• The neural network is a powerful computing framework that has been exploited by biological evolution and by humans for solving diverse problems. Although the computational capabilities of neural networks are determined by their structure, the current understanding of the relationships between a neural network's architecture and function is still primitive. Here we reveal that neural network's modular architecture plays a vital role in determining the neural dynamics and memory performance of the network of threshold neurons. In particular, we demonstrate that there exists an optimal modularity for memory performance, where a balance between local cohesion and global connectivity is established, allowing optimally modular networks to remember longer. Our results suggest that insights from dynamical analysis of neural networks and information spreading processes can be leveraged to better design neural networks and may shed light on the brain's modular organization.
  • Most of our current understanding of mechanisms of photosynthesis comes from spectroscopy. However, classical definition of radio-antenna can be extended to optical regime to discuss the function of light-harvesting antennae. Further to our previously proposed model of a loop antenna we provide several more physical explanations on considering the non-reciprocal properties of the light harvesters of bacteria. We explained the function of the non-heme iron at the reaction center, and presented reasons for each module of the light harvester being composed of one carotenoid, two short $\alpha$-helical polypeptides and three bacteriochlorophylls; we explained also the toroidal shape of the light harvester, the upper bound of the characteristic length of the light harvester, the functional role played by the long-lasting spectrometric signal observed, and the photon anti-bunching observed. Based on these analyses, two mechanisms might be used by radiation-durable bacteria, {\it Deinococcus radiodurans}; and the non-reciprocity of an archaeon, {\it Haloquadratum walsbyi}, are analyzed. The physical lessons involved are useful for designing artificial light harvesters, optical sensors, wireless power chargers, passive super-Planckian heat radiators, photocatalytic hydrogen generators, and radiation protective cloaks. In particular it can predict what kind of particles should be used to separate sunlight into a photovoltaically and thermally useful range to enhance the efficiency of solar cells.
  • Biophysical modelling of diffusion MRI is necessary to provide specific microstructural tissue properties. However, estimating model parameters from data with limited diffusion gradient strength, such as clinical scanners, has proven unreliable due to a shallow optimization landscape. On the other hand, estimation of diffusion kurtosis (DKI) parameters is more robust as the clinical acquisitions typically probe a regime in which the associated 4th order cumulant expansion is adequate; however, its parameters are not microstructurally specific a priori. Given an appropriate biophysical model, its parameters may be connected to DKI parameters, but it was previously shown that at the DKI level, it still does not provide sufficient information to uniquely determine all model parameters. Earlier work has shown that by neglecting axonal dispersion, this parameter degeneracy reduces to the question of whether intra-axonal diffusivity is larger than or smaller than extra-axonal diffusivity. Here we develop a model of diffusion in spinal cord white matter including axonal dispersion and demonstrate stable estimation of all model parameters from DKI. By employing the recently developed fast axisymmetric DKI, we use stimulated echo acquisition mode to collect data over an unprecedented diffusion time range with very narrow diffusion gradient pulses, enabling finely resolved measurements of diffusion time dependence of both net diffusion and kurtosis metrics, as well as model intra- and extra-axonal diffusivities, and axonal dispersion. Our results demonstrate substantial time dependence of all parameters except volume fractions, and the additional time dimension provides support for intra-axonal diffusivity to be larger than extra-axonal diffusivity in spinal cord white matter, although not unambiguously. We compare our findings to predictions from effective medium theory.
  • Identifying the physical basis of heterosis (or hybrid vigor) has remained elusive despite over a hundred years of research on the subject. The three main theories of heterosis are dominance theory, overdominance theory, and epistasis theory. Kacser and Burns (1981) identified the molecular basis of dominance, which has greatly enhanced our understanding of its importance to heterosis. This paper aims to explain how overdominance, and some features of epistasis, can similarly emerge from the molecular dynamics of proteins. Possessing multiple alleles at a gene locus results in the synthesis of different allozymes at reduced concentrations. This in turn reduces the rate at which each allozyme forms soluble oligomers, which are toxic and must be degraded, because allozymes co-aggregate at low efficiencies. The model developed in this paper will be used to explain how heterozygosity can impact the metabolic efficiency of an organism. It can also explain why the viabilities of some inbred lines seem to decline rapidly at high inbreeding coefficients (F > 0.5), which may provide a physical basis for truncation selection for heterozygosity. Finally, the model has implications for the ploidy level of organisms. It can explain why polyploids are frequently found in environments where severe physical stresses promote the formation of soluble oligomers. The model can also explain why complex organisms, which need to synthesize aggregation-prone proteins that contain intrinsically unstructured regions (IURs) and multiple domains because they facilitate complex protein interaction networks (PINs), tend to be diploid while haploidy tends to be restricted to relatively simple organisms.
