, where the ensemble weights are determined by a dynamics-adapted similarity kernel, which takes into account the nonlinear geometry on the underlying data manifold. We apply this method for forecasting pan-Arctic and regional sea ice area and volume anomalies from multi-century climate model data, and in many cases find improvement over the benchmark damped persistence forecast. Examples of success include the 3--6 month lead time prediction of pan-Arctic area, the winter sea ice area prediction of some marginal ice zone seas, and the 3--12 month lead time prediction of sea ice volume anomalies in many central Arctic basins. We discuss possible connections between KAF success and sea ice reemergence, and find KAF to be successful in regions and seasons exhibiting high interannual variability.
  • We carry out a study of the statistical distribution of rainfall precipitation data for 20 cites in India. We have determined the best-fit probability distribution for these cities from the monthly precipitation data spanning 100 years of observations from 1901 to 2002. To fit the observed data, we considered 10 different distributions. The efficacy of the fits for these distributions was evaluated using four empirical non-parametric goodness-of-fit tests namely Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Anderson-Darling, Chi-Square, Akaike information criterion, and Bayesian Information criterion. Finally, the best-fit distribution using each of these tests were reported, by combining the results from the model comparison tests. We then find that for most of the cities, Generalized Extreme-Value Distribution or Inverse Gaussian Distribution most adequately fits the observed data.
  • Using particle-scale simulations of non-suspended sediment transport for a large range of Newtonian fluids driving transport, including air and water, we determine the bulk transport cessation threshold $\Theta^r_t$ by extrapolating the transport load as a function of the dimensionless fluid shear stress (`Shields number') $\Theta$ to the vanishing transport limit. In this limit, the simulated steady states of continuous transport can be described by simple analytical model equations relating the average transport layer properties to the law of the wall flow velocity profile. We use this model to calculate $\Theta^r_t$ for arbitrary environments and derive a general Shields-like threshold diagram in which a Stokes-like number replaces the particle Reynolds number. Despite the simplicity of our hydrodynamic description, the predicted cessation threshold, both from the simulations and analytical model, quantitatively agrees with measurements for transport in air and viscous and turbulent liquids despite not being fitted to these measurements. We interpret the analytical model as a description of a continuous rebound motion of transported particles and thus $\Theta^r_t$ as the minimal fluid shear stress needed to compensate the average energy loss of transported particles during an average rebound at the bed surface. This interpretation, supported by simulations near $\Theta^r_t$, implies that entrainment mechanisms are needed to sustain transport above $\Theta^r_t$. While entrainment by turbulent events sustains intermittent transport, entrainment by particle-bed impacts sustains continuous transport. Combining our interpretations with the critical energy criterion for incipient motion by Valyrakis and coworkers, we put forward a new conceptual picture of sediment transport intermittency.
  • We review matrix methods as applied to tracer transport. Because tracer transport is linear, matrix methods are an ideal fit for the problem. A gridded, Eulerian tracer simulation can be approximated as a system of linear ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The first-order stretching and deformation of Lagrangian space can also be calculated using a system of linear ODEs. Solutions to these equations are reviewed as well as special properties. Using matrices to model Eulerian tracer transport can also help understand and improve the stability of numerical solutions. Detailed derivations are included.
  • Ocean flows are routinely inferred from low-resolution satellite altimetry measurements of sea surface height assuming a geostrophic balance. Recent nonlinear dynamical systems techniques have revealed that surface currents derived from altimetry can support mesoscale eddies with material boundaries that do not filament for many months, thereby representing effective transport mechanisms. However, the long-range Lagrangian coherence assessed for mesoscale eddy boundaries detected from altimetry is constrained by the impossibility of current altimeters to resolve ageostrophic submesoscale motions. These may act to prevent Lagrangian coherence from manifesting in the rigorous form described by the nonlinear dynamical systems theories. Here we use a combination of satellite ocean color and surface drifter trajectory data, rarely available simultaneously over an extended period of time, to provide observational evidence for the enduring Lagrangian coherence of a Loop Current ring detected from altimetry. We also seek indications of this behavior in the flow produced by a data-assimilative system which demonstrated ability to reproduce observed relative dispersion statistics down into the marginally submesoscale range. However, the simulated flow, total surface and subsurface or subsampled emulating altimetry, is not found to support the long-lasting Lagrangian coherence that characterizes the observed ring. This highlights the importance of the Lagrangian metrics produced by the nonlinear dynamical systems tools employed here in assessing model performance.
