• We introduce two new integral transforms of the quantum mechanical transition kernel that represent physical information about the path integral. These transforms can be interpreted as probability distributions on particle trajectories measuring respectively the relative contribution to the path integral from paths crossing a given spatial point (the hit function) and the likelihood of values of the line integral of the potential along a path in the ensemble (the path averaged potential).
  • Far-from equilibrium dynamics that lead to self-organization are highly relevant to complex dynamical systems not only in physics, but also in life-, earth-, and social sciences. It is challenging however to find systems with sufficiently controlled interactions that allow to model their emergent properties quantitatively. Here, we study a non-equilibrium phase transition and observe signatures of self-organized criticality in a dilute thermal vapour of atoms optically excited to strongly interacting Rydberg states. Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) provides excellent control over the population dynamics and enables high-resolution probing of the driven-dissipative system, which also exhibits phase bistability. Increased sensitivity compared to previous work allows reconstruct the system's phase diagram including the observation of its critical point. We observe that interaction-induced energy shifts and enhanced decay only occur in one of the phases above a critical Rydberg population. This limits the application of generic mean-field models, however a modified, threshold-dependent approach is in qualitative agreement with experimental data. Near the transition threshold, we observe self-organization dynamics as small fluctuations are sufficient to induce a phase transition.
  • Open physical systems with balanced loss and gain, described by non-Hermitian parity-time ($\mathcal{PT}$) reflection symmetric Hamiltonians, exhibit a transition which could engenders modes that exponentially decay or grow with time and thus spontaneously breaks the $\mathcal{PT}$-symmetry. Such $\mathcal{PT}$-symmetry breaking transitions have attracted many interests because of their extraordinary behaviors and functionalities absent in closed systems. Here we report on the observation of $\mathcal{PT}$-symmetry breaking transitions by engineering time-periodic dissipation and coupling, which are realized through state-dependent atom loss in an optical dipole trap of ultracold $^6$Li atoms. Comparing with a single transition appearing for static dissipation, the time-periodic counterpart undergoes $\mathcal{PT}$-symmetry breaking and restoring transitions at vanishingly small dissipation strength in both single and multiphoton transition domains, revealing rich phase structures associated to a Floquet open system. The results enable ultracold atoms to be a versatile tool for studying $\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric quantum systems.
  • The $^{27}$Al$^+$ ion optical clock is one of the most attractive optical clocks due to its own advantages, such as low blackbody radiation shift at room temperature and insensitive to the magnetic drift. However, it cannot be laser-cooled directly in the absence of 167 nm laser to date. This problem can be solved by sympathetic cooling. In this work, a linear Paul trap is used to trap both $^{40}$Ca$^{+}$ and $^{27}$Al$^+$ ions simultaneously, and a single Doppler-cooled $^{40}$Ca$^+$ ion is employed to sympathetically cool a single $^{27}$Al$^+$ ion. Thus a "bright-dark" two-ion crystal has been successfully synthesized. The temperature of the crystal has been estimated to be about 7 mK by measuring the ratio of carrier and sideband spectral intensities. Finally, the dark ion is proved to be an $^{27}$Al$^+$ ion by precise measuring of the ion crystal`s secular motion frequency, which means that it is a great step for our $^{27}$Al$^+$ quantum logic clock.
  • We report the results of a direct comparison of a freely expanding turbulent Bose-Einstein condensate and the propagation of an optical speckle pattern. We found remarkably similar statistical properties underlying the spatial propagation of both phenomena. The calculated second-order correlation together with the typical correlation length of each system is used to compare and substantiate our observations. We believe that the close analogy existing in between an expanding turbulent quantum gas and a traveling optical speckle, might burgeon into an exciting new research field investigating disordered quantum matter.
