• Online social media are information resources that can have a transformative power in society. While the Web was envisioned as an equalizing force that allows everyone to access information, the digital divide prevents large amounts of people from being present online. Online social media in particular are prone to gender inequality, an important issue given the link between social media use and employment. Understanding gender inequality in social media is a challenging task due to the necessity of data sources that can provide large-scale measurements across multiple countries. Here we show how the Facebook Gender Divide (FGD), a metric based on aggregated statistics of more than 1.4 Billion users in 217 countries, explains various aspects of worldwide gender inequality. Our analysis shows that the FGD encodes gender equality indices in education, health, and economic opportunity. We find gender differences in network externalities that suggest that using social media has an added value for women. Furthermore, we find that low values of the FGD are associated with increases in economic gender equality. Our results suggest that online social networks, while suffering evident gender imbalance, may lower the barriers that women have to access informational resources and help to narrow the economic gender gap.
  • Crowd employment is a new form of short-term and flexible employment which has emerged during the past decade. In order to understand this new form of employment, it is crucial to illuminate the underlying motivations of the workforce involved in it. This paper introduces the Multidimensional Crowdworker Motivation Scale (MCMS), a scale for measuring the motivation of crowdworkers on micro-task platforms. The MCMS is theoretically grounded in self-determination theory and tailored specifically to the context of paid crowdsourced micro-labor. The scale measures the motivation of crowdworkers along six motivational dimensions, ranging from amotivation to intrinsic motivation. We validated the MCMS on data collected in ten countries and three income groups. Factor analyses demonstrated that the MCMS's six dimensions showed good model fit, validity, and reliability. Furthermore, our measurement invariance tests showed that motivations measured with the MCMS are comparable across countries and income groups, and we present a first cross-country comparison of crowdworker motivations. This work constitutes an important first step towards understanding the motivations of the international crowd workforce.
  • The association between light and psychological states has a long history and permeates our language. LIVEIA (Light-based Immersive Visualization Environment for Imaginative Actualization) is a new immersive, interactive technology that uses physical light as a metaphor for visualizing peoples' inner lives and relationships. This paper outlines its educational value, as a tool for understanding and explaining aspects of how people think and interact, and its potential therapeutic value as a form of art therapy in which the artwork has straightforwardly interpretable symbolic meanings.
  • In many domain applications, a continuous timeline of human locations is critical; for example for understanding possible locations where a disease may spread, or the flow of traffic. While data sources such as GPS trackers or Call Data Records are temporally-rich, they are expensive, often not publicly available or garnered only in select locations, restricting their wide use. Conversely, geo-located social media data are publicly and freely available, but present challenges especially for full timeline inference due to their sparse nature. We propose a stochastic framework, Intermediate Location Computing (ILC) which uses prior knowledge about human mobility patterns to predict every missing location from an individual's social media timeline. We compare ILC with a state-of-the-art RNN baseline as well as methods that are optimized for next-location prediction only. For three major cities, ILC predicts the top 1 location for all missing locations in a timeline, at 1 and 2-hour resolution, with up to 77.2% accuracy (up to 6% better accuracy than all compared methods). Specifically, ILC also outperforms the RNN in settings of low data; both cases of very small number of users (under 50), as well as settings with more users, but with sparser timelines. In general, the RNN model needs a higher number of users to achieve the same performance as ILC. Overall, this work illustrates the tradeoff between prior knowledge of heuristics and more data, for an important societal problem of filling in entire timelines using freely available, but sparse social media data.
  • Recent progress in applying complex network theory to problems in quantum information has resulted in a beneficial crossover. Complex network methods have successfully been applied to transport and entanglement models while information physics is setting the stage for a theory of complex systems with quantum information-inspired methods. Novel quantum induced effects have been predicted in random graphs---where edges represent entangled links---and quantum computer algorithms have been proposed to offer enhancement for several network problems. Here we review the results at the cutting edge, pinpointing the similarities and the differences found at the intersection of these two fields.