  • Simulations of strongly stratified turbulence often exhibit coherent large-scale structures called vertically sheared horizontal flows (VSHFs). VSHFs emerge in both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) stratified turbulence with similar vertical structure. The mechanism responsible for VSHF formation is not fully understood. In this work, the formation and equilibration of VSHFs in a 2D Boussinesq model of stratified turbulence is studied using statistical state dynamics (SSD). In SSD, equations of motion are expressed directly in the statistical variables of the turbulent state. Restriction to 2D turbulence makes available an analytically and computationally attractive implementation of SSD referred to as S3T, in which the SSD is expressed by coupling the equation for the horizontal mean structure with the equation for the ensemble mean perturbation covariance. This second order SSD produces accurate statistics, through second order, when compared with fully nonlinear simulations. In particular, S3T captures the spontaneous emergence of the VSHF and associated density layers seen in simulations of turbulence maintained by homogeneous large-scale stochastic excitation. An advantage of the S3T system is that the VSHF formation mechanism, which is wave-mean flow interaction between the emergent VSHF and the stochastically excited large-scale gravity waves, is analytically understood in the S3T system. Comparison with fully nonlinear simulations verifies that S3T solutions accurately predict the scale selection, dependence on stochastic excitation strength, and nonlinear equilibrium structure of the VSHF. These results facilitate relating VSHF theory and geophysical examples of turbulent jets such as the ocean's equatorial deep jets.
  • Identifying causal relationships from observational time series data is a key problem in disciplines such as climate science or neuroscience, where experiments are often not possible. Data-driven causal inference is challenging since datasets are often high-dimensional and nonlinear with limited sample sizes. Here we introduce a novel method that flexibly combines linear or nonlinear conditional independence tests with a causal discovery algorithm that allows to reconstruct causal networks from large-scale time series datasets. We validate the method on a well-established climatic teleconnection connecting the tropical Pacific with extra-tropical temperatures and using large-scale synthetic datasets mimicking the typical properties of real data. The experiments demonstrate that our method outperforms alternative techniques in detection power from small to large-scale datasets and opens up entirely new possibilities to discover causal networks from time series across a range of research fields.
  • The Yangtze River has been subject to heavy flooding throughout history, and in recent times severe floods such as those in 1998 have resulted in heavy loss of life and livelihoods. Dams along the river help to manage flood waters, and are important sources of electricity for the region. Being able to forecast high-impact events at long lead times therefore has enormous potential benefit. Recent improvements in seasonal forecasting mean that dynamical climate models can start to be used directly for operational services. The teleconnection from El Ni\~no to Yangtze River basin rainfall meant that the strong El Ni\~no in winter 2015/2016 provided a valuable opportunity to test the application of a dynamical forecast system. This paper therefore presents a case study of a real time seasonal forecast for the Yangtze River basin, building on previous work demonstrating the retrospective skill of such a forecast. A simple forecasting methodology is presented, in which the forecast probabilities are derived from the historical relationship between hindcast and observations. Its performance for 2016 is discussed. The heavy rainfall in the May-June-July period was correctly forecast well in advance. August saw anomalously low rainfall, and the forecasts for the June-July-August period correctly showed closer to average levels. The forecasts contributed to the confidence of decision-makers across the Yangtze River basin. Trials of climate services such as this help to promote appropriate use of seasonal forecasts, and highlight areas for future improvements.
