• Device-independent security is the gold standard for quantum cryptography: not only is security based entirely on the laws of quantum mechanics, but it holds irrespective of any a priori assumptions on the quantum devices used in a protocol, making it particularly applicable in a quantum-wary environment. While the existence of device-independent protocols for tasks such as randomness expansion and quantum key distribution has recently been established, the underlying proofs of security remain very challenging, yield rather poor key rates, and demand very high-quality quantum devices, thus making them all but impossible to implement in practice. We introduce a technique for the analysis of device-independent cryptographic protocols. We provide a flexible protocol and give a security proof that provides quantitative bounds that are asymptotically tight, even in the presence of general quantum adversaries. At a high level our approach amounts to establishing a reduction to the scenario in which the untrusted device operates in an identical and independent way in each round of the protocol. This is achieved by leveraging the sequential nature of the protocol, and makes use of a newly developed tool, the "entropy accumulation theorem" of Dupuis et al. As concrete applications we give simple and modular security proofs for device-independent quantum key distribution and randomness expansion protocols based on the CHSH inequality. For both tasks we establish essentially optimal asymptotic key rates and noise tolerance. In view of recent experimental progress, which has culminated in loophole-free Bell tests, it is likely that these protocols can be practically implemented in the near future.
  • We advance the state-of-the-art in automated symbolic analysis for e-voting protocols by introducing three conditions that together are sufficient to guarantee ballot secrecy. There are two main advantages to using our conditions, compared to existing automated approaches. The first is a substantial expansion of the class of protocols and threat models that can be automatically analysed: we can systematically deal with (a) honest authorities present in different phases, (b) threat models in which no dishonest voters occur, and (c) protocols whose ballot secrecy depends on fresh data coming from other phases. The second advantage is that it can significantly improve verification efficiency, as the individual conditions are often simpler to verify. E.g., for the LEE protocol, we obtain a speedup of over two orders of magnitude. We show the scope and effectiveness of our approach using ProVerif in several case studies, including FOO, LEE, JCJ, and Belenios. In these case studies, our approach does not yield any false attacks, suggesting that our conditions are tight.
  • Machine learning (ML) techniques are increasingly common in security applications, such as malware and intrusion detection. However, ML models are often susceptible to evasion attacks, in which an adversary makes changes to the input (such as malware) in order to avoid being detected. A conventional approach to evaluate ML robustness to such attacks, as well as to design robust ML, is by considering simplified feature-space models of attacks, where the attacker changes ML features directly to effect evasion, while minimizing or constraining the magnitude of this change. We investigate the effectiveness of this approach to designing robust ML in the face of attacks that can be realized in actual malware (realizable attacks). We demonstrate that in the context of structure-based PDF malware detection, such techniques appear to have limited effectiveness, but they are effective with content-based detectors. In either case, we show that augmenting the feature space models with conserved features (those that cannot be unilaterally modified without compromising malicious functionality) significantly improves performance. Finally, we show that feature space models enable generalized robustness when faced with a variety of realizable attacks, as compared to classifiers which are tuned to be robust to a specific realizable attack.
  • Deep learning-based techniques have achieved state-of-the-art performance on a wide variety of recognition and classification tasks. However, these networks are typically computationally expensive to train, requiring weeks of computation on many GPUs; as a result, many users outsource the training procedure to the cloud or rely on pre-trained models that are then fine-tuned for a specific task. In this paper we show that outsourced training introduces new security risks: an adversary can create a maliciously trained network (a backdoored neural network, or a \emph{BadNet}) that has state-of-the-art performance on the user's training and validation samples, but behaves badly on specific attacker-chosen inputs. We first explore the properties of BadNets in a toy example, by creating a backdoored handwritten digit classifier. Next, we demonstrate backdoors in a more realistic scenario by creating a U.S. street sign classifier that identifies stop signs as speed limits when a special sticker is added to the stop sign; we then show in addition that the backdoor in our US street sign detector can persist even if the network is later retrained for another task and cause a drop in accuracy of {25}\% on average when the backdoor trigger is present. These results demonstrate that backdoors in neural networks are both powerful and---because the behavior of neural networks is difficult to explicate---stealthy. This work provides motivation for further research into techniques for verifying and inspecting neural networks, just as we have developed tools for verifying and debugging software.
