• The phenomenon of many-body localised (MBL) systems has attracted significant interest in recent years, for its intriguing implications from a perspective of both condensed-matter and statistical physics: they are insulators even at non-zero temperature and fail to thermalise, violating expectations from quantum statistical mechanics. What is more, recent seminal experimental developments with ultra-cold atoms in optical lattices constituting analog quantum simulators have pushed many-body localised systems into the realm of physical systems that can be measured with high accuracy. In this work, we introduce experimentally accessible witnesses that directly probe distinct features of MBL, distinguishing it from its Anderson counterpart. We insist on building our toolbox from techniques available in the laboratory, including on-site addressing, super-lattices, and time-of-flight measurements, identifying witnesses based on fluctuations, density-density correlators, densities, and entanglement. We build upon the theory of out of equilibrium quantum systems, in conjunction with tensor network and exact simulations, showing the effectiveness of the tools for realistic models.
  • We develop a hybrid semiclassical method to study the time evolution of one dimensional quantum systems in and out of equilibrium. Our method handles internal degrees of freedom completely quantum mechanically by a modified time evolving block decimation method, while treating orbital quasiparticle motion classically. We can follow dynamics up to timescales well beyond the reach of standard numerical methods to observe the crossover between pre-equilibrated and locally phase equilibrated states. As an application, we investigate the quench dynamics and phase fluctuations of a pair of tunnel coupled one dimensional Bose condensates. We demonstrate the emergence of soliton-collision induced phase propagation, soliton-entropy production and multistep thermalization. Our method can be applied to a wide range of gapped one-dimensional systems.
  • In contrast to lattice systems where powerful numerical techniques such as matrix product state based methods are available to study the non-equilibrium dynamics, the non-equilibrium behaviour of continuum systems is much harder to simulate. We demonstrate here that Hamiltonian truncation methods can be efficiently applied to this problem, by studying the quantum quench dynamics of the 1+1 dimensional Ising field theory using a truncated free fermionic space approach. After benchmarking the method with integrable quenches corresponding to changing the mass in a free Majorana fermion field theory, we study the effect of an integrability breaking perturbation by the longitudinal magnetic field. In both the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic phases of the model we find persistent oscillations with frequencies set by the low-lying particle excitations not only for small, but even for moderate size quenches. In the ferromagnetic phase these particles are the various non-perturbative confined bound states of the domain wall excitations, while in the paramagnetic phase the single magnon excitation governs the dynamics, allowing us to capture the time evolution of the magnetisation using a combination of known results from perturbation theory and form factor based methods. We point out that the dominance of low lying excitations allows for the numerical or experimental determination of the mass spectra through the study of the quench dynamics.
  • We present a model for an autonomous quantum thermal machine comprised of two qubits capable of manipulating and even amplifying the local coherence in a non-degenerate external system. The machine uses only thermal resources, namely, contact with two heat baths at different temperatures, and the external system has a non-zero initial amount of coherence. The method we propose allows for an interconversion between energy, both work and heat, and coherence in an autonomous configuration working in out-of-equilibrium conditions. This model raises interesting questions about the role of fundamental limitations on transformations involving coherence and opens up new possibilities in the manipulation of coherence by autonomous thermal machines.
  • Fixed points for scalar theories in $4-\varepsilon$, $6-\varepsilon$ and $3-\varepsilon$ dimensions are discussed. It is shown how a large range of known fixed points for the four dimensional case can be obtained by using a general framework with two couplings. The original maximal symmetry, $O(N)$, is broken to various subgroups, both discrete and continuous. A similar discussion is applied to the six dimensional case. Perturbative applications of the $a$-theorem are used to help classify potential fixed points. At lowest order in the $\varepsilon$-expansion it is shown that at fixed points there is a lower bound for $a$ which is saturated at bifurcation points.