  • Quantum bits based on individual trapped atomic ions constitute a promising technology for building a quantum computer, with all the elementary operations having been achieved with the necessary precision for some error-correction schemes. However, the essential two-qubit logic gate used for generating quantum entanglement has hitherto always been performed in an adiabatic regime, where the gate is slow compared with the characteristic motional frequencies of ions in the trap, giving logic speeds of order 10kHz. There have been numerous proposals for performing gates faster than this natural "speed limit" of the trap. We implement the method of Steane et al., which uses tailored laser pulses: these are shaped on 10 ns timescales to drive the ions' motion along trajectories designed such that the gate operation is insensitive to optical phase fluctuations. This permits fast (MHz-rate) quantum logic which is robust to this important source of experimental error. We demonstrate entanglement generation for gate times as short as 480ns; this is less than a single oscillation period of an ion in the trap, and 8 orders of magnitude shorter than the memory coherence time measured in similar calcium-43 hyperfine qubits. The method's power is most evident at intermediate timescales, where it yields a gate error more than ten times lower than conventional techniques; for example, we achieve a 1.6 us gate with fidelity 99.8%. Still faster gates are possible at the price of higher laser intensity. The method requires only a single amplitude-shaped pulse and one pair of beams derived from a continuous-wave laser, and offers the prospect of combining the unrivalled coherence properties, operation fidelities and optical connectivity of trapped-ion qubits with the sub-microsecond logic speeds usually associated with solid state devices.
  • We perform high resolution spectroscopy on $^{176}$Lu$^+$ including the $^1S_0\leftrightarrow{^3}D_1$ and $^1S_0\leftrightarrow{^3}D_2$ clock transitions. Hyperfine structures and optical frequencies relative to the $^1S_0$ ground state of four low lying excited states are given to a few tens of kHz resolution. This covers the most relevant transitions involved in clock operation with this isotope. Additionally, measurements of the $^3D_2$ hyperfine structure may provide access to higher order nuclear moments, specifically the magnetic octupole and electric hexadecapole moments.
  • In this paper, a hypothesis that the cosmological gravitational potential can be measured with the use of high-precision atomic clocks is proposed and substantiated. The consideration is made with the use of a quasi-classical description of the gravitational shift that lies in the frame of nonmetric theories of gravity. It is assumed that the cosmological potential is formed by all matter of the Universe (including dark matter and dark energy) and that it is spatially uniform on planet scales. It is obvious that the cosmological potential, $\Phi_\text{CP}$, is several orders of magnitude greater than Earth's gravitational potential $\varphi_\text{E}$ (where $|\varphi_\text{E}/c^2|\sim 10^{-9}$ on Earth's surface). In our method, the tick rates of identical atomic clocks are compared at two points with different gravitational potentials, i.e. at different heights. In this case, the information on $\Phi_\text{CP}$ is contained in the cosmological correction $\alpha\neq 0$ in the relationship $\Delta\omega/\omega=(1+\alpha)\Delta \varphi/c^2$ between the relative change of the frequencies $\Delta \omega/\omega$ (in atomic clocks) and the difference of the gravitational potential $\Delta \varphi$ at the measurement points. We have estimated the low limit of cosmological correction, $\alpha >10^{-6}$. It is shown that using a modern atomic clock of the optical range it is possible to measure the value of $\alpha$ in earth-based experiments if $|\alpha|>10^{-5}$. The obtained results, in the case of their experimental confirmation, will open up new unique opportunities for the study of the Universe and the testing of various cosmological models. These results will also increase the measurement accuracy in relativistic geodesy, chronometric gravimetry, global navigation systems, and global networks of atomic clocks.
  • The measured radiative rates of the 2s22p2 3P1,2 - 2s2p3 5S{\deg}2 intercombination transitions in neutral carbon reported in the literature are critically evaluated by comparing them with theoretical and semi-empirical results. The experimental and theoretical values are compared for the carbon isoelectronic sequence from neutral carbon to nine-times ionized phosphorous. We find strong support for the currently recommended theoretical data on C I and conclude that the published measurements for this transition in neutral carbon cannot be trusted. The reasons for the discrepancies are not clear, and new experiments are needed.
  • Several extensions to the Standard Model of particle physics, including light dark matter candidates and unification theories, predict deviations from Newton's law of gravitation. For macroscopic distances, the inverse-square law of gravitation is well confirmed by astrophysical observations and laboratory experiments. At micrometer and shorter length scales, however, even the state-of-the-art constraints on deviations from gravitational interaction, whether provided by neutron scattering or precise measurements of forces between macroscopic bodies, are currently many orders of magnitude larger than gravity itself. Here we show that precision spectroscopy of weakly bound molecules can be used to constrain non-Newtonian interactions between atoms. A proof-of-principle demonstration using recent data from photoassociation spectroscopy of weakly bound Yb$_2$ molecules yields constraints on these new interactions that are already close to state-of-the-art neutron scattering experiments. At the same time, with the development of the recently proposed optical molecular clocks, the neutron scattering constraints could be surpassed by at least two orders of magnitude.
