• Combining deep neural networks with structured logic rules is desirable to harness flexibility and reduce uninterpretability of the neural models. We propose a general framework capable of enhancing various types of neural networks (e.g., CNNs and RNNs) with declarative first-order logic rules. Specifically, we develop an iterative distillation method that transfers the structured information of logic rules into the weights of neural networks. We deploy the framework on a CNN for sentiment analysis, and an RNN for named entity recognition. With a few highly intuitive rules, we obtain substantial improvements and achieve state-of-the-art or comparable results to previous best-performing systems.
  • McKernel introduces a framework to use kernel approximates in the mini-batch setting with Stochastic Gradient Descent (SGD) as an alternative to Deep Learning. Based on Random Kitchen Sinks [Rahimi and Recht 2007], we provide a C++ library for Large-scale Machine Learning. It contains a CPU optimized implementation of the algorithm in [Le et al. 2013], that allows the computation of approximated kernel expansions in log-linear time. The algorithm requires to compute the product of matrices Walsh Hadamard. A cache friendly Fast Walsh Hadamard that achieves compelling speed and outperforms current state-of-the-art methods has been developed. McKernel establishes the foundation of a new architecture of learning that allows to obtain large-scale non-linear classification combining lightning kernel expansions and a linear classifier. It travails in the mini-batch setting working analogously to Neural Networks. We show the validity of our method through extensive experiments on MNIST and FASHION-MNIST [Xiao et al. 2017].
  • This paper is a survey and an analysis of different ways of using deep learning to generate musical content. We propose a methodology based on five dimensions: Objective - What musical content is to be generated? Examples are: melody, polyphony, accompaniment or counterpoint. - For what destination and for what use? To be performed by a human(s) (in the case of a musical score), or by a machine (in the case of an audio file). Representation - What are the concepts to be manipulated? Examples are: waveform, spectrogram, note, chord, meter and beat. - What format is to be used? Examples are: MIDI, piano roll or text. - How will the representation be encoded? Examples are: scalar, one-hot or many-hot. Architecture - What type(s) of deep neural network is (are) to be used? Examples are: feedforward network, recurrent network, autoencoder or generative adversarial networks. Challenges - What are the limitations and open challenges? Examples are: variability, interactivity and creativity. Strategy - How do we model and control the process of generation? Examples are: single-step feedforward, iterative feedforward, sampling or input manipulation. For each dimension, we conduct a comparative analysis of various models and techniques and propose some tentative multidimensional typology which is bottom-up, based on the analysis of many existing deep-learning based systems for music generation selected from the relevant literature. These systems are described and used to exemplify the various choices of objective, representation, architecture, challenges and strategies. The last part of the paper includes some discussion and some prospects. This is a simplified version (weak DRM) of the book: Briot, J.-P., Hadjeres, G. and Pachet, F.-D. (2019) Deep Learning Techniques for Music Generation, Computational Synthesis and Creative Systems, Springer.
  • We analyze the asymptotic behavior of the Bayesian generalization error in the topic model. Through a theoretical analysis of the maximum pole of the zeta function (real log canonical threshold) of the topic model, we obtain an upper bound of the Bayesian generalization error and the free energy in the topic model and stochastic matrix factorization (SMF; it can be regarded as a restriction of the non-negative matrix factorization). We show that the generalization error in the topic model and SMF becomes smaller than that of regular statistical models if Bayesian inference is attained.
  • Background. A large number of algorithms is being developed to reconstruct evolutionary models of individual tumours from genome sequencing data. Most methods can analyze multiple samples collected either through bulk multi-region sequencing experiments or the sequencing of individual cancer cells. However, rarely the same method can support both data types. Results. We introduce TRaIT, a computational framework to infer mutational graphs that model the accumulation of multiple types of somatic alterations driving tumour evolution. Compared to other tools, TRaIT supports multi-region and single-cell sequencing data within the same statistical framework, and delivers expressive models that capture many complex evolutionary phenomena. TRaIT improves accuracy, robustness to data-specific errors and computational complexity compared to competing methods. Conclusions. We show that the application of TRaIT to single-cell and multi-region cancer datasets can produce accurate and reliable models of single-tumour evolution, quantify the extent of intra-tumour heterogeneity and generate new testable experimental hypotheses.