  • We assess the skill and reliability of forecasts of winter and summer temperature, wind speed and irradiance over China, using the GloSea5 seasonal forecast system. Skill in such forecasts is important for the future development of seasonal climate services for the energy sector, allowing better estimates of forthcoming demand and renewable electricity supply. We find that although overall the skill from the direct model output is patchy, some high-skill regions of interest to the energy sector can be identified. In particular, winter mean wind speed is skilfully forecast around the coast of the South China Sea, related to skilful forecasts of the El Ni\~no--Southern Oscillation. Such information could improve seasonal estimates of offshore wind power generation. Similarly, forecasts of winter irradiance have good skill in eastern central China, with possible use for solar power estimation. Much of China shows skill in summer temperatures, which derives from an upward trend. However, the region around Beijing retains this skill even when detrended. This temperature skill could be helpful in managing summer energy demand. While both the strengths and limitations of our results will need to be considered when developing seasonal climate services in the future, the outlook for such service development in China is promising.
  • Balloon releases are one of the main attractions of many fairs. Helium filled rubber balloons are released to carry postcards over preferably long distances. Although such balloons have been considered in atmospheric sciences and air safety analysis, there is only scarce literature available on the subject. This work intends to close this gap by providing a comprehensive theoretical overview and a thorough analysis of real-life data. All relevant physical properties of a rubber balloon are carefully modelled and supplemented by weather observations to form a self-contained trajectory simulation tool. The analysis of diverse balloon releases provided detailed insight into the flight dynamics and potential optimisations. Helium balloons are found to reach routinely altitudes above 10 km. Under optimal conditions, they could stay more than 24 hours airborne while reaching flight distances close to 3000 km. However, external weather effects reduce the typical lifetime to 2-5 hours.
  • We commonly refer to state-estimation theory in geosciences as data assimilation. This term encompasses the entire sequence of operations that, starting from the observations of a system, and from additional statistical and dynamical information (such as a dynamical evolution model), provides an estimate of its state. Data assimilation is standard practice in numerical weather prediction, but its application is becoming widespread in many other areas of climate, atmosphere, ocean and environment modeling; in all circumstances where one intends to estimate the state of a large dynamical system based on limited information. While the complexity of data assimilation, and of the methods thereof, stands on its interdisciplinary nature across statistics, dynamical systems and numerical optimization, when applied to geosciences an additional difficulty arises by the continually increasing sophistication of the environmental models. Thus, in spite of data assimilation being nowadays ubiquitous in geosciences, it has so far remained a topic mostly reserved to experts. We aim this overview article at geoscientists with a background in mathematical and physical modeling, who are interested in the rapid development of data assimilation and its growing domains of application in environmental science, but so far have not delved into its conceptual and methodological complexities.
  • Sea-level rise poses considerable risks to coastal communities, ecosystems, and infrastructure. Decision makers are faced with uncertain sea-level projections when designing a strategy for coastal adaptation. The traditional methods are often silent on tradeoffs as well as the effects of tail-area events and of potential future learning. Here we reformulate a simple sea-level rise adaptation model to address these concerns. We show that Direct Policy Search yields improved solution quality, with respect to Pareto-dominance in the objectives, over the traditional approach under uncertain sea-level rise projections and storm surge. Additionally, the new formulation produces high quality solutions with less computational demands than an intertemporal optimization approach. Our results illustrate the utility of multi-objective adaptive formulations for the example of coastal adaptation and point to wider-ranging application in climate change adaptation decision problems.