  • Rigorous nonequilibrium actions for the many-body problem are usually derived by means of path integrals combined with a discrete temporal mesh on the Schwinger-Keldysh time contour. The latter suffers from a fundamental limitation: the initial state on this contour cannot be arbitrary, but necessarily needs to be described by a non-interacting density matrix, while interactions are switched on adiabatically. The Kostantinov-Perel' contour overcomes these and other limitations, allowing generic initial-state preparations. In this Article, we apply the technique of the discrete temporal mesh to rigorously build the nonequilibrium path integral on the Kostantinov-Perel' time contour.
  • Fourier's law governing the heat conduction has been considered to be broken in low(one or two)-dimensional momentum-conserving systems, based on the theory of the semi-macroscopic fluidic continuum. It is predicted that the heat conductivity in those systems should diverge in the thermodynamic long-wavelength limit. However, recent molecular-dynamic studies have reported a considerable number of counterexamples where the intensive property of the heat conductivity and thus Fourier's law recover in low-dimensional momentum-conserving systems. To answer the conundrum lying between the semi-macroscopic theory and the microscopic numerics, in this paper, I refine the previous semi-macroscopic fluid analysis by introducing the elastic response. Based on the fluctuating elastodynamic equation, the mode-coupling and dynamic renormalization-group analyses show that the non-zero acoustic wave speeds result in the recovery of Fourier's law by destabilizing a previously known fixed point keeping the hyper-scaling between the heat conductivity and kinetic viscosity. The theory based on the dynamic renormalization-group further predicts the size scale of beginning the recovery of Fourier's law. The prediction is supported by the numerical experiments of Fermi-Pasta-Ulam(FPU)-$\beta$ lattices, the data of which are collapsed to the predicted scaling function for the recovery of Fourier's law without any fitting parameters. The provided theory and numerics suggest the universality of the recovery of Fourier's law in the low-dimensional solids, which eventually include the one-dimensional fluids sharing the same governing equations with one-dimensional solids.
  • Subadditivity is an important tool for proving the existence of thermodynamic limits in the statistical mechanics of models of lattice clusters (such as the self-avoiding walk and percolation clusters). The partition functions of these models may satisfy a variety of super- or submultiplicative inequalities, and these may be reduced to a subadditive relation by taking logarithms, and changing signs, if necessary. In this manuscript, the function $p_n^\#(m)$ into $\mathbb N$, with $(n,m)\in {\mathbb N}^2$, is assumed to satisfy the supermultiplicative inequality $ p_{n_1} ^\# (m_1) p_{n_2} ^\# (m_2) \leq p_{n_1+n_2} ^\# (m_1+ m_2)$. Inequalities of these types are frequently encountered in models of interacting lattice clusters; see for example reference [10]. Several results on $p_n^\#(m)$ in reference [9] are reviewed here, and in particular, a proof is given that the limit $ \log {\cal P}(\epsilon) = \lim_{n\to\infty} \frac{1}{n} \log p_n^\#(\lfloor \epsilon n \rfloor)$ exists and is a concave function of $\epsilon$ under very mild assumptions. In addition, it is shown that for a convergent sequence $\langle \delta_n \rangle$ in $\mathbb N$, such that $\lim_{n\to\infty} \frac{1}{n} \delta_n = \delta$, the limit $ \lim_{n\to\infty} \frac{1}{n} \log p_n^\#(\delta_n) = \log {\cal P}_\# (\delta) $ exists. This corrects an unrecoverable flaw in the proof of theorem 3.6 in reference [9].
  • The Born-Markov approximation is widely used to study dynamics of open quantum systems coupled to external baths. Using Keldysh formalism, we show that the dynamics of a system of bosons (fermions) linearly coupled to non-interacting bosonic (fermionic) bath falls outside this paradigm if the bath spectral function has non-analyticities as a function of frequency. In this case, we show that the dissipative and noise kernels governing the dynamics have distinct power law tails. The Green's functions show a short time "quasi" Markovian exponential decay before crossing over to a power law tail governed by the non-analyticity of the spectral function. We study a system of bosons (fermions) hopping on a one dimensional lattice, where each site is coupled linearly to an independent bath of non-interacting bosons (fermions). We obtain exact expressions for the Green's functions of this system which show power law decay $\sim |t-t'|^{-3/2}$. We use these to calculate density and current profile, as well as unequal time current-current correlators. While the density and current profiles show interesting quantitative deviations from Markovian results, the current-current correlators show qualitatively distinct long time power law tails $|t-t'|^{-3}$ characteristic of non-Markovian dynamics. We show that the power law decays survive in presence of inter-particle interaction in the system, but the cross-over time scale is shifted to larger values with increasing interaction strength.