  • Distributed machine learning algorithms enable learning of models from datasets that are distributed over a network without gathering the data at a centralized location. While efficient distributed algorithms have been developed under the assumption of faultless networks, failures that can render these algorithms nonfunctional occur frequently in the real world. This paper focuses on the problem of Byzantine failures, which are the hardest to safeguard against in distributed algorithms. While Byzantine fault tolerance has a rich history, existing work does not translate into efficient and practical algorithms for high-dimensional learning in fully distributed (also known as decentralized) settings. In this paper, an algorithm termed Byzantine-resilient distributed coordinate descent (ByRDiE) is developed and analyzed that enables distributed learning in the presence of Byzantine failures. Theoretical analysis (convex settings) and numerical experiments (convex and nonconvex settings) highlight its usefulness for high-dimensional distributed learning in the presence of Byzantine failures.
  • We discuss a multiple-play multi-armed bandit (MAB) problem in which several arms are selected at each round. Recently, Thompson sampling (TS), a randomized algorithm with a Bayesian spirit, has attracted much attention for its empirically excellent performance, and it is revealed to have an optimal regret bound in the standard single-play MAB problem. In this paper, we propose the multiple-play Thompson sampling (MP-TS) algorithm, an extension of TS to the multiple-play MAB problem, and discuss its regret analysis. We prove that MP-TS for binary rewards has the optimal regret upper bound that matches the regret lower bound provided by Anantharam et al. (1987). Therefore, MP-TS is the first computationally efficient algorithm with optimal regret. A set of computer simulations was also conducted, which compared MP-TS with state-of-the-art algorithms. We also propose a modification of MP-TS, which is shown to have better empirical performance.
  • In school, a teacher plays an important role in various classroom teaching patterns. Likewise to this human learning activity, the learning using privileged information (LUPI) paradigm provides additional information generated by the teacher to 'teach' learning models during the training stage. Therefore, this novel learning paradigm is a typical Teacher-Student Interaction mechanism. This paper is the first to present a random vector functional link network based on the LUPI paradigm, called RVFL+. Rather than simply combining two existing approaches, the newly-derived RVFL+ fills the gap between classical randomized neural networks and the newfashioned LUPI paradigm, which offers an alternative way to train RVFL networks. Moreover, the proposed RVFL+ can perform in conjunction with the kernel trick for highly complicated nonlinear feature learning, which is termed KRVFL+. Furthermore, the statistical property of the proposed RVFL+ is investigated, and we present a sharp and high-quality generalization error bound based on the Rademacher complexity. Competitive experimental results on 14 real-world datasets illustrate the great effectiveness and efficiency of the novel RVFL+ and KRVFL+, which can achieve better generalization performance than state-of-the-art methods.
  • Consider the multivariate nonparametric regression model. It is shown that estimators based on sparsely connected deep neural networks with ReLU activation function and properly chosen network architecture achieve the minimax rates of convergence (up to $\log n$-factors) under a general composition assumption on the regression function. The framework includes many well-studied structural constraints such as (generalized) additive models. While there is a lot of flexibility in the network architecture, the tuning parameter is the sparsity of the network. Specifically, we consider large networks with number of potential network parameters exceeding the sample size. The analysis gives some insights into why multilayer feedforward neural networks perform well in practice. Interestingly, for ReLU activation function the depth (number of layers) of the neural network architectures plays an important role and our theory suggests that for nonparametric regression, scaling the network depth with the sample size is natural. It is also shown that under the composition assumption wavelet estimators can only achieve suboptimal rates.
  • We analyze the learning properties of the stochastic gradient method when multiple passes over the data and mini-batches are allowed. We study how regularization properties are controlled by the step-size, the number of passes and the mini-batch size. In particular, we consider the square loss and show that for a universal step-size choice, the number of passes acts as a regularization parameter, and optimal finite sample bounds can be achieved by early-stopping. Moreover, we show that larger step-sizes are allowed when considering mini-batches. Our analysis is based on a unifying approach, encompassing both batch and stochastic gradient methods as special cases. As a byproduct, we derive optimal convergence results for batch gradient methods (even in the non-attainable cases).