  • Characterizing human values is a topic deeply interwoven with the sciences, humanities, art, and many other human endeavors. In recent years, a number of thinkers have argued that accelerating trends in computer science, cognitive science, and related disciplines foreshadow the creation of intelligent machines which meet and ultimately surpass the cognitive abilities of human beings, thereby entangling an understanding of human values with future technological development. Contemporary research accomplishments suggest sophisticated AI systems becoming widespread and responsible for managing many aspects of the modern world, from preemptively planning users' travel schedules and logistics, to fully autonomous vehicles, to domestic robots assisting in daily living. The extrapolation of these trends has been most forcefully described in the context of a hypothetical "intelligence explosion," in which the capabilities of an intelligent software agent would rapidly increase due to the presence of feedback loops unavailable to biological organisms. The possibility of superintelligent agents, or simply the widespread deployment of sophisticated, autonomous AI systems, highlights an important theoretical problem: the need to separate the cognitive and rational capacities of an agent from the fundamental goal structure, or value system, which constrains and guides the agent's actions. The "value alignment problem" is to specify a goal structure for autonomous agents compatible with human values. In this brief article, we suggest that recent ideas from affective neuroscience and related disciplines aimed at characterizing neurological and behavioral universals in the mammalian class provide important conceptual foundations relevant to describing human values. We argue that the notion of "mammalian value systems" points to a potential avenue for fundamental research in AI safety and AI ethics.
  • We propose a camera-based assistive text reading framework to help blind persons read text labels and product packaging from hand-held objects in their daily life. To isolate the object from untidy backgrounds or other surrounding objects in the camera vision, we initially propose an efficient and effective motion based method to define a region of interest (ROI) in the video by asking the user to tremble the object. This scheme extracts moving object region by a mixture-of-Gaussians-based background subtraction technique. In the extracted ROI, text localization and recognition are conducted to acquire text details. To automatically focus the text regions from the object ROI, we offer a novel text localization algorithm by learning gradient features of stroke orientations and distributions of edge pixels in an Adaboost model. Text characters in the localized text regions are then binarized and recognized by off-the-shelf optical character identification software. The renowned text codes are converted into audio output to the blind users. Performance of the suggested text localization algorithm is quantitatively evaluated on ICDAR-2003 and ICDAR-2011 Robust Reading Datasets. Experimental results demonstrate that our algorithm achieves the highest level of developments at present time. The proof-of-concept example is also evaluated on a dataset collected using ten blind persons to evaluate the effectiveness of the scheme. We explore the user interface issues and robustness of the algorithm in extracting and reading text from different objects with complex backgrounds.
  • We describe the course of a hackathon dedicated to the development of linguistic tools for Tibetan Buddhist studies. Over a period of five days, a group of seventeen scholars, scientists, and students developed and compared algorithms for intertextual alignment and text classification, along with some basic language tools, including a stemmer and word segmenter.
  • In this work we describe a simple MATLAB based language which allows to create randomized multiple choice questions with minimal effort. This language has been successfully tested at Flinders University by the author in a number of mathematics topics including Numerical Analysis, Abstract Algebra and Partial Differential Equations.
  • We present a general approach to automating ethical decisions, drawing on machine learning and computational social choice. In a nutshell, we propose to learn a model of societal preferences, and, when faced with a specific ethical dilemma at runtime, efficiently aggregate those preferences to identify a desirable choice. We provide a concrete algorithm that instantiates our approach; some of its crucial steps are informed by a new theory of swap-dominance efficient voting rules. Finally, we implement and evaluate a system for ethical decision making in the autonomous vehicle domain, using preference data collected from 1.3 million people through the Moral Machine website.
  • The Internet of Mobile Things encompasses stream data being generated by sensors, network communications that pull and push these data streams, as well as running processing and analytics that can effectively leverage actionable information for transportation planning, management, and business advantage. Edge computing emerges as a new paradigm that decentralizes the communication, computation, control and storage resources from the cloud to the edge of the network. This paper proposes an edge computing platform where mobile edge nodes are physical devices deployed on a transit bus where descriptive analytics is used to uncover meaningful patterns from real-time transit data streams. An application experiment is used to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of our proposed platform to support descriptive analytics at a mobile edge node and generate actionable information to transit managers.
