• We propose a general framework for nonasymptotic covariance matrix estimation making use of concentration inequality-based confidence sets. We specify this framework for the estimation of large sparse covariance matrices through incorporation of past thresholding estimators with key emphasis on support recovery. This technique goes beyond past results for thresholding estimators by allowing for a wide range of distributional assumptions beyond merely sub-Gaussian tails. This methodology can furthermore be adapted to a wide range of other estimators and settings. The usage of nonasymptotic dimension-free confidence sets yields good theoretical performance. Through extensive simulations, it is demonstrated to have superior performance when compared with other such methods. In the context of support recovery, we are able to specify a false positive rate and optimize to maximize the true recoveries.
  • We show that several machine learning estimators, including square-root LASSO (Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection) and regularized logistic regression can be represented as solutions to distributionally robust optimization (DRO) problems. The associated uncertainty regions are based on suitably defined Wasserstein distances. Hence, our representations allow us to view regularization as a result of introducing an artificial adversary that perturbs the empirical distribution to account for out-of-sample effects in loss estimation. In addition, we introduce RWPI (Robust Wasserstein Profile Inference), a novel inference methodology which extends the use of methods inspired by Empirical Likelihood to the setting of optimal transport costs (of which Wasserstein distances are a particular case). We use RWPI to show how to optimally select the size of uncertainty regions, and as a consequence, we are able to choose regularization parameters for these machine learning estimators without the use of cross validation. Numerical experiments are also given to validate our theoretical findings.
  • The global sensitivity analysis of a numerical model aims to quantify, by means of sensitivity indices estimate, the contributions of each uncertain input variable to the model output uncertainty. The so-called Sobol' indices, which are based on the functional variance analysis, present a difficult interpretation in the presence of statistical dependence between inputs. The Shapley effect was recently introduced to overcome this problem as they allocate the mutual contribution (due to correlation and interaction) of a group of inputs to each individual input within the group.In this paper, using several new analytical results, we study the effects of linear correlation between some Gaussian input variables on Shapley effects, and compare these effects to classical first-order and total Sobol' indices.This illustrates the interest, in terms of sensitivity analysis setting and interpretation, of the Shapley effects in the case of dependent inputs. For the practical issue of computationally demanding computer models, we show that the substitution of the original model by a metamodel (here, kriging) makes it possible to estimate these indices with precision at a reasonable computational cost.
  • The inductive size bias coupling technique and Stein's method yield a Berry-Esseen theorem for the number of urns having occupancy $d \ge 2$ when $n$ balls are uniformly distributed over $m$ urns. In particular, there exists a constant $C$ depending only on $d$ such that $$ \sup_{z \in \mathbb{R}}|P(W_{n,m} \le z) -P(Z \le z)| \le C \left( \frac{1+(\frac{n}{m})^3}{\sigma_{n,m}} \right) \quad \mbox{for all $n \ge d$ and $m \ge 2$,} $$ where $W_{n,m}$ and $\sigma_{n,m}^2$ are the standardized count and variance, respectively, of the number of urns with $d$ balls, and $Z$ is a standard normal random variable. Asymptotically, the bound is optimal up to constants if $n$ and $m$ tend to infinity together in a way such that $n/m$ stays bounded.
  • Information theory is a mathematical theory of learning with deep connections with topics as diverse as artificial intelligence, statistical physics, and biological evolution. Many primers on information theory paint a broad picture with relatively little mathematical sophistication, while many others develop specific application areas in detail. In contrast, these informal notes aim to outline some elements of the information-theoretic "way of thinking," by cutting a rapid and interesting path through some of the theory's foundational concepts and results. They are aimed at practicing systems scientists who are interested in exploring potential connections between information theory and their own fields. The main mathematical prerequisite for the notes is comfort with elementary probability, including sample spaces, conditioning, and expectations. We take the Kullback-Leibler divergence as our most basic concept, and then proceed to develop the entropy and mutual information. We discuss some of the main results, including the Chernoff bounds as a characterization of the divergence; Gibbs' Theorem; and the Data Processing Inequality. A recurring theme is that the definitions of information theory support natural theorems that sound ``obvious'' when translated into English. More pithily, ``information theory makes common sense precise.'' Since the focus of the notes is not primarily on technical details, proofs are provided only where the relevant techniques are illustrative of broader themes. Otherwise, proofs and intriguing tangents are referenced in liberally-sprinkled footnotes. The notes close with a highly nonexhaustive list of references to resources and other perspectives on the field.