  • We study high-dimensional distribution learning in an agnostic setting where an adversary is allowed to arbitrarily corrupt an $\varepsilon$-fraction of the samples. Such questions have a rich history spanning statistics, machine learning and theoretical computer science. Even in the most basic settings, the only known approaches are either computationally inefficient or lose dimension-dependent factors in their error guarantees. This raises the following question:Is high-dimensional agnostic distribution learning even possible, algorithmically? In this work, we obtain the first computationally efficient algorithms with dimension-independent error guarantees for agnostically learning several fundamental classes of high-dimensional distributions: (1) a single Gaussian, (2) a product distribution on the hypercube, (3) mixtures of two product distributions (under a natural balancedness condition), and (4) mixtures of spherical Gaussians. Our algorithms achieve error that is independent of the dimension, and in many cases scales nearly-linearly with the fraction of adversarially corrupted samples. Moreover, we develop a general recipe for detecting and correcting corruptions in high-dimensions, that may be applicable to many other problems.
  • In many scientific and engineering applications, we are tasked with the maximisation of an expensive to evaluate black box function $f$. Traditional settings for this problem assume just the availability of this single function. However, in many cases, cheap approximations to $f$ may be obtainable. For example, the expensive real world behaviour of a robot can be approximated by a cheap computer simulation. We can use these approximations to eliminate low function value regions cheaply and use the expensive evaluations of $f$ in a small but promising region and speedily identify the optimum. We formalise this task as a \emph{multi-fidelity} bandit problem where the target function and its approximations are sampled from a Gaussian process. We develop MF-GP-UCB, a novel method based on upper confidence bound techniques. In our theoretical analysis we demonstrate that it exhibits precisely the above behaviour, and achieves better regret than strategies which ignore multi-fidelity information. Empirically, MF-GP-UCB outperforms such naive strategies and other multi-fidelity methods on several synthetic and real experiments.
  • How should a firm allocate its limited interviewing resources to select the optimal cohort of new employees from a large set of job applicants? How should that firm allocate cheap but noisy resume screenings and expensive but in-depth in-person interviews? We view this problem through the lens of combinatorial pure exploration (CPE) in the multi-armed bandit setting, where a central learning agent performs costly exploration of a set of arms before selecting a final subset with some combinatorial structure. We generalize a recent CPE algorithm to the setting where arm pulls can have different costs and return different levels of information. We then prove theoretical upper bounds for a general class of arm-pulling strategies in this new setting. We apply our general algorithm to a real-world problem with combinatorial structure: incorporating diversity into university admissions. We take real data from admissions at one of the largest US-based computer science graduate programs and show that a simulation of our algorithm produces a cohort with hiring overall utility while spending comparable budget to the current admissions process at that university.
  • As one of the most important paradigms of recurrent neural networks, the echo state network (ESN) has been applied to a wide range of fields, from robotics to medicine, finance, and language processing. A key feature of the ESN paradigm is its reservoir --- a directed and weighted network of neurons that projects the input time series into a high dimensional space where linear regression or classification can be applied. Despite extensive studies, the impact of the reservoir network on the ESN performance remains unclear. Combining tools from physics, dynamical systems and network science, we attempt to open the black box of ESN and offer insights to understand the behavior of general artificial neural networks. Through spectral analysis of the reservoir network we reveal a key factor that largely determines the ESN memory capacity and hence affects its performance. Moreover, we find that adding short loops to the reservoir network can tailor ESN for specific tasks and optimize learning. We validate our findings by applying ESN to forecast both synthetic and real benchmark time series. Our results provide a new way to design task-specific ESN. More importantly, it demonstrates the power of combining tools from physics, dynamical systems and network science to offer new insights in understanding the mechanisms of general artificial neural networks.
  • A defining feature of sampling-based motion planning is the reliance on an implicit representation of the state space, which is enabled by a set of probing samples. Traditionally, these samples are drawn either probabilistically or deterministically to uniformly cover the state space. Yet, the motion of many robotic systems is often restricted to "small" regions of the state space, due to, for example, differential constraints or collision-avoidance constraints. To accelerate the planning process, it is thus desirable to devise non-uniform sampling strategies that favor sampling in those regions where an optimal solution might lie. This paper proposes a methodology for non-uniform sampling, whereby a sampling distribution is learned from demonstrations, and then used to bias sampling. The sampling distribution is computed through a conditional variational autoencoder, allowing sample generation from the latent space conditioned on the specific planning problem. This methodology is general, can be used in combination with any sampling-based planner, and can effectively exploit the underlying structure of a planning problem while maintaining the theoretical guarantees of sampling-based approaches. Specifically, on several planning problems, the proposed methodology is shown to effectively learn representations for the relevant regions of the state space, resulting in an order of magnitude improvement in terms of success rate and convergence to the optimal cost.