  • A classic problem in microbiology is that bacteria display two types of growth behavior when cultured on a mixture of two carbon sources: the two sources are sequentially consumed one after another (diauxie) or they are simultaneously consumed (co-utilization). The search for the molecular mechanism of diauxie led to the discovery of the lac operon. However, questions remain as why microbes would bother to have different strategies of taking up nutrients. Here we show that diauxie versus co-utilization can be understood from the topological features of the metabolic network. A model of optimal allocation of protein resources quantitatively explains why and how the cell makes the choice. In case of co-utilization, the model predicts the percentage of each carbon source in supplying the amino acid pools, which is quantitatively verified by experiments. Our work solves a long-standing puzzle and provides a quantitative framework for the carbon source utilization of microbes.
  • Active particles disturb the fluid around them as force dipoles, or stresslets, which govern their collective dynamics. Unlike swimming speeds, the stresslets of active particles are rarely determined due to the lack of a suitable theoretical framework for arbitrary geometry. We propose a general method, based on the reciprocal theorem of Stokes flows, to compute stresslets as integrals of the velocities on the particle's surface, which we illustrate for spheroidal chemically-active particles. Our method will allow tuning the stresslet of artificial swimmers and tailoring their collective motion in complex environments.
  • We map a class of well-mixed stochastic models of biochemical feedback in steady state to the mean-field Ising model near the critical point. The mapping provides an effective temperature, magnetic field, order parameter, and heat capacity that can be extracted from biological data without fitting or knowledge of the underlying molecular details. We demonstrate this procedure on fluorescence data from mouse T cells, which reveals distinctions between how the cells respond to different drugs. We also show that the heat capacity allows inference of absolute molecule number from fluorescence intensity. We explain this result in terms of the underlying fluctuations and demonstrate the generality of our work.
  • The metabolic processes complexity is at the heart of energy conversion in living organisms and forms a huge obstacle to develop tractable thermodynamic metabolism models. By raising our analysis to a higher level of abstraction, we develop a compact -- i.e. relying on a reduced set of parameters -- thermodynamic model of metabolism, in order to analyze the chemical-to-mechanical energy conversion under muscle load, and give a thermodynamic ground to Hill's seminal muscular operational response model. Living organisms are viewed as dynamical systems experiencing a feedback loop in the sense that they can be considered as thermodynamic systems subjected to mixed boundary conditions, coupling both potentials and fluxes. Starting from a rigorous derivation of generalized thermoelastic and transport coefficients, leading to the definition of a metabolic figure of merit, we establish the expression of the chemical-mechanical coupling, and specify the nature of the dissipative mechanism and the so called figure of merit. The particular nature of the boundary conditions of such a system reveals the presence of a feedback resistance, representing an active parameter, which is crucial for the proper interpretation of the muscle response under effort in the framework of Hill's model. We also develop an exergy analysis of the so-called maximum power principle, here understood as a particular configuration of an out-of-equilibrium system, with no supplemental extremal principle involved.