  • Smartphones have ubiquitously integrated into our home and work environments, however, users normally rely on explicit but inefficient identification processes in a controlled environment. Therefore, when a device is stolen, a thief can have access to the owner's personal information and services against the stored password/s. As a result of this potential scenario, this work demonstrates the possibilities of legitimate user identification in a semi-controlled environment through the built-in smartphones motion dynamics captured by two different sensors. This is a two-fold process: sub-activity recognition followed by user/impostor identification. Prior to the identification; Extended Sammon Projection (ESP) method is used to reduce the redundancy among the features. To validate the proposed system, we first collected data from four users walking with their device freely placed in one of their pants pockets. Through extensive experimentation, we demonstrate that together time and frequency domain features optimized by ESP to train the wavelet kernel based extreme learning machine classifier is an effective system to identify the legitimate user or an impostor with \(97\%\) accuracy.
  • In the recent years, the rapid spread of mobile device has create the vast amount of mobile data. However, some shallow-structure models such as support vector machine (SVM) have difficulty dealing with high dimensional data with the development of mobile network. In this paper, we analyze mobile data to predict human trajectories in order to understand human mobility pattern via a deep-structure model called "DeepSpace". To the best of out knowledge, it is the first time that the deep learning approach is applied to predicting human trajectories. Furthermore, we develop the vanilla convolutional neural network (CNN) to be an online learning system, which can deal with the continuous mobile data stream. In general, "DeepSpace" consists of two different prediction models corresponding to different scales in space (the coarse prediction model and fine prediction models). This two models constitute a hierarchical structure, which enable the whole architecture to be run in parallel. Finally, we test our model based on the data usage detail records (UDRs) from the mobile cellular network in a city of southeastern China, instead of the call detail records (CDRs) which are widely used by others as usual. The experiment results show that "DeepSpace" is promising in human trajectories prediction.
  • The Internet of Things (IoT) represents a comprehensive environment that consists of a large number of smart devices interconnecting heterogeneous physical objects to the Internet. Many domains such as logistics, manufacturing, agriculture, urban computing, home automation, ambient assisted living and various ubiquitous computing applications have utilised IoT technologies. Meanwhile, Business Process Management Systems (BPMS) have become a successful and efficient solution for coordinated management and optimised utilisation of resources/entities. However, past BPMS have not considered many issues they will face in managing large scale connected heterogeneous IoT entities. Without fully understanding the behaviour, capability and state of the IoT entities, the BPMS can fail to manage the IoT integrated information systems. In this paper, we analyse existing BPMS for IoT and identify the limitations and their drawbacks based on Mobile Cloud Computing perspective. Later, we discuss a number of open challenges in BPMS for IoT.
  • Machine learning systems are increasingly used to support public sector decision-making across a variety of sectors. Given concerns around accountability in these domains, and amidst accusations of intentional or unintentional bias, there have been increased calls for transparency of these technologies. Few, however, have considered how logics and practices concerning transparency have been understood by those involved in the machine learning systems already being piloted and deployed in public bodies today. This short paper distils insights about transparency on the ground from interviews with 27 such actors, largely public servants and relevant contractors, across 5 OECD countries. Considering transparency and opacity in relation to trust and buy-in, better decision-making, and the avoidance of gaming, it seeks to provide useful insights for those hoping to develop socio-technical approaches to transparency that might be useful to practitioners on-the-ground. An extended, archival version of this paper is available as Veale M., Van Kleek M., & Binns R. (2018). `Fairness and accountability design needs for algorithmic support in high-stakes public sector decision-making' Proceedings of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI'18), http://doi.org/10.1145/3173574.3174014.