  • Machine learning (ML) techniques are increasingly common in security applications, such as malware and intrusion detection. However, ML models are often susceptible to evasion attacks, in which an adversary makes changes to the input (such as malware) in order to avoid being detected. A conventional approach to evaluate ML robustness to such attacks, as well as to design robust ML, is by considering simplified feature-space models of attacks, where the attacker changes ML features directly to effect evasion, while minimizing or constraining the magnitude of this change. We investigate the effectiveness of this approach to designing robust ML in the face of attacks that can be realized in actual malware (realizable attacks). We demonstrate that in the context of structure-based PDF malware detection, such techniques appear to have limited effectiveness, but they are effective with content-based detectors. In either case, we show that augmenting the feature space models with conserved features (those that cannot be unilaterally modified without compromising malicious functionality) significantly improves performance. Finally, we show that feature space models enable generalized robustness when faced with a variety of realizable attacks, as compared to classifiers which are tuned to be robust to a specific realizable attack.
  • We investigate metric learning in the context of dynamic time warping (DTW), the by far most popular dissimilarity measure used for the comparison and analysis of motion capture data. While metric learning enables a problem-adapted representation of data, the majority of methods has been proposed for vectorial data only. In this contribution, we extend the popular principle offered by the large margin nearest neighbors learner (LMNN) to DTW by treating the resulting component-wise dissimilarity values as features. We demonstrate that this principle greatly enhances the classification accuracy in several benchmarks. Further, we show that recent auxiliary concepts such as metric regularization can be transferred from the vectorial case to component-wise DTW in a similar way. We illustrate that metric regularization constitutes a crucial prerequisite for the interpretation of the resulting relevance profiles.
  • Deep learning-based techniques have achieved state-of-the-art performance on a wide variety of recognition and classification tasks. However, these networks are typically computationally expensive to train, requiring weeks of computation on many GPUs; as a result, many users outsource the training procedure to the cloud or rely on pre-trained models that are then fine-tuned for a specific task. In this paper we show that outsourced training introduces new security risks: an adversary can create a maliciously trained network (a backdoored neural network, or a \emph{BadNet}) that has state-of-the-art performance on the user's training and validation samples, but behaves badly on specific attacker-chosen inputs. We first explore the properties of BadNets in a toy example, by creating a backdoored handwritten digit classifier. Next, we demonstrate backdoors in a more realistic scenario by creating a U.S. street sign classifier that identifies stop signs as speed limits when a special sticker is added to the stop sign; we then show in addition that the backdoor in our US street sign detector can persist even if the network is later retrained for another task and cause a drop in accuracy of {25}\% on average when the backdoor trigger is present. These results demonstrate that backdoors in neural networks are both powerful and---because the behavior of neural networks is difficult to explicate---stealthy. This work provides motivation for further research into techniques for verifying and inspecting neural networks, just as we have developed tools for verifying and debugging software.
  • The key challenge in multiagent learning is learning a best response to the behaviour of other agents, which may be non-stationary: if the other agents adapt their strategy as well, the learning target moves. Disparate streams of research have approached non-stationarity from several angles, which make a variety of implicit assumptions that make it hard to keep an overview of the state of the art and to validate the innovation and significance of new works. This survey presents a coherent overview of work that addresses opponent-induced non-stationarity with tools from game theory, reinforcement learning and multi-armed bandits. Further, we reflect on the principle approaches how algorithms model and cope with this non-stationarity, arriving at a new framework and five categories (in increasing order of sophistication): ignore, forget, respond to target models, learn models, and theory of mind. A wide range of state-of-the-art algorithms is classified into a taxonomy, using these categories and key characteristics of the environment (e.g., observability) and adaptation behaviour of the opponents (e.g., smooth, abrupt). To clarify even further we present illustrative variations of one domain, contrasting the strengths and limitations of each category. Finally, we discuss in which environments the different approaches yield most merit, and point to promising avenues of future research.