  • Meaningful laws of nature must be independent of the units employed to measure the variables. The principle of similitude (Rayleigh 1915) or dimensional homogeneity, states that only commensurable quantities (ones having the same dimension) may be compared, therefore, meaningful laws of nature must be homogeneous equations in their various units of measurement, a result which was formalized in the $\rm \Pi$ theorem (Vaschy 1892; Buckingham 1914). However, most relations in allometry do not satisfy this basic requirement, including the `3/4 Law' (Kleiber 1932) that relates the basal metabolic rate and body mass, which it is sometimes claimed to be the most fundamental biological rate (Brown et al. 2004) and the closest to a law in life sciences (West \& Brown 2004). Using the $\rm \Pi$ theorem, here we show that it is possible to construct a unique homogeneous equation for the metabolic rates, in agreement with data in the literature. We find that the variations in the dependence of the metabolic rates on body mass are secondary, coming from variations in the allometric dependence of the heart frequencies. This includes not only different classes of animals (mammals, birds, invertebrates) but also different exercise conditions (basal and maximal). Our results demonstrate that most of the differences found in the allometric exponents (White et al. 2007) are due to compare incommensurable quantities and that our dimensionally homogenous formula, unify these differences into a single formulation. We discuss the ecological implications of this new formulation in the context of the Malthusian's, Fenchel's and the total energy consumed in a lifespan relations.
  • Changes in brain states, as found in many neurological diseases such as epilepsy, are often described as bifurcations in mesoscopic neural models. Nearly all of these models rely on a mathematically convenient, but biophysically inaccurate, description of the synaptic input to neurons called current-based synapses. We develop a novel analytical framework to analyze the effects of a more biophysically realistic description, known as conductance-based synapses. These are implemented in a mesoscopic neural model and compared to the standard approximation via a single parameter homotopic mapping. A bifurcation analysis using the homotopy parameter demonstrates that if a more realistic synaptic coupling mechanism is used in this class of models, then a bifurcation or transition to an abnormal brain state does not occur in the same parameter space. We show that the more realistic coupling has additional mathematical parameters that require a fundamentally different biophysical mechanism to undergo a state transition. These results demonstrate the importance of incorporating more realistic synapses in mesoscopic neural models and challenge the accuracy of previous models, especially those describing brain state transitions such as epilepsy.
  • Cell division and death can be regulated by the mechanical forces within a tissue. We study the consequences for the stability and roughness of a propagating interface, by analysing a model of mechanically-regulated tissue growth in the regime of small driving forces. For an interface driven by homeostatic pressure imbalance or leader-cell motility, long and intermediate-wavelength instabilities arise, depending respectively on an effective viscosity of cell number change, and on substrate friction. A further mechanism depends on the strength of directed motility forces acting in the bulk. We analyse the fluctuations of a stable interface subjected to cell-level stochasticity, and find that mechanical feedback can help preserve reproducibility at the tissue scale. Our results elucidate mechanisms that could be important for orderly interface motion in developing tissues.
  • We construct a complexity-based morphospace to study systems-level properties of conscious & intelligent systems. The axes of this space label 3 complexity types: autonomous, cognitive & social. Given recent proposals to synthesize consciousness, a generic complexity-based conceptualization provides a useful framework for identifying defining features of conscious & synthetic systems. Based on current clinical scales of consciousness that measure cognitive awareness and wakefulness, we take a perspective on how contemporary artificially intelligent machines & synthetically engineered life forms measure on these scales. It turns out that awareness & wakefulness can be associated to computational & autonomous complexity respectively. Subsequently, building on insights from cognitive robotics, we examine the function that consciousness serves, & argue the role of consciousness as an evolutionary game-theoretic strategy. This makes the case for a third type of complexity for describing consciousness: social complexity. Having identified these complexity types, allows for a representation of both, biological & synthetic systems in a common morphospace. A consequence of this classification is a taxonomy of possible conscious machines. We identify four types of consciousness, based on embodiment: (i) biological consciousness, (ii) synthetic consciousness, (iii) group consciousness (resulting from group interactions), & (iv) simulated consciousness (embodied by virtual agents within a simulated reality). This taxonomy helps in the investigation of comparative signatures of consciousness across domains, in order to highlight design principles necessary to engineer conscious machines. This is particularly relevant in the light of recent developments at the crossroads of cognitive neuroscience, biomedical engineering, artificial intelligence & biomimetics.