  • Many-particle entanglement is a fundamental concept of quantum physics that still presents conceptual challenges. While spin-squeezed and other nonclassical states of atomic ensembles were used to enhance measurement precision in quantum metrology, the notion of entanglement in these systems remained controversial because the correlations between the indistinguishable atoms were witnessed by collective measurements only. Here we use highresolution imaging to directly measure the spin correlations between spatially separated parts of a spin-squeezed Bose-Einstein condensate. We observe entanglement that is strong enough for Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steering: we can predict measurement outcomes for non-commuting observables in one spatial region based on a corresponding measurement in another region with an inferred uncertainty product below the Heisenberg relation. This could be exploited for entanglement-enhanced imaging of electromagnetic field distributions and quantum information tasks beyond metrology.
  • We report the realization of a robust and highly controllable two-dimensional (2D) spin-orbit (SO) coupling with topological non-trivial band structure. By applying a retro-reflected 2D optical lattice, phase tunable Raman couplings are formed into the anti-symmetric Raman lattice structure, and generate the 2D SO coupling with precise inversion and $C_4$ symmetries, leading to considerably enlarged topological regions. The life time of the 2D SO coupled Bose-Einstein condensate reaches several seconds, which enables the exploring of fine tuning interaction effects. These essential advantages of the present new realization open the door to explore exotic quantum many-body effects and non-equilibrium dynamics with novel topology.
  • We apply point-particle effective field theory (PPEFT) to electronic and muonic 4He+ ions, and use it to identify linear combinations of spectroscopic measurements for which the theoretical uncertainties are much smaller than for any particular energy levels. The error is reduced because these combinations are independent of all short-range physics effects up to a given order in the expansion in the small parameters R/a_B and(Z alpha) (where R and a_B are the ion's nuclear and Bohr radii). In particular, the theory error is not limited by the precision with which nuclear matrix elements can be computed, or compromised by the existence of any novel short-range interactions, should these exist. These combinations of 4He+ measurements therefore provide particularly precise tests of QED. The restriction to 4He+ arises because our analysis assumes a spherically symmetric nucleus, but the argument used is more general and extendable to both nuclei with spin, and to higher orders in R/a_B and (Z alpha).
  • In addition to mass, energy, and momentum, classical dissipationless flows conserve helicity, a measure of the topology of the flow. Helicity has far-reaching consequences for classical flows from Newtonian fluids to plasmas. Since superfluids flow without dissipation, a fundamental question is whether such a conserved quantity exists for superfluid flows. We address the existence of a "superfluid helicity" using an analytical approach based on the the symmetry underlying classical helicity conservation: the particle relabeling symmetry. Furthermore, we use numerical simulations to study whether bundles of superfluid vortices which approximate the structure of a classical vortex, recover the conservation of classical helicity and find dynamics consistent with classical vortices in a viscous fluid.
  • Hybrid systems of laser-cooled trapped ions and ultracold atoms combined in a single experimental setup have recently emerged as a new platform for fundamental research in quantum physics. This paper reviews the theoretical and experimental progress in research on cold hybrid ion-atom systems which aim to combine the best features of the two well-established fields. We provide a broad overview of the theoretical description of ion-atom mixtures and their applications, and report on advances in experiments with ions trapped in Paul or dipole traps overlapped with a cloud of cold atoms, and with ions directly produced in a Bose-Einstein condensate. We start with microscopic models describing the electronic structure, interactions, and collisional physics of ion-atom systems at low and ultralow temperatures, including radiative and non-radiative charge transfer processes and their control with magnetically tunable Feshbach resonances. Then we describe the relevant experimental techniques and the intrinsic properties of hybrid systems. In particular, we discuss the impact of the micromotion of ions in Paul traps on ion-atom hybrid systems. Next, we review recent proposals for using ions immersed in ultracold gases for studying cold collisions, chemistry, many-body physics, quantum simulation, and quantum computation and their experimental realizations. In the last part we focus on the formation of molecular ions via spontaneous radiative association, photoassociation, magnetoassociation, and sympathetic cooling. We discuss applications and prospects of cold molecular ions for cold controlled chemistry and precision spectroscopy.