  • We study the long-time behavior of conservative interacting particle systems in $Z$: the activated random walk model for reaction-diffusion systems and the stochastic sandpile. We prove that both systems undergo an absorbing-state phase transition.
  • Identifying the physical basis of heterosis (or hybrid vigor) has remained elusive despite over a hundred years of research on the subject. The three main theories of heterosis are dominance theory, overdominance theory, and epistasis theory. Kacser and Burns (1981) identified the molecular basis of dominance, which has greatly enhanced our understanding of its importance to heterosis. This paper aims to explain how overdominance, and some features of epistasis, can similarly emerge from the molecular dynamics of proteins. Possessing multiple alleles at a gene locus results in the synthesis of different allozymes at reduced concentrations. This in turn reduces the rate at which each allozyme forms soluble oligomers, which are toxic and must be degraded, because allozymes co-aggregate at low efficiencies. The model developed in this paper will be used to explain how heterozygosity can impact the metabolic efficiency of an organism. It can also explain why the viabilities of some inbred lines seem to decline rapidly at high inbreeding coefficients (F > 0.5), which may provide a physical basis for truncation selection for heterozygosity. Finally, the model has implications for the ploidy level of organisms. It can explain why polyploids are frequently found in environments where severe physical stresses promote the formation of soluble oligomers. The model can also explain why complex organisms, which need to synthesize aggregation-prone proteins that contain intrinsically unstructured regions (IURs) and multiple domains because they facilitate complex protein interaction networks (PINs), tend to be diploid while haploidy tends to be restricted to relatively simple organisms.
  • We investigate the asymptotic state of a periodically driven many-body quantum system which is weakly coupled to an environment. The combined action of the modulations and the environment steers the system towards a state being characterized by a time-periodic density operator. To resolve this asymptotic non-equilibrium state at stroboscopic instants of time, we introduce the dissipative Floquet map, evaluate the stroboscopic density operator as its eigen-element and elucidate how particle interactions affect properties of the density operator. We illustrate the idea with a periodically modulated Bose-Hubbard dimer and discuss the relations between the interaction-induced bifurcations in a mean-field dynamics and changes in the characteristics of the genuine quantum many-body state. We argue that Floquet maps provide insight into the system relaxation towards its asymptotic state and may help to understand whether it is possible (or not) to construct a stroboscopic time-independent generator mimicking the action of the original time-dependent one.
  • We consider a system composed of a fixed number of particles and having total energy smaller or equal to some prescribed value. The particles are non-interacting, distributed on a fixed number of energy levels. The energy levels are degenerate and degeneracy is a function of the number of particles. Three cases of the degeneration function is considered. It can increase with either the same rate as the number of particles or slower, or faster. We provide explicit points of maximum of entropy for all the cases. Depending on the total energy, the maximum can be in the interior of the system state space or on the boundary. On the boundary it can have further three cases depending on the degeneration function. The main result, Law of Large Numbers yields the most probable system states, which can become either Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics or Bose-Einstein statistics, or Zipf-Mandelbort law. We also find the limiting laws for the fluctuations. These laws are different for various cases of the maximum point of the entropy. They can be mixture of a Normal, Exponential and Discrete distributions. Explicit rate of convergence is provided for all the theorems.