  • A self-replicator is usually understood to be an object of definite form that promotes the conversion of materials in its environment into a nearly identical copy of itself. The challenge of engineering novel, micro- or nano-scale self-replicators has attracted keen interest in recent years, both because exponential amplification is an attractive method for generating high yields of specific products, and also because self-reproducing entities have the potential to be optimized or adapted through rounds of iterative selection. Substantial steps forward have been achieved both in the engineering of particular self-replicating molecules, and also in characterizing the physical basis for possible mechanisms of self-replication. At present, however, there is need for a theoretical treatment of what physical conditions are most conducive to the emergence of novel self-replicating structures from a reservoir of building blocks on a desired time-scale. Here we report progress in addressing this need. By analyzing the dynamics of a generic class of heterogeneous particle mixtures whose reaction rates emerge from basic physical interactions, we demonstrate that the spontaneous discovery of self-replication is controlled by relatively generic features of the chemical space, namely: the dispersion in the distribution of reaction timescales and bound-state energies. Based on this analysis, we provide quantitative criteria that may aid experimentalists in designing a system capable of producing self-replicators, and in estimating the likely timescale for exponential growth to start.
  • Microcolonies are aggregates of a few dozen to a few thousand cells exhibited by many bacteria. The formation of microcolonies is a crucial step towards the formation of more mature bacterial communities known as biofilms, but also marks a significant change in bacterial physiology. Within a microcolony, bacteria forgo a single cell lifestyle for a communal lifestyle hallmarked by high cell density and physical interactions between cells potentially altering their behaviour. It is thus crucial to understand how initially identical single cells start to behave differently while assembling in these tight communities. Here we show that cells in the microcolonies formed by the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Ng) present differential motility behaviors within an hour upon colony formation. Observation of merging microcolonies and tracking of single cells within microcolonies reveal a heterogeneous motility behavior: cells close to the surface of the microcolony exhibit a much higher motility compared to cells towards the center. Numerical simulations of a biophysical model for the microcolonies at the single cell level suggest that the emergence of differential behavior within a multicellular microcolony of otherwise identical cells is of mechanical origin. It could suggest a route toward further bacterial differentiation and ultimately mature biofilms.
  • Ultrasound is increasingly being used to modulate the properties of biological membranes for applications in drug delivery and neuromodulation. While various studies have investigated the mechanical aspect of the interaction such as acoustic absorption and membrane deformation, it is not clear how these effects transduce into biological functions, for example, changes in the permeability or the enzymatic activity of the membrane. A critical aspect of the activity of an enzyme is the thermal fluctuations of its solvation or hydration shell. Thermal fluctuations are also known to be directly related to membrane permeability. Here solvation shell changes of lipid membranes subject to an acoustic impulse were investigated using a fluorescence probe, Laurdan. Laurdan was embedded in multi-lamellar lipid vesicles in water, which were exposed to broadband pressure impulses of the order of 1MPa peak amplitude and 10{\mu}s pulse duration. An instrument was developed to monitor changes in the emission spectrum of the dye at two wavelengths with sub-microsecond temporal resolution. The experiments show that changes in the emission spectrum, and hence the fluctuations of the solvation shell, are related to the changes in the thermodynamic state of the membrane and correlated with the compression and rarefaction of the incident sound wave. The results suggest that acoustic fields affect the state of a lipid membrane and therefore can potentially modulate the kinetics of channels and proteins embedded in the membrane.
  • We investigate the geometrical and mechanical properties of adherent cells characterized by a highly anisotropic actin cytoskeleton. Using a combination of theoretical work and experiments on micropillar arrays, we demonstrate that the shape of the cell edge is accurately described by elliptical arcs, whose eccentricity expresses the degree of anisotropy of the internal cell stresses. This results in a spatially varying tension along the cell edge, that significantly affects the traction forces exerted by the cell on the substrate. Our work highlights the strong interplay between cell mechanics and geometry and paves the way towards the reconstruction of cellular forces from geometrical data.