  • Bursts of gamma ray showers have been observed in coincidence with downward propagating negative leaders in lightning flashes by the Telescope Array Surface Detector (TASD). The TASD is a 700~square kilometer cosmic ray observatory located in southwestern Utah, U.S.A. In data collected between 2014 and 2016, correlated observations showing the structure and temporal development of three shower-producing flashes were obtained with a 3D lightning mapping array, and electric field change measurements were obtained for an additional seven flashes, in both cases co-located with the TASD. National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) information was also used throughout. The showers arrived in a sequence of 2--5 short-duration ($\le$10~$\mu$s) bursts over time intervals of several hundred microseconds, and originated at an altitude of $\simeq$3--5 kilometers above ground level during the first 1--2 ms of downward negative leader breakdown at the beginning of cloud-to-ground lightning flashes. The shower footprints, associated waveforms and the effect of atmospheric propagation indicate that the showers consist primarily of downward-beamed gamma radiation. This has been supported by GEANT simulation studies, which indicate primary source fluxes of $\simeq$$10^{12}$--$10^{14}$ photons for $16^{\circ}$ half-angle beams. We conclude that the showers are terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs), similar to those observed by satellites, but that the ground-based observations are more representative of the temporal source activity and are also more sensitive than satellite observations, which detect only the most powerful TGFs.
  • In the present manuscript, we consider the problem of dispersive wave simulation on a rotating globally spherical geometry. In this Part IV, we focus on numerical aspects while the model derivation was described in Part III. The algorithm we propose is based on the splitting approach. Namely, equations are decomposed on a uniformly elliptic equation for the dispersive pressure component and a hyperbolic part of shallow water equations (on a sphere) with source terms. This algorithm is implemented as a two-step predictor-corrector scheme. On every step, we solve separately elliptic and hyperbolic problems. Then, the performance of this algorithm is illustrated on model idealised situations with an even bottom, where we estimate the influence of sphericity and rotation effects on dispersive wave propagation. The dispersive effects are quantified depending on the propagation distance over the sphere and on the linear extent of generation region. Finally, the numerical method is applied to a couple of real-world events. Namely, we undertake simulations of the Bulgarian 2007 and Chilean 2010 tsunamis. Whenever the data is available, our computational results are confronted with real measurements.
  • The kinetic equation for a gravity wave spectrum is solved numerically to study the high frequencies asymptotes for the one-dimensional nonlinear energy transfer and the variability of spectrum parameters that accompany the long-term evolution of nonlinear swell. The cases of initial two-dimensional spectra of the different frequency decay-law with the power n and various initial functions of the angular distribution are considered. It is shown that at the first step of the kinetic equation solution, the nonlinear energy transfer asymptote has the power-like decay-law with values p less n-1, valid for cases in which n greater 5, and the difference, n-p, changes significantly when n approaches 4. On time scales of evolution greater than several hundred initial wave-periods, in every case, a self-similar spectrum Ssf is established with the frequency decay-law of power -4. Herein, the asymptote of nonlinear energy transfer becomes negative in value and decreases according to the same law The peak frequency of the spectrum migrates to the low-frequency region such that the angular and frequency characteristics of the two-dimensional spectrum Ssf remain constant. However, these characteristics depend on the degree of angular anisotropy of the initial spectrum. The solutions obtained are interpreted, and their connection with the analytical solutions of the kinetic equation by Zakharov and co-authors for gravity waves in water is discussed.
  • We study the relationship between the El Ni\~no--Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Indian summer monsoon in ensemble simulations from state-of-the-art climate models, the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model (MPI-ESM) and the Community Earth System Model (CESM). We consider two simple variables: the Tahiti--Darwin sea-level pressure difference and the Northern Indian precipitation. We utilize ensembles converged to the snapshot attractor of the system for analyzing possible changes (i) in the teleconnection between the fluctuations of the two variables, and (ii) in their climatic means. (i) With very high confidence, we detect an increase in the strength of the teleconnection in the MPI-ESM under historical forcing between 1890 and 2005, which is in contrast with scientific consensus. In the MPI-ESM no similar increase is present between 2006 and 2099 under the Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 (RCP8.5), and in a 110-year-long 1-percent pure CO2 scenario; neither is in the CESM between 1960 and 2100 with historical forcing and RCP8.5. The static susceptibility of the strength of the teleconnection with respect to radiative forcing (assuming an instantaneous and linear response) is at least three times larger in the historical MPI-ESM ensemble than in the others. (ii) In the other ensembles, the climatic mean is strongly displaced in the phase space projection spanned by the two variables. This displacement is nevertheless linear. However, the slope exhibits a strong seasonality, falsifying a hypothesis of a universal relation, an emergent constraint, that would be valid at all time scales between these two climatic means.