  • We analyze the asymptotic behavior of the Bayesian generalization error in the topic model. Through a theoretical analysis of the maximum pole of the zeta function (real log canonical threshold) of the topic model, we obtain an upper bound of the Bayesian generalization error and the free energy in the topic model and stochastic matrix factorization (SMF; it can be regarded as a restriction of the non-negative matrix factorization). We show that the generalization error in the topic model and SMF becomes smaller than that of regular statistical models if Bayesian inference is attained.
  • We study full Bayesian procedures for sparse linear regression when errors have a symmetric but otherwise unknown distribution. The unknown error distribution is endowed with a symmetrized Dirichlet process mixture of Gaussians. For the prior on regression coefficients, a mixture of point masses at zero and continuous distributions is considered. We study behavior of the posterior with diverging number of predictors. Conditions are provided for consistency in the mean Hellinger distance. The compatibility and restricted eigenvalue conditions yield the minimax convergence rate of the regression coefficients in $\ell_1$- and $\ell_2$-norms, respectively. The convergence rate is adaptive to both the unknown sparsity level and the unknown symmetric error density under compatibility conditions. In addition, strong model selection consistency and a semi-parametric Bernstein-von Mises theorem are proven under slightly stronger conditions.
  • We develop singular value shrinkage priors for the mean matrix parameters in the matrix-variate Normal model with known covariance matrices. Introduced priors are superharmonic and put more weight on matrices with smaller singular values. They are a natural generalization of the Stein prior. Bayes estimators and Bayesian predictive densities based on introduced priors are minimax and dominate those based on the uniform prior in finite samples. The risk reduction is large when the true value of the parameter has small singular values. In particular, introduced priors perform stably well in the low rank case. We apply this result to multivariate linear regression problems by considering priors depending on the future samples. Introduced priors are compatible with reduced-rank regression.
  • Weighting the p-values is a well-established strategy that improves the power of multiple testing procedures while dealing with heterogeneous data. However, how to achieve this task in an optimal way is rarely considered in the literature. This paper contributes to fill the gap in the case of group-structured null hypotheses, by introducing a new class of procedures named ADDOW (for Adaptive Data Driven Optimal Weighting) that adapts both to the alternative distribution and to the proportion of true null hypotheses. We prove the asymptotical FDR control and power optimality among all weighted procedures of ADDOW, which shows that it dominates all existing procedures in that framework. Some numerical experiments show that the proposed method preserves its optimal properties in the finite sample setting when the number of tests is moderately large.
  • A new test of normality based on a standardised empirical process is introduced in this article. The first step is to introduce a Cram\'er-von Mises type statistic with weights equal to the inverse of the standard normal density function supported on a symmetric interval $[-a_n,a_n]$ depending on the sample size $n.$ The sequence of end points $a_n$ tends to infinity, and is chosen so that the statistic goes to infinity at the speed of $\ln \ln n.$ After substracting the mean, a suitable test statistic is obtained, with the same asymptotic law as the well-known Shapiro-Wilk statistic. The performance of the new test is described and compared with three other well-known tests of normality, namely, Shapiro-Wilk, Anderson-Darling and that of del Barrio-Matr\'an, Cuesta Albertos, and Rodr\'{\i}guez Rodr\'{\i}guez, by means of power calculations under many alternative hypotheses.