  • Modern authentication systems store hashed values of passwords of users using cryptographic hash functions. Therefore, to crack a password an attacker needs to guess a hash function input that is mapped to the hashed value, as opposed to the password itself. We call a hash function that maps the same number of inputs to each bin, as \textbf{unbiased}. However, cryptographic hash functions in use have not been proven to be unbiased (i.e., they may have an unequal number of inputs mapped to different bins). A cryptographic hash function has the property that it is computationally difficult to find an input mapped to a bin. In this work we introduce a structured notion of biased hash functions for which we analyze the average guesswork under certain types of brute force attacks. This work shows that the level of security depends on the set of hashed values of valid users as well as the statistical profile of a hash function, resulting from bias. We examine the average guesswork conditioned on the set of hashed values, and model the statistical profile through the empirical distribution of the number of inputs that are mapped to a bin. In particular, we focus on a class of statistical profiles (capturing the bias) , which we call type-class statistical profiles, that has an empirical distribution related to the probability of the type classes defined in the method of types. For such profiles, we show that the average guesswork is related to basic measures in information theory such as entropy and divergence. We use this to show that the effect of bias on the conditional average guesswork is limited compared to other system parameters such as the number of valid users who store their hashed passwords in the system.
  • In this paper we characterize the set of polynomials $f\in\mathbb F_q[X]$ satisfying the following property: there exists a positive integer $d$ such that for any positive integer $\ell$ less or equal than the degree of $f$, there exists $t_0$ in $\mathbb F_{q^d}$ such that the polynomial $f-t_0$ has an irreducible factor of degree $\ell$ over $\mathbb F_{q^d}[X]$. This result is then used to progress in the last step which is needed to remove the heuristic from one of the quasi-polynomial time algorithms for discrete logarithm problems (DLP) in small characteristic. Our characterization allows a construction of polynomials satisfying the wanted property. The method is general and can be used to tackle similar problems which involve factorization patterns of polynomials over finite fields.
  • State-of-the-art password guessing tools, such as HashCat and John the Ripper, enable users to check billions of passwords per second against password hashes. In addition to performing straightforward dictionary attacks, these tools can expand password dictionaries using password generation rules, such as concatenation of words (e.g., "password123456") and leet speak (e.g., "password" becomes "p4s5w0rd"). Although these rules work well in practice, expanding them to model further passwords is a laborious task that requires specialized expertise. To address this issue, in this paper we introduce PassGAN, a novel approach that replaces human-generated password rules with theory-grounded machine learning algorithms. Instead of relying on manual password analysis, PassGAN uses a Generative Adversarial Network (GAN) to autonomously learn the distribution of real passwords from actual password leaks, and to generate high-quality password guesses. Our experiments show that this approach is very promising. When we evaluated PassGAN on two large password datasets, we were able to surpass rule-based and state-of-the-art machine learning password guessing tools. However, in contrast with the other tools, PassGAN achieved this result without any a-priori knowledge on passwords or common password structures. Additionally, when we combined the output of PassGAN with the output of HashCat, we were able to match 51%-73% more passwords than with HashCat alone. This is remarkable, because it shows that PassGAN can autonomously extract a considerable number of password properties that current state-of-the art rules do not encode.
  • Data sharing among partners---users, organizations, companies---is crucial for the advancement of data analytics in many domains. Sharing through secure computation and differential privacy allows these partners to perform private computations on their sensitive data in controlled ways. However, in reality, there exist complex relationships among members. Politics, regulations, interest, trust, data demands and needs are one of the many reasons. Thus, there is a need for a mechanism to meet these conflicting relationships on data sharing. This paper presents Curie, an approach to exchange data among members whose membership has complex relationships. The CPL policy language that allows members to define the specifications of data exchange requirements is introduced. Members (partners) assert who and what to exchange through their local policies and negotiate a global sharing agreement. The agreement is implemented in a multi-party computation that guarantees sharing among members will comply with the policy as negotiated. The use of Curie is validated through an example of a health care application built on recently introduced secure multi-party computation and differential privacy frameworks, and policy and performance trade-offs are explored.
  • Gated Recurrent Unit (GRU) is a recently-developed variation of the long short-term memory (LSTM) unit, both of which are types of recurrent neural network (RNN). Through empirical evidence, both models have been proven to be effective in a wide variety of machine learning tasks such as natural language processing (Wen et al., 2015), speech recognition (Chorowski et al., 2015), and text classification (Yang et al., 2016). Conventionally, like most neural networks, both of the aforementioned RNN variants employ the Softmax function as its final output layer for its prediction, and the cross-entropy function for computing its loss. In this paper, we present an amendment to this norm by introducing linear support vector machine (SVM) as the replacement for Softmax in the final output layer of a GRU model. Furthermore, the cross-entropy function shall be replaced with a margin-based function. While there have been similar studies (Alalshekmubarak & Smith, 2013; Tang, 2013), this proposal is primarily intended for binary classification on intrusion detection using the 2013 network traffic data from the honeypot systems of Kyoto University. Results show that the GRU-SVM model performs relatively higher than the conventional GRU-Softmax model. The proposed model reached a training accuracy of ~81.54% and a testing accuracy of ~84.15%, while the latter was able to reach a training accuracy of ~63.07% and a testing accuracy of ~70.75%. In addition, the juxtaposition of these two final output layers indicate that the SVM would outperform Softmax in prediction time - a theoretical implication which was supported by the actual training and testing time in the study.
