• The key challenge in multiagent learning is learning a best response to the behaviour of other agents, which may be non-stationary: if the other agents adapt their strategy as well, the learning target moves. Disparate streams of research have approached non-stationarity from several angles, which make a variety of implicit assumptions that make it hard to keep an overview of the state of the art and to validate the innovation and significance of new works. This survey presents a coherent overview of work that addresses opponent-induced non-stationarity with tools from game theory, reinforcement learning and multi-armed bandits. Further, we reflect on the principle approaches how algorithms model and cope with this non-stationarity, arriving at a new framework and five categories (in increasing order of sophistication): ignore, forget, respond to target models, learn models, and theory of mind. A wide range of state-of-the-art algorithms is classified into a taxonomy, using these categories and key characteristics of the environment (e.g., observability) and adaptation behaviour of the opponents (e.g., smooth, abrupt). To clarify even further we present illustrative variations of one domain, contrasting the strengths and limitations of each category. Finally, we discuss in which environments the different approaches yield most merit, and point to promising avenues of future research.
  • Collective, especially group-based, managerial decision making is crucial in organizations. Using an evolutionary theoretic approach to collective decision making, agent-based simulations were conducted to investigate how human collective decision making would be affected by the agents' diversity in problem understanding and/or behavior in discussion, as well as by their social network structure. Simulation results indicated that groups with consistent problem understanding tended to produce higher utility values of ideas and displayed better decision convergence, but only if there was no group-level bias in collective problem understanding. Simulation results also indicated the importance of balance between selection-oriented (i.e., exploitative) and variation-oriented (i.e., explorative) behaviors in discussion to achieve quality final decisions. Expanding the group size and introducing non-trivial social network structure generally improved the quality of ideas at the cost of decision convergence. Simulations with different social network topologies revealed collective decision making on small-world networks with high local clustering tended to achieve highest decision quality more often than on random or scale-free networks. Implications of this evolutionary theory and simulation approach for future managerial research on collective, group, and multi-level decision making are discussed.
  • The beer game is a widely used in-class game that is played in supply chain management classes to demonstrate the bullwhip effect. The game is a decentralized, multi-agent, cooperative problem that can be modeled as a serial supply chain network in which agents cooperatively attempt to minimize the total cost of the network even though each agent can only observe its own local information. Each agent chooses order quantities to replenish its stock. Under some conditions, a base-stock replenishment policy is known to be optimal. However, in a decentralized supply chain in which some agents (stages) may act irrationally (as they do in the beer game), there is no known optimal policy for an agent wishing to act optimally. We propose a machine learning algorithm, based on deep Q-networks, to optimize the replenishment decisions at a given stage. When playing alongside agents who follow a base-stock policy, our algorithm obtains near-optimal order quantities. It performs much better than a base-stock policy when the other agents use a more realistic model of human ordering behavior. Unlike most other algorithms in the literature, our algorithm does not have any limits on the beer game parameter values. Like any deep learning algorithm, training the algorithm can be computationally intensive, but this can be performed ahead of time; the algorithm executes in real time when the game is played. Moreover, we propose a transfer learning approach so that the training performed for one agent and one set of cost coefficients can be adapted quickly for other agents and costs. Our algorithm can be extended to other decentralized multi-agent cooperative games with partially observed information, which is a common type of situation in real-world supply chain problems.
  • Electric vehicles (EVs) are expected to be a major component of the smart grid. The rapid proliferation of EVs will introduce an unprecedented load on the existing electric grid due to the charging/discharging behavior of the EVs, thus motivating the need for novel approaches for routing EVs across the grid. In this paper, a novel gametheoretic framework for smart routing of EVs within the smart grid is proposed. The goal of this framework is to balance the electricity load across the grid while taking into account the traffic congestion and the waiting time at charging stations. The EV routing problem is formulated as a noncooperative game. For this game, it is shown that selfish behavior of EVs will result in a pure-strategy Nash equilibrium with the price of anarchy upper bounded by the variance of the ground load induced by the residential, industrial, or commercial users. Moreover, the results are extended to capture the stochastic nature of induced ground load as well as the subjective behavior of the owners of EVs as captured by using notions from the behavioral framework of prospect theory. Simulation results provide new insights on more efficient energy pricing at charging stations and under more realistic grid conditions.