  • Many theoretical results for the lasso require the samples to be iid. Recent work has provided guarantees for the lasso assuming that the time series is generated by a sparse Vector Auto-Regressive (VAR) model with Gaussian innovations. Proofs of these results rely critically on the fact that the true data generating mechanism (DGM) is a finite-order Gaussian VAR. This assumption is quite brittle: linear transformations, including selecting a subset of variables, can lead to the violation of this assumption. In order to break free from such assumptions, we derive non-asymptotic inequalities for estimation error and prediction error of the lasso estimate of the best linear predictor without assuming any special parametric form of the DGM. Instead, we rely only on (strict) stationarity and geometrically decaying \b{eta}-mixing coefficients to establish error bounds for the lasso for subweibull random vectors. The class of subweibull random variables that we introduce includes subgaussian and subexponential random variables but also includes random variables with tails heavier than an exponential. We also show that, for Gaussian processes, the \b{eta}-mixing condition can be relaxed to summability of the {\alpha}-mixing coefficients. Our work provides an alternative proof of the consistency of the lasso for sparse Gaussian VAR models. But the applicability of our results extends to non-Gaussian and non-linear times series models as the examples we provide demonstrate.
  • We consider the problem of graph matchability in non-identically distributed networks. In a general class of edge-independent networks, we demonstrate that graph matchability can be lost with high probability when matching the networks directly. We further demonstrate that under mild model assumptions, matchability is almost perfectly recovered by centering the networks using Universal Singular Value Thresholding before matching. These theoretical results are then demonstrated in both real and synthetic simulation settings. We also recover analogous core-matchability results in a very general core-junk network model, wherein some vertices do not correspond between the graph pair.
  • We extend the Granger-Johansen representation theorems for I(1) and I(2) vector autoregressive processes to accommodate processes that take values in an arbitrary complex separable Hilbert space. This more general setting is of central relevance for statistical applications involving functional time series. We first obtain a range of necessary and sufficient conditions for a pole in the inverse of a holomorphic index-zero Fredholm operator pencil to be of first or second order. Those conditions form the basis for our development of I(1) and I(2) representations of autoregressive Hilbertian processes. Cointegrating and attractor subspaces are characterized in terms of the behavior of the autoregressive operator pencil in a neighborhood of one.
  • Kriging based on Gaussian random fields is widely used in reconstructing unknown functions. The kriging method has pointwise predictive distributions which are computationally simple. However, in many applications one would like to predict for a range of untried points simultaneously. In this work we obtain some error bounds for the (simple) kriging predictor under the uniform metric. It works for a scattered set of input points in an arbitrary dimension, and also covers the case where the covariance function of the Gaussian process is misspecified. These results lead to a better understanding of the rate of convergence of kriging under the Gaussian or the Mat\'ern correlation functions, the relationship between space-filling designs and kriging models, and the robustness of the Mat\'ern correlation functions.
  • In this paper, a regularization of Wasserstein barycenters for random measures supported on $\mathbb{R}^{d}$ is introduced via convex penalization. The existence and uniqueness of such barycenters is first proved for a large class of penalization functions. The Bregman divergence associated to the penalization term is then considered to obtain a stability result on penalized barycenters. This allows the comparison of data made of $n$ absolutely continuous probability measures, within the more realistic setting where one only has access to a dataset of random variables sampled from unknown distributions. The convergence of the penalized empirical barycenter of a set of $n$ iid random probability measures towards its population counterpart is finally analyzed. This approach is shown to be appropriate for the statistical analysis of either discrete or absolutely continuous random measures. It also allows to construct, from a set of discrete measures, consistent estimators of population Wasserstein barycenters that are absolutely continuous.