  • Capture the Flag (CTF) competitions are increasingly important for the Brazilian cybersecurity community as education and professional tools. Unfortunately, CTF platforms may suffer from security issues, giving an unfair advantage to competitors. To mitigate this, we propose NIZKCTF, the first open-audit CTF platform based on non-interactive zero-knowledge proofs.
  • We consider two basic algorithmic problems concerning tuples of (skew-)symmetric matrices. The first problem asks to decide, given two tuples of (skew-)symmetric matrices $(B_1, \dots, B_m)$ and $(C_1, \dots, C_m)$, whether there exists an invertible matrix $A$ such that for every $i\in\{1, \dots, m\}$, $A^tB_iA=C_i$. We show that this problem can be solved in randomized polynomial time over finite fields of odd size, the real field, and the complex field. The second problem asks to decide, given a tuple of square matrices $(B_1, \dots, B_m)$, whether there exist invertible matrices $A$ and $D$, such that for every $i\in\{1, \dots, m\}$, $AB_iD$ is (skew-)symmetric. We show that this problem can be solved in deterministic polynomial time over fields of characteristic not $2$. For both problems we exploit the structure of the underlying $*$-algebras, and utilize results and methods from the module isomorphism problem. Applications of our results range from multivariate cryptography, group isomorphism, to polynomial identity testing. Specifically, these results imply efficient algorithms for the following problems. (1) Test isomorphism of quadratic forms with one secret over a finite field of odd size. This problem belongs to a family of problems that serves as the security basis of certain authentication schemes proposed by Patarin (Eurocrypto 1996). (2) Test isomorphism of $p$-groups of class 2 and exponent $p$ ($p$ odd) with order $p^k$ in time polynomial in the group order, when the commutator subgroup is of order $p^{O(\sqrt{k})}$. (3) Deterministically reveal two families of singularity witnesses caused by the skew-symmetric structure, which represents a natural next step for the polynomial identity testing problem following the direction set up by the recent resolution of the non-commutative rank problem (Garg et al., FOCS 2016; Ivanyos et al., ITCS 2017).
  • Constructing a Pseudo Random Function (PRF) from a pseudorandom permutation is a fundamental problem in cryptology. Such a construction, implemented by truncating the last $m$ bits of permutations of $\{0, 1\}^{n}$ was suggested by Hall et al. (1998). They conjectured that the distinguishing advantage of an adversary with $q$ queries, ${\bf Adv}_{n, m} (q)$, is small if $q = o (2^{(n+m)/2})$, established an upper bound on ${\bf Adv}_{n, m} (q)$ that confirms the conjecture for $m < n/7$, and also declared a general lower bound ${\bf Adv}_{n,m}(q)=\Omega(q^2/2^{n+m})$. The conjecture was essentially confirmed by Bellare and Impagliazzo in 1999. Nevertheless, the problem of {\em estimating} ${\bf Adv}_{n, m} (q)$ remained open. Combining the trivial bound $1$, the birthday bound, and a result by Stam (1978) leads to the following upper bound: $${\bf Adv}_{n,m}(q) \le O\left(\min\left\{\frac{q^2}{2^n},\,\frac{q}{2^{\frac{n+m}{2}}},\,1\right\}\right)$$ In this paper we show that this upper bound is tight for every $m<n$ and $q>1$. This, in turn, verifies that the converse to the conjecture of Hall et al. is also correct, i.e., that ${\bf Adv}_{n, m} (q)$ is negligible only for $q = o (2^{(n+m)/2})$.