  • We present a new state function, denotes the energy of thermal motion, it shows that the energy classification for the internal energy has been completed. In a new theoretical structure, we present the concept of the heat partial pressure, rewrite the equations of the first law, by which, the energy conversion and energy transport can be distinguished by an explicit way, we redefine the concept of the entropy, and confirm a conversion potential related to the dissipative compensation, we discuss in detail on the three sources of irreversibility, and the conversions between the calorimetric entropy and the configurational entropy, an interesting conclusion shows that the second law itself has contained the mechanism of evolution.
  • Internal diffusion-limited aggregation (IDLA) is a stochastic growth model on a graph $G$ which describes the formation of a random set of vertices growing from the origin (some fixed vertex) of $G$. Particles start at the origin and perform simple random walks; each particle moves until it lands on a site which was not previously visited by other particles. This random set of occupied sites in $G$ is called the IDLA cluster. In this paper we consider IDLA on Sierpinski gasket graphs, and show that the IDLA cluster fills balls (in the graph metric) with probability 1.
  • For conformal field theories, it is shown how the Ward identity corresponding to dilatation invariance arises in a Wilsonian setting. In so doing, several points which are opaque in textbook treatments are clarified. Exploiting the fact that the Exact Renormalization Group furnishes a representation of the conformal algebra allows dilatation invariance to be stated directly as a property of the action, despite the presence of a regulator. This obviates the need for formal statements that conformal invariance is recovered once the regulator is removed. Furthermore, the proper subset of conformal primary fields for which the Ward identity holds is identified for all dimensionalities.
  • For non-equilibrium systems in a steady state we present two necessary and sufficient conditions for the emergence of $q$-canonical ensembles, also known as Tsallis statistics. These conditions are invariance requirements over the definition of subsystem and environment, and over the joint rescaling of temperature and energy. Our approach is independent of, but complementary to, the notions of Tsallis non-extensive statistics and Superstatistics.
  • A Legendre transform of the recently discovered conformal fixed-point equation is constructed, providing an unintegrated equation encoding full conformal invariance within the framework of the effective average action.
  • We study the slowing down of particle beams passing through the dusty plasma with power-law kappa-distributions. Three plasma components, electrons, ions and dust particles, can have different kappa-parameter. We derive the deceleration factor (the velocity moment equation) and the slowing down time of a test particle, and numerically study the slowing down properties of an electron beam, a proton beam and a dust particle beam, respectively, in the kappa-distributed dusty plasma. We show that the slowing down properties of particle beams depend strongly on the kappa-parameters of the plasma components, and the dust component plays a dominant role in the slowing down. And the slowing down also depends on mass and charge of the dust particles in the dusty plasma. More detailed results are shown in 17 numerical graphs.
  • We investigate the size scaling of the entanglement entropy (EE) in nonequilibrium steady states (NESSs) of a one-dimensional open quantum system with a random potential. It models a mesoscopic conductor, composed of a long quantum wire (QWR) with impurities and two electron reservoirs at zero temperature. The EE at equilibrium obeys the logarithmic law. However, in NESSs far from equilibrium the EE grows anomalously fast, obeying the `quasi volume law,' although the conductor is driven by the zero-temperature reservoirs. This anomalous behavior arises from both the far from equilibrium condition and multiple scatterings due to impurities.
  • The results of the renormalization group are commonly advertised as the existence of power law singularities near critical points. The classic predictions are often violated and logarithmic and exponential corrections are treated on a case-by-case basis. We use the mathematics of normal form theory to systematically group these into universality families of seemingly unrelated systems united by common scaling variables. We recover and explain the existing literature and predict the nonlinear generalization for the universal homogeneous scaling functions. We show that this procedure leads to a better handling of the singularity even in classic cases and elaborate our framework using several examples.