  • We consider the problem of recovering linear image $Bx$ of a signal $x$ known to belong to a given convex compact set ${\cal X}$ from indirect observation $\omega=Ax+\xi$ of $x$ corrupted by random noise $\xi$ with finite covariance matrix. It is shown that under some assumptions on ${\cal X}$ (satisfied, e.g., when ${\cal X}$ is the intersection of $K$ concentric ellipsoids/elliptic cylinders, or the unit ball of the spectral norm in the space of matrices) and on the norm $\|\cdot\|$ used to measure the recovery error (satisfied, e.g., by $\|\cdot\|_p$-norms, $1\leq p\leq 2$, on ${\mathbf{R}}^m$ and by the nuclear norm on the space of matrices), one can build, in a computationally efficient manner, a "presumably good" linear in observations estimate, and that in the case of zero mean Gaussian observation noise, this estimate is near-optimal among all (linear and nonlinear) estimates in terms of its worst-case, over $x\in {\cal X}$, expected $\|\cdot\|$-loss. These results form an essential extension of those in our paper arXiv:1602.01355, where the assumptions on ${\cal X}$ were more restrictive, and the norm $\|\cdot\|$ was assumed to be the Euclidean one. In addition, we develop near-optimal estimates for the case of "uncertain-but-bounded" noise, where all we know about $\xi$ is that it is bounded in a given norm by a given $\sigma$. Same as in arXiv:1602.01355, our results impose no restrictions on $A$ and $B$. This arXiv paper slightly strengthens the journal publication Juditsky, A., Nemirovski, A. "Near-Optimality of Linear Recovery from Indirect Observations," Mathematical Statistics and Learning 1:2 (2018), 171-225.
  • Consider the multivariate nonparametric regression model. It is shown that estimators based on sparsely connected deep neural networks with ReLU activation function and properly chosen network architecture achieve the minimax rates of convergence (up to $\log n$-factors) under a general composition assumption on the regression function. The framework includes many well-studied structural constraints such as (generalized) additive models. While there is a lot of flexibility in the network architecture, the tuning parameter is the sparsity of the network. Specifically, we consider large networks with number of potential network parameters exceeding the sample size. The analysis gives some insights into why multilayer feedforward neural networks perform well in practice. Interestingly, for ReLU activation function the depth (number of layers) of the neural network architectures plays an important role and our theory suggests that for nonparametric regression, scaling the network depth with the sample size is natural. It is also shown that under the composition assumption wavelet estimators can only achieve suboptimal rates.
  • We study high-dimensional distribution learning in an agnostic setting where an adversary is allowed to arbitrarily corrupt an $\varepsilon$-fraction of the samples. Such questions have a rich history spanning statistics, machine learning and theoretical computer science. Even in the most basic settings, the only known approaches are either computationally inefficient or lose dimension-dependent factors in their error guarantees. This raises the following question:Is high-dimensional agnostic distribution learning even possible, algorithmically? In this work, we obtain the first computationally efficient algorithms with dimension-independent error guarantees for agnostically learning several fundamental classes of high-dimensional distributions: (1) a single Gaussian, (2) a product distribution on the hypercube, (3) mixtures of two product distributions (under a natural balancedness condition), and (4) mixtures of spherical Gaussians. Our algorithms achieve error that is independent of the dimension, and in many cases scales nearly-linearly with the fraction of adversarially corrupted samples. Moreover, we develop a general recipe for detecting and correcting corruptions in high-dimensions, that may be applicable to many other problems.
  • A methodology is developed for data analysis based on empirically constructed geodesic metric spaces. For a probability distribution, the length along a path between two points can be defined as the amount of probability mass accumulated along the path. The geodesic, then, is the shortest such path and defines a geodesic metric. Such metrics are transformed in a number of ways to produce parametrised families of geodesic metric spaces, empirical versions of which allow computation of intrinsic means and associated measures of dispersion. These reveal properties of the data, based on geometry, such as those that are difficult to see from the raw Euclidean distances. Examples of application include clustering and classification. For certain parameter ranges, the spaces become CAT(0) spaces and the intrinsic means are unique. In one case, a minimal spanning tree of a graph based on the data becomes CAT(0). In another, a so-called "metric cone" construction allows extension to CAT($k$) spaces. It is shown how to empirically tune the parameters of the metrics, making it possible to apply them to a number of real cases.