  • Data assimilation is uniquely challenging in weather forecasting due to the high dimensionality of the employed models and the nonlinearity of the governing equations. Although current operational schemes are used successfully, our understanding of their long-term error behaviour is still incomplete. In this work, we study the error of some simple data assimilation schemes in the presence of unbounded (e.g. Gaussian) noise on a wide class of dissipative dynamical systems with certain properties, including the Lorenz models and the 2D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. We exploit the properties of the dynamics to derive analytic bounds on the long-term error for individual realisations of the noise in time. These bounds are proportional to the amplitude of the noise. Furthermore, we find that the error exhibits a form of stationary behaviour, and in particular an accumulation of error does not occur. This improves on previous results in which either the noise was bounded or the error was considered in expectation only.
  • A topological computation method, called the MGSTD method, is applied to time-series data obtained from meteorological measurement. The method gives decomposition of the dynamics into invariant sets and gradient-like transitions between them, by dividing the phase space into grids and representing the time-series as a combinatorial multi-valued map over the grids. Since the time-series is highly stochastic, the multi-valued map is statistically determined by taking preferable transitions between the grids into account. The time-series data are principal components of pressure pattern in troposphere and stratosphere in the northern hemisphere. The application yields some particular transitions between invariant sets, which leads to circular motion on the phase space spanned by the principal components. The Morse sets and the circular motion are consistent with the characteristic pressure patterns and the change between them that have been shown in preceding meteorological studies.
  • Two subsystems of the Asian Monsoon: the Indian Summer Monsoon and the Western North Pacific Monsoon, have been analysed using their daily indices ISMI and WNPMI. It is shown that the high-frequency tails of the ISMI and WNPMI spectra have the stretched exponential form $E(f) \propto \exp-(f/f_0)^{\beta}$ characteristic to the Hamiltonian distributed chaos with analytical values of the parameter $\beta =3/4$ and $\beta =1/2$ respectively. The relevant daily indices Ni\~no3.4 and Ni\~no4 (with $\beta =1/2$) of the El Ni\~no-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Australian Monsoon (AUSM index with $\beta = 1/2$) have been also discussed in this context.
  • A simple analytical model is developed for the current induced by the wind and modified by surface wind-waves in the oceanic surface layer, based on a first-order turbulence closure and including the effect of a vortex force representing the Stokes drift of the waves. The shear stress is partitioned between a component due to shear in the current, which is reduced at low turbulent Langmuir number ($La_t$), and a wave-induced component, which decays over a depth proportional to the dominant wavelength. The model reproduces the apparent reduction of the friction velocity and enhancement of the roughness length estimated from current profiles, detected in a number of studies. These effects are predicted to intensify as $La_t$ decreases, and are entirely attributed to non-breaking surface waves. The current profile becomes flatter for low $La_t$ owing to a smaller fraction of the total shear stress being supported by the current shear. Comparisons of the model with the comprehensive dataset provided by the laboratory experiments of Cheung and Street show encouraging agreement, with the current speed decreasing as the wind speed increases (corresponding to decreasing $La_t$), if the model is adjusted to reflect the effects of a full wave spectrum on the intensity and depth of penetration of the wave-induced stress. A version of the model where the shear stress decreases to zero over a depth consistent with the measurements accurately predicts the surface current speed. These results contribute towards developing physically-based momentum flux parameterizations for the wave-affected boundary layer in ocean circulation models.