  • Many societal decision problems lie in high-dimensional continuous spaces not amenable to the voting techniques common for their discrete or single-dimensional counterparts. These problems are typically discretized before running an election or decided upon through negotiation by representatives. We propose a algorithm called {\sc Iterative Local Voting} for collective decision-making in this setting. In this algorithm, voters are sequentially sampled and asked to modify a candidate solution within some local neighborhood of its current value, as defined by a ball in some chosen norm, with the size of the ball shrinking at a specified rate. We first prove the convergence of this algorithm under appropriate choices of neighborhoods to Pareto optimal solutions with desirable fairness properties in certain natural settings: when the voters' utilities can be expressed in terms of some form of distance from their ideal solution, and when these utilities are additively decomposable across dimensions. In many of these cases, we obtain convergence to the societal welfare maximizing solution. We then describe an experiment in which we test our algorithm for the decision of the U.S. Federal Budget on Mechanical Turk with over 2,000 workers, employing neighborhoods defined by $\mathcal{L}^1, \mathcal{L}^2$ and $\mathcal{L}^\infty$ balls. We make several observations that inform future implementations of such a procedure.
  • The increasing availability and adoption of shared vehicles as an alternative to personally-owned cars presents ample opportunities for achieving more efficient transportation in cities. With private cars spending on the average over 95\% of the time parked, one of the possible benefits of shared mobility is the reduced need for parking space. While widely discussed, a systematic quantification of these benefits as a function of mobility demand and sharing models is still mostly lacking in the literature. As a first step in this direction, this paper focuses on a type of private mobility which, although specific, is a major contributor to traffic congestion and parking needs, namely, home-work commuting. We develop a data-driven methodology for estimating commuter parking needs in different shared mobility models, including a model where self-driving vehicles are used to partially compensate flow imbalance typical of commuting, and further reduce parking infrastructure at the expense of increased traveled kilometers. We consider the city of Singapore as a case study, and produce very encouraging results showing that the gradual transition to shared mobility models will bring tangible reductions in parking infrastructure. In the future-looking, self-driving vehicle scenario, our analysis suggests that up to 50\% reduction in parking needs can be achieved at the expense of increasing total traveled kilometers of less than 2\%.
  • The Shannon-Weaver model of linear information transmission is extended with two loops potentially generating redundancies: (i) meaning is provided locally to the information from the perspective of hindsight, and (ii) meanings can be codified differently and then refer to other horizons of meaning. Thus, three layers are distinguished: variations in the communications, historical organization at each moment of time, and evolutionary self-organization of the codes of communication over time. Furthermore, the codes of communication can functionally be different and then the system is both horizontally and vertically differentiated. All these subdynamics operate in parallel and necessarily generate uncertainty. However, meaningful information can be considered as the specific selection of a signal from the noise; the codes of communication are social constructs that can generate redundancy by giving different meanings to the same information. Reflexively, one can translate among codes in more elaborate discourses. The second (instantiating) layer can be operationalized in terms of semantic maps using the vector space model; the third in terms of mutual redundancy among the latent dimensions of the vector space. Using Blaise Cronin's {\oe}uvre, the different operations of the three layers are demonstrated empirically.
  • Trends change rapidly in today's world, prompting this key question: What is the mechanism behind the emergence of new trends? By representing real-world dynamic systems as complex networks, the emergence of new trends can be symbolized by vertices that "shine." That is, at a specific time interval in a network's life, certain vertices become increasingly connected to other vertices. This process creates new high-degree vertices, i.e., network stars. Thus, to study trends, we must look at how networks evolve over time and determine how the stars behave. In our research, we constructed the largest publicly available network evolution dataset to date, which contains 38,000 real-world networks and 2.5 million graphs. Then, we performed the first precise wide-scale analysis of the evolution of networks with various scales. Three primary observations resulted: (a) links are most prevalent among vertices that join a network at a similar time; (b) the rate that new vertices join a network is a central factor in molding a network's topology; and (c) the emergence of network stars (high-degree vertices) is correlated with fast-growing networks. We applied our learnings to develop a flexible network-generation model based on large-scale, real-world data. This model gives a better understanding of how stars rise and fall within networks, and is applicable to dynamic systems both in nature and society.