  • We tackle the change-point problem with data belonging to a general set. We build a penalty for choosing the number of change-points in the kernel-based method of Harchaoui and Capp{\'e} (2007). This penalty generalizes the one proposed by Lebarbier (2005) for one-dimensional signals. We prove a non-asymptotic oracle inequality for the proposed method, thanks to a new concentration result for some function of Hilbert-space valued random variables. Experiments on synthetic data illustrate the accuracy of our method, showing that it can detect changes in the whole distribution of data, even when the mean and variance are constant.
  • We study the problem of variable selection for linear models under the high-dimensional asymptotic setting, where the number of observations $n$ grows at the same rate as the number of predictors $p$. We consider two-stage variable selection techniques (TVS) in which the first stage uses bridge estimators to obtain an estimate of the regression coefficients, and the second stage simply thresholds this estimate to select the "important" predictors. The asymptotic false discovery proportion (AFDP) and true positive proportion (ATPP) of these TVS are evaluated. We prove that for a fixed ATPP, in order to obtain a smaller AFDP, one should pick a bridge estimator with smaller asymptotic mean square error in the first stage of TVS. Based on such principled discovery, we present a sharp comparison of different TVS, via an in-depth investigation of the estimation properties of bridge estimators. Rather than "order-wise" error bounds with loose constants, our analysis focuses on precise error characterization. Various interesting signal-to-noise ratio and sparsity settings are studied. Our results offer new and thorough insights into high-dimensional variable selection. For instance, we prove that a TVS with Ridge in its first stage outperforms TVS with other bridge estimators in large noise settings; two-stage LASSO becomes inferior when the signal is rare and weak. As a by-product, we show that two-stage methods outperform some standard variable selection techniques, such as LASSO and Sure Independence Screening, under certain conditions.
  • There is a growing need for the ability to analyse interval-valued data. However, existing descriptive frameworks to achieve this ignore the process by which interval-valued data are typically constructed; namely by the aggregation of real-valued data generated from some underlying process. In this article we develop the foundations of likelihood based statistical inference for random intervals that directly incorporates the underlying generative procedure into the analysis. That is, it permits the direct fitting of models for the underlying real-valued data given only the random interval-valued summaries. This generative approach overcomes several problems associated with existing methods, including the rarely satisfied assumption of within-interval uniformity. The new methods are illustrated by simulated and real data analyses.
  • We study the detection problem of finding planted solutions in random instances of flat satisfiability problems, a generalization of boolean satisfiability formulas. We describe the properties of random instances of flat satisfiability, as well of the optimal rates of detection of the associated hypothesis testing problem. We also study the performance of an algorithmically efficient testing procedure. We introduce a modification of our model, the light planting of solutions, and show that it is as hard as the problem of learning parity with noise. This hints strongly at the difficulty of detecting planted flat satisfiability for a wide class of tests.
  • We show that prediction performance for global-local shrinkage regression can overcome two major difficulties of global shrinkage regression: (i) the amount of relative shrinkage is monotone in the singular values of the design matrix and (ii) the shrinkage is determined by a single tuning parameter. Specifically, we show that the horseshoe regression, with heavy-tailed component-specific local shrinkage parameters, in conjunction with a global parameter providing shrinkage towards zero, alleviates both these difficulties and consequently, results in an improved risk for prediction. Numerical demonstrations of improved prediction over competing approaches in simulations and in a pharmacogenomics data set confirm our theoretical findings.
  • We consider the challenging problem of statistical inference for exponential-family random graph models based on a single observation of a random graph with complex dependence. To facilitate statistical inference, we consider random graphs with additional structure in the form of block structure. We have shown elsewhere that when the block structure is known, it facilitates consistency results for $M$-estimators of canonical and curved exponential-family random graph models with complex dependence, such as transitivity. In practice, the block structure is known in some applications (e.g., multilevel networks), but is unknown in others. When the block structure is unknown, the first and foremost question is whether it can be recovered with high probability based on a single observation of a random graph with complex dependence. The main consistency results of the paper show that it is possible to do so under weak dependence and smoothness conditions. These results confirm that exponential-family random graph models with block structure constitute a promising direction of statistical network analysis.