  • In this paper, we develop a class of decentralized algorithms for solving a convex resource allocation problem in a network of $n$ agents, where the agent objectives are decoupled while the resource constraints are coupled. The agents communicate over a connected undirected graph, and they want to collaboratively determine a solution to the overall network problem, while each agent only communicates with its neighbors. We first study the connection between the decentralized resource allocation problem and the decentralized consensus optimization problem. Then, using a class of algorithms for solving consensus optimization problems, we propose a novel class of decentralized schemes for solving resource allocation problems in a distributed manner. Specifically, we first propose an algorithm for solving the resource allocation problem with an $o(1/k)$ convergence rate guarantee when the agents' objective functions are generally convex (could be nondifferentiable) and per agent local convex constraints are allowed; We then propose a gradient-based algorithm for solving the resource allocation problem when per agent local constraints are absent and show that such scheme can achieve geometric rate when the objective functions are strongly convex and have Lipschitz continuous gradients. We have also provided scalability/network dependency analysis. Based on these two algorithms, we have further proposed a gradient projection-based algorithm which can handle smooth objective and simple constraints more efficiently. Numerical experiments demonstrates the viability and performance of all the proposed algorithms.
  • Many important stable matching problems are known to be NP-hard, even when strong restrictions are placed on the input. In this paper we seek to identify structural properties of instances of stable matching problems which will allow us to design efficient algorithms using elementary techniques. We focus on the setting in which all agents involved in some matching problem can be partitioned into k different types, where the type of an agent determines his or her preferences, and agents have preferences over types (which may be refined by more detailed preferences within a single type). This situation would arise in practice if agents form preferences solely based on some small collection of agents' attributes. We also consider a generalisation in which each agent may consider some small collection of other agents to be exceptional, and rank these in a way that is not consistent with their types; this could happen in practice if agents have prior contact with a small number of candidates. We show that (for the case without exceptions), several well-studied NP-hard stable matching problems including Max SMTI (that of finding the maximum cardinality stable matching in an instance of stable marriage with ties and incomplete lists) belong to the parameterised complexity class FPT when parameterised by the number of different types of agents needed to describe the instance. For Max SMTI this tractability result can be extended to the setting in which each agent promotes at most one `exceptional' candidate to the top of his/her list (when preferences within types are not refined), but the problem remains NP-hard if preference lists can contain two or more exceptions and the exceptional candidates can be placed anywhere in the preference lists, even if the number of types is bounded by a constant.
  • To well understand crowd behavior, microscopic models have been developed in recent decades, in which an individual's behavioral/psychological status can be modeled and simulated. A well-known model is the social-force model innovated by physical scientists (Helbing and Molnar, 1995; Helbing, Farkas and Vicsek, 2000; Helbing et al., 2002). This model has been widely accepted and mainly used in simulation of crowd evacuation in the past decade. A problem, however, is that the testing results of the model were not explained in consistency with the psychological findings, resulting in misunderstanding of the model by psychologists. This paper will bridge the gap between psychological studies and physical explanation about this model. We reinterpret this physics-based model from a psychological perspective, clarifying that the model is consistent with psychological theories on stress, including time-related stress and interpersonal stress. Based on the conception of stress, we renew the model at both micro-and-macro level, referring to multi-agent simulation in a microscopic sense and fluid-based analysis in a macroscopic sense. The cognition and behavior of individual agents are critically modeled as response to environmental stimuli. Existing simulation results such as faster-is-slower effect will be reinterpreted by Yerkes-Dodson law, and herding and grouping effect are further discussed by integrating attraction into the social force. In brief the social-force model exhibits a bridge between the physics laws and psychological principles regarding crowd motion, and this paper will renew and reinterpret the model on the foundation of psychological studies.