  • Many efficient data structures use randomness, allowing them to improve upon deterministic ones. Usually, their efficiency and correctness are analyzed using probabilistic tools under the assumption that the inputs and queries are independent of the internal randomness of the data structure. In this work, we consider data structures in a more robust model, which we call the adversarial model. Roughly speaking, this model allows an adversary to choose inputs and queries adaptively according to previous responses. Specifically, we consider a data structure known as "Bloom filter" and prove a tight connection between Bloom filters in this model and cryptography. A Bloom filter represents a set $S$ of elements approximately, by using fewer bits than a precise representation. The price for succinctness is allowing some errors: for any $x \in S$ it should always answer `Yes', and for any $x \notin S$ it should answer `Yes' only with small probability. In the adversarial model, we consider both efficient adversaries (that run in polynomial time) and computationally unbounded adversaries that are only bounded in the number of queries they can make. For computationally bounded adversaries, we show that non-trivial (memory-wise) Bloom filters exist if and only if one-way functions exist. For unbounded adversaries we show that there exists a Bloom filter for sets of size $n$ and error $\varepsilon$, that is secure against $t$ queries and uses only $O(n \log{\frac{1}{\varepsilon}}+t)$ bits of memory. In comparison, $n\log{\frac{1}{\varepsilon}}$ is the best possible under a non-adaptive adversary.
  • Galois field (GF) arithmetic is used to implement critical arithmetic components in communication and security-related hardware, and verification of such components is of prime importance. Current techniques for formally verifying such components are based on computer algebra methods that proved successful in verification of integer arithmetic circuits. However, these methods are sequential in nature and do not offer any parallelism. This paper presents an algebraic functional verification technique of gate-level GF (2m ) multipliers, in which verification is performed in bit-parallel fashion. The method is based on extracting a unique polynomial in Galois field of each output bit independently. We demonstrate that this method is able to verify an n-bit GF multiplier in n threads. Experiments performed on pre- and post-synthesized Mastrovito and Montgomery multipliers show high efficiency up to 571 bits.
  • Recent studies observe that app foreground is the most striking component that influences the access control decisions in mobile platform, as users tend to deny permission requests lacking visible evidence. However, none of the existing permission models provides a systematic approach that can automatically answer the question: Is the resource access indicated by app foreground? In this work, we present the design, implementation, and evaluation of COSMOS, a context-aware mediation system that bridges the semantic gap between foreground interaction and background access, in order to protect system integrity and user privacy. Specifically, COSMOS learns from a large set of apps with similar functionalities and user interfaces to construct generic models that detect the outliers at runtime. It can be further customized to satisfy specific user privacy preference by continuously evolving with user decisions. Experiments show that COSMOS achieves both high precision and high recall in detecting malicious requests. We also demonstrate the effectiveness of COSMOS in capturing specific user preferences using the decisions collected from 24 users and illustrate that COSMOS can be easily deployed on smartphones as a real-time guard with a very low performance overhead.
  • Advanced persistent threats (APTs) are stealthy attacks which make use of social engineering and deception to give adversaries insider access to networked systems. Against APTs, active defense technologies aim to create and exploit information asymmetry for defenders. In this paper, we study a scenario in which a powerful defender uses honeynets for active defense in order to observe an attacker who has penetrated the network. Rather than immediately eject the attacker, the defender may elect to gather information. We introduce an undiscounted, infinite-horizon Markov decision process on a continuous state space in order to model the defender's problem. We find a threshold of information that the defender should gather about the attacker before ejecting him. Then we study the robustness of this policy using a Stackelberg game. Finally, we simulate the policy for a conceptual network. Our results provide a quantitative foundation for studying optimal timing for attacker engagement in network defense.
  • In this article, we propose a new implementation of John von Neumann's middle square random number generator (RNG). A Weyl sequence is utilized to keep the generator running through a long period.
  • Recently, many studies have demonstrated deep neural network (DNN) classifiers can be fooled by the adversarial example, which is crafted via introducing some perturbations into an original sample. Accordingly, some powerful defense techniques were proposed. However, existing defense techniques often require modifying the target model or depend on the prior knowledge of attacks. In this paper, we propose a straightforward method for detecting adversarial image examples, which can be directly deployed into unmodified off-the-shelf DNN models. We consider the perturbation to images as a kind of noise and introduce two classic image processing techniques, scalar quantization and smoothing spatial filter, to reduce its effect. The image entropy is employed as a metric to implement an adaptive noise reduction for different kinds of images. Consequently, the adversarial example can be effectively detected by comparing the classification results of a given sample and its denoised version, without referring to any prior knowledge of attacks. More than 20,000 adversarial examples against some state-of-the-art DNN models are used to evaluate the proposed method, which are crafted with different attack techniques. The experiments show that our detection method can achieve a high overall F1 score of 96.39% and certainly raises the bar for defense-aware attacks.