  • A large number of statistical decision problems in the social sciences and beyond can be framed as a (contextual) multi-armed bandit problem. However, it is notoriously hard to develop and evaluate policies that tackle these types of problem, and to use such policies in applied studies. To address this issue, this paper introduces StreamingBandit, a Python web application for developing and testing bandit policies in field studies. StreamingBandit can sequentially select treatments using (online) policies in real time. Once StreamingBandit is implemented in an applied context, different policies can be tested, altered, nested, and compared. StreamingBandit makes it easy to apply a multitude of bandit policies for sequential allocation in field experiments, and allows for the quick development and re-use of novel policies. In this article, we detail the implementation logic of StreamingBandit and provide several examples of its use.
  • We propose a hybrid model of differential privacy that considers a combination of regular and opt-in users who desire the differential privacy guarantees of the local privacy model and the trusted curator model, respectively. We demonstrate that within this model, it is possible to design a new type of blended algorithm for the task of privately computing the head of a search log. This blended approach provides significant improvements in the utility of obtained data compared to related work while providing users with their desired privacy guarantees. Specifically, on two large search click data sets, comprising 1.75 and 16 GB respectively, our approach attains NDCG values exceeding 95% across a range of privacy budget values.
  • Security surveillance is one of the most important issues in smart cities, especially in an era of terrorism. Deploying a number of (video) cameras is a common surveillance approach. Given the never-ending power offered by vehicles to metropolises, exploiting vehicle traffic to design camera placement strategies could potentially facilitate security surveillance. This article constitutes the first effort toward building the linkage between vehicle traffic and security surveillance, which is a critical problem for smart cities. We expect our study could influence the decision making of surveillance camera placement, and foster more research of principled ways of security surveillance beneficial to our physical-world life. Code has been made publicly available.
  • What do college students reveal to their peers on social media under complete anonymity? Do their campus environments relate to the topics of their disclosure? To answer these questions, I analyze Facebook confessions pages. Popular on hundreds of college campuses, these pages allow students to anonymously post personal confessions on a public community forum. In this preliminary research note, I analyze several explanatory factors of online student confessional behavior. Aggregating nearly 200,000 confessions posts spanning a period of 3 years, I combine Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) with human verification through Mechanical Turk to scalably identify topics in these online confessions. Where possible, I also link posts to real-world news events parsed from Twitter. I find that confessions mentioning socioeconomics as well as mental and physical health occur more often at top-ranking, expensive private colleges. While event-related confessions most often mention timely school-related events, many mention global and domestic events outside of the local campus sphere. Results suggest that undergraduates from different campuses disclose about topics such as race, socioeonomics, and politics differently, but in aggregate, post in similar patterns over time. Additionally, results confirm that anonymous Facebook confessors receive support for confessions on important, but taboo topics such as health and socioeconomic status.
  • We provide an overview of PSI ("a Private data Sharing Interface"), a system we are developing to enable researchers in the social sciences and other fields to share and explore privacy-sensitive datasets with the strong privacy protections of differential privacy.
  • Online media outlets, in a bid to expand their reach and subsequently increase revenue through ad monetisation, have begun adopting clickbait techniques to lure readers to click on articles. The article fails to fulfill the promise made by the headline. Traditional methods for clickbait detection have relied heavily on feature engineering which, in turn, is dependent on the dataset it is built for. The application of neural networks for this task has only been explored partially. We propose a novel approach considering all information found in a social media post. We train a bidirectional LSTM with an attention mechanism to learn the extent to which a word contributes to the post's clickbait score in a differential manner. We also employ a Siamese net to capture the similarity between source and target information. Information gleaned from images has not been considered in previous approaches. We learn image embeddings from large amounts of data using Convolutional Neural Networks to add another layer of complexity to our model. Finally, we concatenate the outputs from the three separate components, serving it as input to a fully connected layer. We conduct experiments over a test corpus of 19538 social media posts, attaining an F1 score of 65.37% on the dataset bettering the previous state-of-the-art, as well as other proposed approaches, feature engineering or otherwise.