  • Multi-target tracking is an important problem in civilian and military applications. This paper investigates multi-target tracking in distributed sensor networks. Data association, which arises particularly in multi-object scenarios, can be tackled by various solutions. We consider sequential Monte Carlo implementations of the Probability Hypothesis Density (PHD) filter based on random finite sets. This approach circumvents the data association issue by jointly estimating all targets in the region of interest. To this end, we develop the Diffusion Particle PHD Filter (D-PPHDF) as well as a centralized version, called the Multi-Sensor Particle PHD Filter (MS-PPHDF). Their performance is evaluated in terms of the Optimal Subpattern Assignment (OSPA) metric, benchmarked against a distributed extension of the Posterior Cram\'er-Rao Lower Bound (PCRLB), and compared to the performance of an existing distributed PHD Particle Filter. Furthermore, the robustness of the proposed tracking algorithms against outliers and their performance with respect to different amounts of clutter is investigated.
  • We introduce the problem of assigning resources to improve their utilization. The motivation comes from settings where agents have uncertainty about their own values for using a resource, and where it is in the interest of a group that resources be used and not wasted. Done in the right way, improved utilization maximizes social welfare--- balancing the utility of a high value but unreliable agent with the group's preference that resources be used. We introduce the family of contingent payment mechanisms (CP), which may charge an agent contingent on use (a penalty). A CP mechanism is parameterized by a maximum penalty, and has a dominant-strategy equilibrium. Under a set of axiomatic properties, we establish welfare-optimality for the special case CP(W), with CP instantiated for a maximum penalty equal to societal value W for utilization. CP(W) is not dominated for expected welfare by any other mechanism, and second, amongst mechanisms that always allocate the resource and have a simple indirect structure, CP(W) strictly dominates every other mechanism. The special case with no upper bound on penalty, the contingent second-price mechanism, maximizes utilization. We extend the mechanisms to assign multiple, heterogeneous resources, and present a simulation study of the welfare properties of these mechanisms.
  • A fundamental challenge in multiagent systems is to design local control algorithms to ensure a desirable collective behaviour. The information available to the agents, gathered either through communication or sensing, naturally restricts the achievable performance. Hence, it is fundamental to identify what piece of information is valuable and can be exploited to design control laws with enhanced performance guarantees. This paper studies the case when such information is uncertain or inaccessible for a class of submodular resource allocation problems termed covering problems. In the first part of this work we pinpoint a fundamental risk-reward tradeoff faced by the system operator when conditioning the control design on a valuable but uncertain piece of information, which we refer to as the cardinality, that represents the maximum number of agents that can simultaneously select any given resource. Building on this analysis, we propose a distributed algorithm that allows agents to learn the cardinality while adjusting their behaviour over time. This algorithm is proved to perform on par or better to the optimal design obtained when the exact cardinality is known a priori.
  • Many societal decision problems lie in high-dimensional continuous spaces not amenable to the voting techniques common for their discrete or single-dimensional counterparts. These problems are typically discretized before running an election or decided upon through negotiation by representatives. We propose a algorithm called {\sc Iterative Local Voting} for collective decision-making in this setting. In this algorithm, voters are sequentially sampled and asked to modify a candidate solution within some local neighborhood of its current value, as defined by a ball in some chosen norm, with the size of the ball shrinking at a specified rate. We first prove the convergence of this algorithm under appropriate choices of neighborhoods to Pareto optimal solutions with desirable fairness properties in certain natural settings: when the voters' utilities can be expressed in terms of some form of distance from their ideal solution, and when these utilities are additively decomposable across dimensions. In many of these cases, we obtain convergence to the societal welfare maximizing solution. We then describe an experiment in which we test our algorithm for the decision of the U.S. Federal Budget on Mechanical Turk with over 2,000 workers, employing neighborhoods defined by $\mathcal{L}^1, \mathcal{L}^2$ and $\mathcal{L}^\infty$ balls. We make several observations that inform future implementations of such a procedure.