  • Entanglement not only plays a crucial role in quantum technologies, but is key to our understanding of quantum correlations in many-body systems. However, in an experiment, the only way of measuring entanglement in a generic mixed state is through reconstructive quantum tomography, requiring an exponential number of measurements in the system size. Here, we propose a machine learning assisted scheme to measure the entanglement between arbitrary subsystems of size $N_A$ and $N_B$, with $\mathcal{O}(N_A + N_B)$ measurements, and without any prior knowledge of the state. The method exploits a neural network to learn the unknown, non-linear function relating certain measurable moments and the logarithmic negativity. Our procedure will allow entanglement measurements in a wide variety of systems, including strongly interacting many body systems in both equilibrium and non-equilibrium regimes.
  • We consider a hydrogen atom confined in time-dependent trap created by a spherical impenetrable box with time-dependent radius. For such model we study the behavior of atomic electron under the (non-adiabatic) dynamical confinement caused by the rapidly moving wall of the box. The expectation values of the total and kinetic energy, average force, pressure and coordinate are analyzed as a function of time for linearly expanding, contracting and harmonically breathing boxes. It is shown that linearly extending box leads to de-excitation of the atom, while the rapidly contracting box causes the creation of very high pressure on the atom and transition of the atomic electron into the unbound state. In harmonically breathing box diffusive excitation of atomic electron may occur in analogy with that for atom in a microwave field.
  • Reradiation of a spatially non-uniform ultrashort electromagnetic pulse interacting with the linear chain of multielectron atoms is studied in the framework of sudden perturbation approximation. Angular distributions of the reradiation spectrum for arbitrary number of atoms are obtained. It is shown that interference effects for the photon radiation amplitudes lead to appearing of "diffraction" maximums. The obtained results can be extended to the case of two- and three-dimensional crystal lattices and atomic chains. The approach developed allows also to take into account thermal vibrations of the lattice atoms.
  • During the ionization of atoms irradiated by linearly polarized intense laser fields, we find for the first time that the transverse momentum distribution of photoelectrons can be well fitted by a squared zeroth-order Bessel function because of the quantum interference effect of Glory rescattering. The characteristic of the Bessel function is determined by the common angular momentum of a bunch of semiclassical paths termed as Glory trajectories, which are launched with different nonzero initial transverse momenta distributed on a specific circle in the momentum plane and finally deflected to the same asymptotic momentum, which is along the polarization direction, through post-tunneling rescattering. Glory rescattering theory (GRT) based on the semiclassical path-integral formalism is developed to address this effect quantitatively. Our theory can resolve the long-standing discrepancies between existing theories and experiments on the fringe location, predict the sudden transition of the fringe structure in holographic patterns, and shed light on the quantum interference aspects of low-energy structures in strong-field atomic ionization.
  • We provide an up to date summary of the theory contributions to the 2S-2P Lamb shift and the fine structure of the 2P state in the muonic helium ion $(\mathrm{\mu^4He})^+$. This summary serves as the basis for the extraction of the alpha particle charge radius from the muonic helium Lamb shift measurements at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland. Individual theory contributions needed for a charge radius extraction are compared and compiled into a consistent summary. The influence of the alpha particle charge distribution on the elastic two-photon exchange is studied to take into account possible model-dependencies of the energy levels on the electric form factor of the nucleus. We also discuss the theory uncertainty which enters the extraction of the $\mathrm{^3He-^4He}$ isotope shift from the muonic measurements. The theory uncertainty of the extraction is much smaller than a present discrepancy between previous isotope shift measurements. This work completes our series of $n=2$ theory compilations in light muonic atoms which we have performed already for muonic hydrogen, deuterium, and helium-3 ions.
  • We demonstrate the use of spatial emission patterns to measure the magnetic fields used in a magneto-optical trap. The directional aspect of the Hanle effect gives a direct, visual presentation of the magnetic fields, in which brighter fluorescence indicates larger fields. It can be used to determine the direction as well as the magnitude of the field. It is particularly well suited for characterizing and aligning magneto-optical traps, requiring little additional equipment or setup beyond what is ordinarily used in a magneto-optical trap, and being most sensitive to fields of the size typically present in a magneto-optical trap.