  • The statistics of the smallest eigenvalue of Wishart-Laguerre ensemble is important from several perspectives. The smallest eigenvalue density is typically expressible in terms of determinants or Pfaffians. These results are of utmost significance in understanding the spectral behavior of Wishart-Laguerre ensembles and, among other things, unveil the underlying universality aspects in the asymptotic limits. However, obtaining exact and explicit expressions by expanding determinants or Pfaffians becomes impractical if large dimension matrices are involved. For the real matrices ($\beta=1$) Edelman has provided an efficient recurrence scheme to work out exact and explicit results for the smallest eigenvalue density which does not involve determinants or matrices. Very recently, an analogous recurrence scheme has been obtained for the complex matrices ($\beta=2$). In the present work we extend this to $\beta$-Wishart-Laguerre ensembles for the case when exponent $\alpha$ in the associated Laguerre weight function, $\lambda^\alpha e^{-\beta\lambda/2}$, is a non-negative integer, while $\beta$ is positive real. This also gives access to the smallest eigenvalue density of fixed trace $\beta$-Wishart-Laguerre ensemble, as well as moments for both cases. Moreover, comparison with earlier results for the smallest eigenvalue density in terms of certain hypergeometric function of matrix argument results in an effective way of evaluating these explicitly. Exact evaluations for large values of $n$ (the matrix dimension) and $\alpha$ also enable us to compare with Tracy-Widom density and large deviation results of Katzav and Castillo. We also use our result to obtain the density of the largest of the proper delay times which are eigenvalues of the Wigner-Smith matrix and are relevant to the problem of quantum chaotic scattering.
  • Introduced in the late 1960's, the asymmetric exclusion process (ASEP) is an important model from statistical mechanics which describes a system of interacting particles hopping left and right on a one-dimensional lattice with open boundaries. It has been known for awhile that there is a tight connection between the partition function of the ASEP and moments of Askey-Wilson polynomials, a family of orthogonal polynomials which are at the top of the hierarchy of classical orthogonal polynomials in one variable. On the other hand, Askey-Wilson polynomials can be viewed as a specialization of the multivariate Macdonald-Koornwinder polynomials (also known as Koornwinder polynomials), which in turn give rise to the Macdonald polynomials associated to any classical root system via a limit or specialization. In light of the fact that Koornwinder polynomials generalize the Askey-Wilson polynomials, it is natural to ask whether one can find a particle model whose partition function is related to Koornwinder polynomials. In this article we answer this question affirmatively, by showing that the "homogeneous" Koornwinder moments at q=t recover the partition function for the two-species exclusion process. We also provide a "hook length" formula for Koornwinder moments when q=t=1.
  • The relationship between anomalous superdiffusive behavior and particle trapping probability is analyzed on a rocking ratchet potential with spatially correlated weak disorder. The trapping probability density is shown, analytically and numerically, to have an exponential form as a function of space. The trapping processes with a low or no thermal noise are only transient, but they can last much longer than the characteristic time scale of the system and therefore might be detected experimentally. Using the result for the trapping probability we obtain an analytical expression for the number of wells where a given number of particles are trapped. We have also obtained an analytical approximation for the second-moment of the particle distribution function C2 as a function of time, when trapped particles coexist with constant velocity untrapped particles. We also use the expression for C2 to characterize the anomalous superdiffusive motion in the absence of thermal noise for the transient time.
  • This work constructs a well-defined and operational form factor expansion in a model having a massless spectrum of excitations. More precisely, the dynamic two-point functions in the massless regime of the XXZ spin-1/2 chain are expressed in terms of properly regularised series of multiple integrals. These series are obtained by taking, in an appropriate way, the thermodynamic limit of the finite volume form factor expansions. The series are structured in way allowing one to identify directly the contributions to the correlator stemming from the conformal-type excitations on the Fermi surface and those issuing from the massive excitations (deep holes, particles and bound states). The obtained form factor series opens up the possibility of a systematic and exact study of asymptotic regimes of dynamical correlation functions in the massless regime of the XXZ spin $1/2$ chain. Furthermore, the assumptions on the microscopic structure of the model's Hilbert space that are necessary so as to write down the series appear to be compatible with any model -- not necessarily integrable -- belonging to the Luttinger liquid universality class. Thus, the present analysis provides also the phenomenological structure of form factor expansions in massless models belonging to this universality class.