  • We consider social welfare functions that satisfy Arrow's classic axioms of independence of irrelevant alternatives and Pareto optimality when the outcome space is the convex hull of some finite set of alternatives. Individual and collective preferences are assumed to be continuous and convex, which guarantees the existence of maximal elements and the consistency of choice functions that return these elements, even without insisting on transitivity. We provide characterizations of both the domains of preferences and the social welfare functions that allow for anonymous Arrovian aggregation. The domains admit arbitrary preferences over alternatives, which completely determine an agent's preferences over all mixed outcomes. On these domains, Arrow's impossibility turns into a complete characterization of a unique social welfare function, which can be readily applied in settings involving divisible resources such as probability, time, or money.
  • We present two distributed methods for the estimation of the kinematic parameters, the dynamic parameters, and the kinematic state of an unknown planar body manipulated by a decentralized multi-agent system. The proposed approaches rely on the rigid body kinematics and dynamics, on nonlinear observation theory, and on consensus algorithms. The only three requirements are that each agent can exert a 2D wrench on the load, it can measure the velocity of its contact point, and that the communication graph is connected. Both theoretical nonlinear observability analysis and convergence proofs are provided. The first method assumes constant parameters while the second one can deal with time-varying parameters and can be applied in parallel to any task-oriented control law. For the cases in which a control law is not provided, we propose a distributed and safe control strategy satisfying the observability condition. The effectiveness and robustness of the estimation strategy is showcased by means of realistic MonteCarlo simulations.
  • Due to the complexity of the natural world, a programmer cannot foresee all possible situations, a connected and autonomous vehicle (CAV) will face during its operation, and hence, CAVs will need to learn to make decisions autonomously. Due to the sensing of its surroundings and information exchanged with other vehicles and road infrastructure, a CAV will have access to large amounts of useful data. While different control algorithms have been proposed for CAVs, the benefits brought about by connectedness of autonomous vehicles to other vehicles and to the infrastructure, and its implications on policy learning has not been investigated in literature. This paper investigates a data driven driving policy learning framework through an agent-based modelling approaches. The contributions of the paper are two-fold. A dynamic programming framework is proposed for in-vehicle policy learning with and without connectivity to neighboring vehicles. The simulation results indicate that while a CAV can learn to make autonomous decisions, vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication of information improves this capability. Furthermore, to overcome the limitations of sensing in a CAV, the paper proposes a novel concept for infrastructure-led policy learning and communication with autonomous vehicles. In infrastructure-led policy learning, road-side infrastructure senses and captures successful vehicle maneuvers and learns an optimal policy from those temporal sequences, and when a vehicle approaches the road-side unit, the policy is communicated to the CAV. Deep-imitation learning methodology is proposed to develop such an infrastructure-led policy learning framework.
  • Two fundamental algorithm-design paradigms are Tree Search and Dynamic Programming. The techniques used therein have been shown to complement one another when solving the complete set partitioning problem, also known as the coalition structure generation problem [5]. Inspired by this observation, we develop in this paper an algorithm to solve the coalition structure generation problem on graphs, where the goal is to identifying an optimal partition of a graph into connected subgraphs. More specifically, we develop a new depth-first search algorithm, and combine it with an existing dynamic programming algorithm due to Vinyals et al. [9]. The resulting hybrid algorithm is empirically shown to significantly outperform both its constituent parts when the subset-evaluation function happens to have certain intuitive properties.
  • This paper presents a methodology for simulating the Internet of Things (IoT) using multi-level simulation models. With respect to conventional simulators, this approach allows us to tune the level of detail of different parts of the model without compromising the scalability of the simulation. As a use case, we have developed a two-level simulator to study the deployment of smart services over rural territories. The higher level is base on a coarse grained, agent-based adaptive parallel and distributed simulator. When needed, this simulator spawns OMNeT++ model instances to evaluate in more detail the issues concerned with wireless communications in restricted areas of the simulated world. The performance evaluation confirms the viability of multi-level simulations for IoT environments.