  • The distributions of the times to the first common ancestor t_mrca is numerically studied for an ecological population model, the extended Moran model. This model has a fixed population size N. The number of descendants is drawn from a beta distribution Beta(alpha, 2-alpha) for various choices of alpha. This includes also the classical Moran model (alpha->0) as well as the uniform distribution (alpha=1). Using a statistical mechanics-based large-deviation approach, the distributions can be studied over an extended range of the support, down to probabilities like 10^{-70}, which allowed us to study the change of the tails of the distribution when varying the value of alpha in [0,2]. We find exponential distributions p(t_mrca)~ delta^{t_mrca} in all cases, with systematically varying values for the base delta. Only for the cases alpha=0 and alpha=1, analytical results are known, i.e., delta=\exp(-2/N^2) and delta=2/3, respectively. We recover these values, confirming the validity of our approach. Finally, we also study the correlations between t_mrca and the number of descendants.
  • We establish a general linear response relation for spiking neuronal networks, based on chains with unbounded memory. This relation allows quantifying the influence of a weak amplitude external stimuli on spatio-temporal spike correlations, in a general context where the memory in spike dynamics can go arbitrarily far in the past. With this approach, we show how linear response is explicitly related to neuron dynamics with an example, the gIF model, introduced by M. Rudolph and A. Destexhe [91]. This illustrates the effect of the stimuli, intrinsic neuronal dynamics, and network connectivity on spike statistics.
  • Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shifts more and more into the focus of clinical research. Especially determination of relaxation times without/and with contrast agents becomes the foundation of tissue characterization, e.g. in cardiac MRI for myocardial fibrosis. Techniques which assess longitudinal relaxation times rely on repetitive application of readout modules, which are interrupted by free relaxation periods, e.g. the Modified Look-Locker Inversion Recovery = MOLLI sequence. These discontinuous sequences reveal an apparent relaxation time, and, by techniques extrapolated from continuous readout sequences, the real T1 is determined. What is missing is a rigorous analysis of the dependence of the apparent relaxation time on its real partner, readout sequence parameters and biological parameters as heart rate. This is provided in this paper for the discontinuous balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP) and spoiled gradient echo readouts. It turns out that the apparente longitudinal relaxation rate is the time average of the relaxation rates during the readout module, and free relaxation period. Knowing the heart rate our results vice versa allow to determine the real T1 from its measured apparent partner.
  • Nonlinear structured illumination microscopy (nSIM) is an effective approach for super-resolution wide-field fluorescence microscopy with a theoretically unlimited resolution. In nSIM, carefully designed, highly-contrasted illumination patterns are combined with the saturation of an optical transition to enable sub-diffraction imaging. While the technique proved useful for two-dimensional imaging, extending it to three-dimensions (3D) is challenging due to the fading/fatigue of organic fluorophores under intense cycling conditions. Here, we present a compressed sensing approach that allows for the first time 3D sub-diffraction nSIM of cultured cells by saturating fluorescence excitation. Exploiting the natural orthogonality of transverse speckle illumination planes, 3D probing of the sample is achieved by a single two-dimensional scan. Fluorescence contrast under saturated excitation is ensured by the inherent high density of intensity minima associated with optical vortices in polarized speckle patterns. Compressed speckle microscopy is thus a simple approach that enables 3D super-resolved nSIM imaging with potentially considerably reduced acquisition time and photobleaching.les fast 3D super-resolved imaging with considerably minimized photo-bleaching.
  • Gene regulatory network (GRN)-based morphogenetic models have recently gained an increasing attention. However, the relationship between microscopic properties of intracellular GRNs and macroscopic properties of morphogenetic systems has not been fully understood yet. Here we propose a theoretical morphogenetic model representing an aggregation of cells, and reveal the relationship between criticality of GRNs and morphogenetic pattern formation. In our model, the positions of the cells are determined by spring-mass-damper kinetics. Each cell has an identical Kauffman's $NK$ random Boolean network (RBN) as its GRN. We varied the properties of GRNs from ordered, through critical, to chaotic by adjusting node in-degree $K$. We randomly assigned four cell fates to the attractors of RBNs for cellular behaviors. By comparing diverse morphologies generated in our morphogenetic systems, we investigated what the role of the criticality of GRNs is in forming morphologies. We found that nontrivial spatial patterns were generated most frequently when GRNs were at criticality. Our finding indicates that the criticality of GRNs facilitates the formation of nontrivial morphologies in GRN-based morphogenetic systems.