  • In this paper, we present an effective method to craft text adversarial samples, revealing one important yet underestimated fact that DNN-based text classifiers are also prone to adversarial sample attack. Specifically, confronted with different adversarial scenarios, the text items that are important for classification are identified by computing the cost gradients of the input (white-box attack) or generating a series of occluded test samples (black-box attack). Based on these items, we design three perturbation strategies, namely insertion, modification, and removal, to generate adversarial samples. The experiment results show that the adversarial samples generated by our method can successfully fool both state-of-the-art character-level and word-level DNN-based text classifiers. The adversarial samples can be perturbed to any desirable classes without compromising their utilities. At the same time, the introduced perturbation is difficult to be perceived.
  • We present a new idea to design perfectly secure information exchange protocol, based on so called Deep Randomness, which means randomness relying on hidden probability distribution. Such idea drives us to introduce a new axiom in probability theory, thanks to which we can design a protocol, beyond Shannon limit, enabling two legitimate partners, sharing originally no common private information, to exchange secret information with accuracy as close as desired from perfection, and knowledge as close as desired from zero by any unlimitedly powered opponent.
  • Penetration testing is a well-established practical concept for the identification of potentially exploitable security weaknesses and an important component of a security audit. Providing a holistic security assessment for networks consisting of several hundreds hosts is hardly feasible though without some sort of mechanization. Mitigation, prioritizing counter-measures subject to a given budget, currently lacks a solid theoretical understanding and is hence more art than science. In this work, we propose the first approach for conducting comprehensive what-if analyses in order to reason about mitigation in a conceptually well-founded manner. To evaluate and compare mitigation strategies, we use simulated penetration testing, i.e., automated attack-finding, based on a network model to which a subset of a given set of mitigation actions, e.g., changes to the network topology, system updates, configuration changes etc. is applied. Using Stackelberg planning, we determine optimal combinations that minimize the maximal attacker success (similar to a Stackelberg game), and thus provide a well-founded basis for a holistic mitigation strategy. We show that these Stackelberg planning models can largely be derived from network scan, public vulnerability databases and manual inspection with various degrees of automation and detail, and we simulate mitigation analysis on networks of different size and vulnerability.
  • A pay-TV consumer uses a decoder to access encrypted digital content. To this end, the decoder contains a chip capable of decrypting the content if provisioned with the appropriate content decryption keys. A key establishment protocol is used to secure the delivery of the content decryption keys to the chip. This paper presents a new protocol and shows how the protocol can be applied in a pay-TV system. Compared to existing protocols, the presented solution reduces the risk that decoders need to be replaced in order to correct a security breach. The new protocol has recently been incorporated in an ETSI standard.
  • Administrative Role Based Access Control (ARBAC) models specify how to manage user-role assignments (URA), permission-role assignments (PRA), and role-role assignments (RRA). Many approaches have been proposed in the literature for URA, PRA, and RRA. In this paper, we propose a model for attribute-based role-role assignment (ARRA), a novel way to unify prior RRA approaches. We leverage the idea that attributes of various RBAC entities such as admin users and regular roles can be used to administer RRA in a highly flexible manner. We demonstrate that ARRA can express and unify prior RRA models.
  • Consensus is fundamental for distributed systems since it underpins key functionalities of such systems ranging from distributed information fusion, decision-making, to decentralized control. In order to reach an agreement, existing consensus algorithms require each agent to exchange explicit state information with its neighbors. This leads to the disclosure of private state information, which is undesirable in cases where privacy is of concern. In this paper, we propose a novel approach that enables secure and privacy-preserving average consensus in a decentralized architecture in the absence of an aggregator or third-party. By leveraging partial homomorphic cryptography to embed secrecy in pairwise interaction dynamics, our approach can guarantee consensus to the exact value in a deterministic manner without disclosing a node's state to its neighbors. In addition to enabling resilience to passive attackers aiming to steal state information, the approach also allows easy incorporation of defending mechanisms against active attackers which try to alter the content of exchanged messages. Furthermore, in contrast to existing noise-injection based privacy-preserving mechanisms which have to reconfigure the entire network when the topology or number of nodes varies, our approach is applicable to dynamic environments with time-varying coupling topologies. This secure and privacy-preservation approach is also applicable to weighted average consensus as well as maximum/minimum consensus under a new update rule. The approach is light-weight in computation and communication. Implementation details and numerical examples are provided to demonstrate the capability of our approach.
  • This paper defines The Dead Cryptographers Society Problem - DCS (where several great cryptographers created many polynomial-time Deterministic Turing Machines (DTMs) of a specific type, ran them on their proper descriptions concatenated with some arbitrary strings, deleted them and left only the results from those running, after they died: if those DTMs only permute and sometimes invert the bits on input, is it possible to decide the language formed by such resulting strings within polynomial time?), proves some facts about its computational complexity, and discusses some possible uses on Cryptography, such as into distance keys distribution, online reverse auction and secure communication.