  • In this paper we consider the problem of identifying intersections between two sets of d-dimensional axis-parallel rectangles. This is a common problem that arises in many agent-based simulation studies, and is of central importance in the context of High Level Architecture (HLA), where it is at the core of the Data Distribution Management (DDM) service. Several realizations of the DDM service have been proposed; however, many of them are either inefficient or inherently sequential. These are serious limitations since multicore processors are now ubiquitous, and DDM algorithms -- being CPU-intensive -- could benefit from additional computing power. We propose a parallel version of the Sort-Based Matching algorithm for shared-memory multiprocessors. Sort-Based Matching is one of the most efficient serial algorithms for the DDM problem, but is quite difficult to parallelize due to data dependencies. We describe the algorithm and compute its asymptotic running time; we complete the analysis by assessing its performance and scalability through extensive experiments on two commodity multicore systems based on a dual socket Intel Xeon processor, and a single socket Intel Core i7 processor.
  • Networked systems are ubiquitous in today's world with examples spanning from ecology to the social and engineering sciences. Much of the research in networked systems is analytical, where the focus is on characterizing (and potentially influencing) the emergent collective behavior, e.g., predicting the distribution of animals and humans in a given ecological system. A more recent trend of research focuses on the design of networked systems capable of achieving diverse and highly coordinated collective behavior in the absence of centralized control, e.g., designing a team of unmanned aerial vehicles to monitor the perimeter of a wild fire. Unfortunately, our understanding of how microscopic behavior impacts the macroscopic phenomena in network systems is inadequate for meeting the demands of this emerging design task. This paper focuses on an instance of this design task for a well-studied class of coverage problems where the goal is to allocate a collection of agents to a subset of resources in order to maximize the cumulative value of the covered resources. Our first result demonstrates that any agent-based algorithm relying solely on local information induces a fundamental trade-off between the best and worst case performance guarantees, as measured by the price of anarchy and price of stability. This result highlights how the information available to the agents translates to constraints on the achievable efficiency guarantees in networked control systems. Our second results demonstrates how to use an additional piece of system-level information to breach these limitations, thereby improving the system's performance.
  • Swarm systems constitute a challenging problem for reinforcement learning (RL) as the algorithm needs to learn decentralized control policies that can cope with limited local sensing and communication abilities of the agents. While it is often difficult to directly define the behavior of the agents, simple communication protocols can be defined more easily using prior knowledge about the given task. In this paper, we propose a number of simple communication protocols that can be exploited by deep reinforcement learning to find decentralized control policies in a multi-robot swarm environment. The protocols are based on histograms that encode the local neighborhood relations of the agents and can also transmit task-specific information, such as the shortest distance and direction to a desired target. In our framework, we use an adaptation of Trust Region Policy Optimization to learn complex collaborative tasks, such as formation building and building a communication link. We evaluate our findings in a simulated 2D-physics environment, and compare the implications of different communication protocols.
  • We study the computations that Bayesian agents undertake when exchanging opinions over a network. The agents act repeatedly on their private information and take myopic actions that maximize their expected utility according to a fully rational posterior belief. We show that such computations are NP-hard for two natural utility functions: one with binary actions, and another where agents reveal their posterior beliefs. In fact, we show that distinguishing between posteriors that are concentrated on different states of the world is NP-hard. Therefore, even approximating the Bayesian posterior beliefs is hard. We also describe a natural search algorithm to compute agents' actions, which we call elimination of impossible signals, and show that if the network is transitive, the algorithm can be modified to run in polynomial time.
  • Two fundamental problems in computational game theory are computing a Nash equilibrium and learning to exploit opponents given observations of their play (opponent exploitation). The latter is perhaps even more important than the former: Nash equilibrium does not have a compelling theoretical justification in game classes other than two-player zero-sum, and for all games one can potentially do better by exploiting perceived weaknesses of the opponent than by following a static equilibrium strategy throughout the match. The natural setting for opponent exploitation is the Bayesian setting where we have a prior model that is integrated with observations to create a posterior opponent model that we respond to. The most natural, and a well-studied prior distribution is the Dirichlet distribution. An exact polynomial-time algorithm is known for best-responding to the posterior distribution for an opponent assuming a Dirichlet prior with multinomial sampling in normal-form games; however, for imperfect-information games the best known algorithm is based on approximating an infinite integral without theoretical guarantees. We present the first exact algorithm for a natural class of imperfect-information games. We demonstrate that our algorithm runs quickly in practice and outperforms the best prior approaches. We also present an algorithm for the uniform prior setting.