  • Crosslinked semi-flexible and flexible filaments that are actively deformed by molecular motors occur in various natural settings, such as the ordered eukaryotic flagellum, and the disordered cytoskeleton. The deformation of these composite systems is driven by active motor forces and resisted by passive filament elasticity, and structural constraints due to permanent cross-links. Using a mean field theory for a one-dimensional ordered system, we show that the combination of motor activity and finite filament extensibility yields a characteristic persistence length scale over which active strain decays. This decay length is set by the ability of motors to respond to combination of the weak extensional elasticity, passive shear resistance and the viscoelastic properties of the motor assembly, and generalizes the notion of persistence in purely thermal filaments to active systems.
  • In environments with scarce resources, adopting the right search strategy can make the difference between succeeding and failing, even between life and death. At different scales, this applies to molecular encounters in the cell cytoplasm, to animals looking for food or mates in natural landscapes, to rescuers during search-and-rescue operations in disaster zones, as well as to genetic computer algorithms exploring parameter spaces. When looking for sparse targets in a homogeneous environment, a combination of ballistic and diffusive steps is considered optimal; in particular, more ballistic L\'evy flights with exponent {\alpha} <= 1 are generally believed to optimize the search process. However, most search spaces present complex topographies, with boundaries, barriers and obstacles. What is the best search strategy in these more realistic scenarios? Here we show that the topography of the environment significantly alters the optimal search strategy towards less ballistic and more Brownian strategies. We consider an active particle performing a blind search in a two-dimensional space with steps drawn from a L\'evy distribution with exponent varying from {\alpha} = 1 to {\alpha} = 2 (Brownian). We demonstrate that the optimal search strategy depends on the topography of the environment, with {\alpha} assuming intermediate values in the whole range under consideration. We interpret these findings in terms of a simple theoretical model, and discuss their robustness to the addition of Brownian diffusion to the searcher's motion. Our results are relevant for search problems at different length scales, from animal and human foraging to microswimmers' taxis, to biochemical rates of reaction.
  • The formalism of partial information decomposition provides independent or non-overlapping components constituting total information content provided by a set of source variables about the target variable. These components are recognised as unique information, synergistic information and, redundant information. The metric of net synergy, conceived as the difference between synergistic and redundant information, is capable of detecting synergy, redundancy and, information independence among stochastic variables. And it can be quantified, as it is done here, using appropriate combinations of different Shannon mutual information terms. Utilisation of such a metric in network motifs with the nodes representing different biochemical species, involved in information sharing, uncovers rich store for interesting results. In the current study, we make use of this formalism to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the relative information processing mechanism in a diamond motif and two of its sub-motifs namely bifurcation and integration motif embedded within the diamond motif. The emerging patterns of synergy and redundancy and their effective contribution towards ensuring high fidelity information transmission are duly compared in the sub-motifs and independent motifs (bifurcation and integration). In this context, the crucial roles played by various time scales and activation coefficients in the network topologies are especially emphasised. We show that the origin of synergy and redundancy in information transmission can be physically justified by decomposing diamond motif into bifurcation and integration motif.
  • Bacterial colonies are abundant on living and nonliving surfaces and are known to mediate a broad range of processes in ecology, medicine, and industry. Although extensively researched, from single cells to demographic scales, a comprehensive biomechanical picture, highlighting the cell-to-colony dynamics, is still lacking. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and continuous modeling, we investigate the geometrical and mechanical properties of a bacterial colony growing on a substrate with a free boundary and demonstrate that such an expanding colony self-organizes into a "mosaic" of microdomains consisting of highly aligned cells. The emergence of microdomains is mediated by two competing forces: the steric forces between neighboring cells, which favor cell alignment, and the extensile stresses due to cell growth that tend to reduce the local orientational order and thereby distort the system. This interplay results in an exponential distribution of the domain areas and sets a characteristic length scale proportional to the square root of the ratio between the system orientational stiffness and the magnitude of the extensile active stress. Our theoretical predictions are finally compared with experiments with freely growing E. coli microcolonies, finding quantitative agreement.