  • Collective effects in deformed atomic nuclei present possible avenues of study on the non-spherical distribution of neutrons and the violation of the local Lorentz invariance. We introduce the weak quadrupole moment of nuclei, related to the quadrupole distribution of the weak charge in the nucleus. The weak quadrupole moment produces tensor weak interaction between the nucleus and electrons and can be observed in atomic and molecular experiments measuring parity nonconservation. The dominating contribution to the weak quadrupole is given by the quadrupole moment of the neutron distribution, therefore, corresponding experiments should allow one to measure the neutron quadrupoles. Using the deformed oscillator model and the Schmidt model we calculate the quadrupole distributions of neutrons, $Q_{n}$, the weak quadrupole moments ,$Q_{W}^{(2)}$, and the Lorentz Innvariance violating energy shifts in $^{9}$Be, $^{21}$Ne , $^{27}$Al, $^{131}$Xe, $^{133}$Cs, $^{151}$Eu, $^{153}$Eu, $^{163}$Dy, $^{167}$Er, $^{173}$Yb, $^{177}$Hf, $^{179}$Hf, $^{181}$Ta, $^{201}$Hg and $^{229}$Th.
  • We describe a novel technique for creating an artificial magnetic field for ultra-cold atoms using a periodically pulsed pair of counter propagating Raman lasers that drive transitions between a pair of internal atomic spin states: a multi-frequency coupling term. In conjunction with a magnetic field gradient, this dynamically generates a rectangular lattice with a non-staggered magnetic flux. For a wide range of parameters, the resulting Bloch bands have non-trivial topology, reminiscent of Landau levels, as quantified by their Chern numbers.
  • Calculations of the magnetic hyperfine structure rely on the input of nuclear properties -- nuclear magnetic moments and nuclear magnetization distributions -- as well as quantum electrodynamic (QED) radiative corrections for high-accuracy evaluation in heavy atoms. The uncertainties associated with assumed values of these properties limit the accuracy of hyperfine calculations. For example, for the heavy alkali-metal atoms Cs and Fr, these uncertainties may amount collectively to almost 1\% or 2\%, respectively. In this paper we propose a method for removing the dependence of hyperfine structure calculations on assumed values of nuclear magnetic moments and nuclear magnetization distributions by determining these effects empirically from measurements of the hyperfine structure for high states. The method is valid for $s$, $p_{1/2}$, and $p_{3/2}$ states of alkali-metal atoms and alkali-metal-like ions. We have shown that for $s$ states the dependence on QED effects may also be removed to high accuracy. The ability to probe the electronic wave functions, through hyperfine comparisons, with significantly increased accuracy is important for the analysis of atomic parity violation measurements and may enable the accuracy of atomic parity violation calculations to be improved. More broadly, it opens the way for further development of high-precision atomic many-body methods.
  • A permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of a particle or system is a separation of charge along its angular-momentum axis and is a direct signal of T-violation and, assuming CPT symmetry, CP violation. For over sixty years EDMs have been studied, first as a signal of a parity-symmetry violation and then as a signal of CP violation that would clarify its role in nature and in theory. Contemporary motivations include the role that CP violation plays in explaining the cosmological matter-antimatter asymmetry and the search for new physics. Experiments on a variety of systems have become ever-more sensitive, but provide only upper limits on EDMs, and theory at several scales is crucial to interpret these limits. Nuclear theory provides connections from Standard-Model and Beyond-Standard-Model physics to the observable EDMs, and atomic and molecular theory reveal how CP-violation is manifest in these systems. EDM results in hadronic systems require that the Standard Model QCD parameter of $\bar\theta$ must be exceptionally small, which could be explained by the existence of axions - also a candidate dark-matter particle. Theoretical results on electroweak baryogenesis show that new physics is needed to explain the dominance of matter in the universe. Experimental and theoretical efforts continue to expand with new ideas and new questions, and this review provides a broad overview of theoretical motivations and interpretations as well as details about experimental techniques, experiments, and prospects. The intent is to provide specifics and context as this exciting field moves forward.