  • We study the interaction between a fleet of electric, self-driving vehicles servicing on-demand transportation requests (referred to as Autonomous Mobility-on-Demand, or AMoD, system) and the electric power network. We propose a model that captures the coupling between the two systems stemming from the vehicles' charging requirements and captures time-varying customer demand and power generation costs, road congestion, battery depreciation, and power transmission and distribution constraints. We then leverage the model to jointly optimize the operation of both systems. We devise an algorithmic procedure to losslessly reduce the problem size by bundling customer requests, allowing it to be efficiently solved by off-the-shelf linear programming solvers. Next, we show that the socially optimal solution to the joint problem can be enforced as a general equilibrium, and we provide a dual decomposition algorithm that allows self-interested agents to compute the market clearing prices without sharing private information. We assess the performance of the mode by studying a hypothetical AMoD system in Dallas-Fort Worth and its impact on the Texas power network. Lack of coordination between the AMoD system and the power network can cause a 4.4% increase in the price of electricity in Dallas-Fort Worth; conversely, coordination between the AMoD system and the power network could reduce electricity expenditure compared to the case where no cars are present (despite the increased demand for electricity) and yield savings of up $147M/year. Finally, we provide a receding-horizon implementation and assess its performance with agent-based simulations. Collectively, the results of this paper provide a first-of-a-kind characterization of the interaction between electric-powered AMoD systems and the power network, and shed additional light on the economic and societal value of AMoD.
  • In this paper, we develop a distributed intermittent communication and task planning framework for mobile robot teams. The goal of the robots is to accomplish complex tasks, captured by local Linear Temporal Logic formulas, and share the collected information with all other robots and possibly also with a user. Specifically, we consider situations where the robot communication capabilities are not sufficient to form reliable and connected networks while the robots move to accomplish their tasks. In this case, intermittent communication protocols are necessary that allow the robots to temporarily disconnect from the network in order to accomplish their tasks free of communication constraints. We assume that the robots can only communicate with each other when they meet at common locations in space. Our distributed control framework jointly determines local plans that allow all robots fulfill their assigned temporal tasks, sequences of communication events that guarantee information exchange infinitely often, and optimal communication locations that minimize a desired distance metric. Simulation results verify the efficacy of the proposed controllers.
  • This article introduces new tools to study self-organisation in a family of simple cellular automata which contain some particle-like objects with good collision properties (coalescence) in their time evolution. We draw an initial configuration at random according to some initial $\sigma$-ergodic measure $\mu$, and use the limit measure to descrbe the asymptotic behaviour of the automata. We first take a qualitative approach, i.e. we obtain information on the limit measure(s). We prove that only particles moving in one particular direction can persist asymptotically. This provides some previously unknown information on the limit measures of various deterministic and probabilistic cellular automata: 3 and 4-cyclic cellular automata (introduced in [Fis90b]), one-sided captive cellular automata (introduced in [The04]), N. Fat{\`e}s' candidate to solve the density classification problem [Fat13], self stabilization process toward a discrete line [RR15]... In a second time we restrict our study to to a subclass, the gliders cellular automata. For this class we show quantitative results, consisting in the asymptotic law of some parameters: the entry times (generalising [KFD11]), the density of particles and the rate of convergence to the limit measure.
  • Intelligent systems for the annotation of media content are increasingly being used for the automation of parts of social science research. In this domain the problem of integrating various Artificial Intelligence (AI) algorithms into a single intelligent system arises spontaneously. As part of our ongoing effort in automating media content analysis for the social sciences, we have built a modular system by combining multiple AI modules into a flexible framework in which they can cooperate in complex tasks. Our system combines data gathering, machine translation, topic classification, extraction and annotation of entities and social networks, as well as many other tasks that have been perfected over the past years of AI research. Over the last few years, it has allowed us to realise a series of scientific studies over a vast range of applications including comparative studies between news outlets and media content in different countries, modelling of user preferences, and monitoring public mood. The framework is flexible and allows the design and implementation of modular agents, where simple modules cooperate in the annotation of a large dataset without central coordination.