  • We propose a simple yet effective technique for neural network learning. The forward propagation is computed as usual. In back propagation, only a small subset of the full gradient is computed to update the model parameters. The gradient vectors are sparsified in such a way that only the top-$k$ elements (in terms of magnitude) are kept. As a result, only $k$ rows or columns (depending on the layout) of the weight matrix are modified, leading to a linear reduction ($k$ divided by the vector dimension) in the computational cost. Surprisingly, experimental results demonstrate that we can update only 1-4% of the weights at each back propagation pass. This does not result in a larger number of training iterations. More interestingly, the accuracy of the resulting models is actually improved rather than degraded, and a detailed analysis is given. The code is available at https://github.com/lancopku/meProp
  • Inferring the relations between two images is an important class of tasks in computer vision. Examples of such tasks include computing optical flow and stereo disparity. We treat the relation inference tasks as a machine learning problem and tackle it with neural networks. A key to the problem is learning a representation of relations. We propose a new neural network module, contrast association unit (CAU), which explicitly models the relations between two sets of input variables. Due to the non-negativity of the weights in CAU, we adopt a multiplicative update algorithm for learning these weights. Experiments show that neural networks with CAUs are more effective in learning five fundamental image transformations than conventional neural networks.
  • Bipartite ranking is a fundamental machine learning and data mining problem. It commonly concerns the maximization of the AUC metric. Recently, a number of studies have proposed online bipartite ranking algorithms to learn from massive streams of class-imbalanced data. These methods suggest both linear and kernel-based bipartite ranking algorithms based on first and second-order online learning. Unlike kernelized ranker, linear ranker is more scalable learning algorithm. The existing linear online bipartite ranking algorithms lack either handling non-separable data or constructing adaptive large margin. These limitations yield unreliable bipartite ranking performance. In this work, we propose a linear online confidence-weighted bipartite ranking algorithm (CBR) that adopts soft confidence-weighted learning. The proposed algorithm leverages the same properties of soft confidence-weighted learning in a framework for bipartite ranking. We also develop a diagonal variation of the proposed confidence-weighted bipartite ranking algorithm to deal with high-dimensional data by maintaining only the diagonal elements of the covariance matrix. We empirically evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms on several benchmark and high-dimensional datasets. The experimental results validate the reliability of the proposed algorithms. The results also show that our algorithms outperform or are at least comparable to the competing online AUC maximization methods.
  • We study stochastic optimization of nonconvex loss functions, which are typical objectives for training neural networks. We propose stochastic approximation algorithms which optimize a series of regularized, nonlinearized losses on large minibatches of samples, using only first-order gradient information. Our algorithms provably converge to an approximate critical point of the expected objective with faster rates than minibatch stochastic gradient descent, and facilitate better parallelization by allowing larger minibatches.
  • Due to the size of data and the limited data storage space in a single local computer, data can often be stored in a distributed manner. In order to use the distributed big data in machine learning, performing large-scale machine learning from the distributed data through communication networks is inevitable. In this paper, we investigate the impact of network communication constraints on the convergence speed of distributed machine learning optimization algorithms. Firstly, we study the convergence rate of the distributed dual coordinate ascent in a general tree structured network, since every connected communication network can have a spanning tree, and a tree network can be understood as the generalization of a star network. Secondly, by considering network communication delays, we optimize the network-constrained dual coordinate ascent to maximize its convergence speed in terms of operation time. Through numerical experiments, we demonstrate that under different network communication delays, the delay-dependent number of local and global iterations in distributed dual coordinated ascent can play a significant role in the achievement of maximum convergence speed.
  • Ensembling multiple predictions is a widely used technique for improving the accuracy of various machine learning tasks. One obvious drawback of ensembling is its higher execution cost during inference. In this paper, we first describe our insights on the relationship between the probability of prediction and the effect of ensembling with current deep neural networks; ensembling does not help mispredictions for inputs predicted with a high probability even when there is a non-negligible number of mispredicted inputs. This finding motivated us to develop a way to adaptively control the ensembling. If the prediction for an input reaches a high enough probability, i.e., the output from the softmax function, on the basis of the confidence level, we stop ensembling for this input to avoid wasting computation power. We evaluated the adaptive ensembling by using various datasets and showed that it reduces the computation cost significantly while achieving accuracy similar to that of static ensembling using a pre-defined number of local predictions. We also show that our statistically rigorous confidence-level-based early-exit condition reduces the burden of task-dependent threshold tuning better compared with naive early exit based on a pre-defined threshold in addition to yielding a better accuracy with the same cost.