• Humans possess the capability to reason at an abstract level and to structure information into abstract categories, but the underlying neural processes have remained unknown. Experimental evidence has recently emerged for the organization of an important aspect of abstract reasoning: for assigning words to semantic roles in a sentence, such as agent (or subject) and patient (or object). Using minimal assumptions, we show how such a binding of words to semantic roles emerges in a generic spiking neural network through Hebbian plasticity. The resulting model is consistent with the experimental data and enables new computational functionalities such as structured information retrieval, copying data, and comparisons. It thus provides a basis for the implementation of more demanding cognitive computations by networks of spiking neurons.
  • A quantitative understanding of organism-level behavior requires predictive models that can capture the richness of behavioral phenotypes, yet are simple enough to connect with underlying mechanistic processes. Here we investigate the motile behavior of nematodes at the level of their translational motion on surfaces driven by undulatory propulsion. We broadly sample the nematode behavioral repertoire by measuring motile trajectories of the canonical lab strain $C. elegans$ N2 as well as wild strains and distant species. We focus on trajectory dynamics over timescales spanning the transition from ballistic (straight) to diffusive (random) movement and find that salient features of the motility statistics are captured by a random walk model with independent dynamics in the speed, bearing and reversal events. We show that the model parameters vary among species in a correlated, low-dimensional manner suggestive of a common mode of behavioral control and a trade-off between exploration and exploitation. The distribution of phenotypes along this primary mode of variation reveals that not only the mean but also the variance varies considerably across strains, suggesting that these nematode lineages employ contrasting ``bet-hedging'' strategies for foraging.
  • Despite our familiarity with and fondness of humor, until relatively recently very little was known about the underlying psychology of this complex and nuanced phenomenon. Recently, however, cognitive psychologists have begun investigating how people understand humor and why we find certain things funny. This chapter introduces a new cognitive approach to modeling humor that we refer to as the 'quantum approach', which will be explained here in intuitive, non-mathematical terms later (a formal treatment can be found in Gabora & Kitto, 2017). What makes the quantum approach a promising candidate for a theory of humor is that it can be useful for representing states of ambiguity, and it defines states and variables with reference to a context. Contextuality and ambiguity both play a key role in humor, which often hangs on an ambiguous word, phrase, or situation that might not make sense, or even be socially acceptable outside the specific context of the joke. The quantum approach does not attempt to explain all aspects of humor, such as the contagious quality of laughter, or why children tease each other, or why people might find it funny when someone is hit in the face with a pie (and laugh even if they know it will happen in advance); what it aims to do is to mathematically represent the underlying cognitive process of "getting" a joke. After briefly overviewing the relevant historical antecedents of the quantum approach and other related approaches in cognitive psychology, we present the theoretical basis of our approach, and outline a recent study that provides empirical support for it.
  • Even this saying itself is a variant of a similar statement attributed to Bernard of Chartres in the 12th Century, and inspired the title for a book by Steven Hawking and an album by Oasis. Creative ideas beget other creative ideas and, as a result, modifications accumulate, and we see an overall increase in the complexity of cultural novelty over time, a phenomenon sometimes referred to as the ratchet effect (Tomasello, Kruger, & Ratner, 1993). Although we may never meet the people or objects that creatively influence us, by assimilating what we encounter around us and bringing to bear our own insights and perspectives, we all contribute in our own way, however small, to a second evolutionary process -- the evolution of culture. This chapter explores how we can better understand culture by understanding the creative processes that fuel it, and better understand creativity by examining it from its cultural context. First, we look at some theoretical frameworks for how culture evolves and what these frameworks imply for the role of creativity. Then we will see how questions about the relationship between creativity and cultural evolution have been addressed using an agent-based model. We will also discuss studies of how creative outputs are influenced, in perhaps unexpected ways, by other ideas and individuals, and how individual creative styles "peek through" cultural outputs in different domains.
  • This chapter takes as its departure point a neural level theory of insight that arose from studies of the sparse, distributed, content-addressable architecture of associative memory. It is argued that convergent thought is most fruitfully characterized in terms of, not the generation of a single correct solution (as it is conventionally construed), but using concepts in their most compact form by activating neural cell assemblies that respond to their most typical properties. This allows them to be deployed in a conventional manner such that effort is reserved for exploring causal relationships. Conversely, it is argued that divergent thought is most fruitfully characterized in terms of, not the generation of multiple solutions (as it is conventionally construed), but using concepts in a form that is, albeit expanded, constrained by the situation, by activating neural cell assemblies that respond to context-specific atypical properties. This allows them to be deployed in a manner that is conducive to exploring unconventional yet potentially relevant associations, and unearthing potentially useful relationships of correlation. Thus, divergent thought can involve as few as one idea. This proposal is compatible with widespread beliefs that (1) most creative tasks require not many solutions but one, yet entail both divergent and convergent thinking, and (2) not all problems with multiple solutions require creative thinking, and conversely, some problems with single solution do require creative thought. The chapter discusses how the ability to shift between convergent and divergent modes of thought may have evolved, and it concludes with educational and vocational implications.
  • The association between light and psychological states has a long history and permeates our language. LIVEIA (Light-based Immersive Visualization Environment for Imaginative Actualization) is a new immersive, interactive technology that uses physical light as a metaphor for visualizing peoples' inner lives and relationships. This paper outlines its educational value, as a tool for understanding and explaining aspects of how people think and interact, and its potential therapeutic value as a form of art therapy in which the artwork has straightforwardly interpretable symbolic meanings.
  • In many daily tasks we make multiple decisions before reaching a goal. In order to learn such sequences of decisions, a mechanism to link earlier actions to later reward is necessary. Reinforcement learning theory suggests two classes of algorithms solving this credit assignment problem: In classic temporal-difference learning, earlier actions receive reward information only after multiple repetitions of the task, whereas models with eligibility traces reinforce entire sequences of actions from a single experience (one-shot). Here we asked whether humans use eligibility traces. We developed a novel paradigm to directly observe which actions and states along a multi-step sequence are reinforced after a single reward. By focusing our analysis on those states for which RL with and without eligibility trace make qualitatively distinct predictions, we find direct behavioral (choice probability) and physiological (pupil dilation) signatures of reinforcement learning with eligibility trace across multiple sensory modalities.
  • Neural codes are binary codes that are used for information processing and representation in the brain. In previous work, we have shown how an algebraic structure, called the {\it neural ring}, can be used to efficiently encode geometric and combinatorial properties of a neural code [1]. In this work, we consider maps between neural codes and the associated homomorphisms of their neural rings. In order to ensure that these maps are meaningful and preserve relevant structure, we find that we need additional constraints on the ring homomorphisms. This motivates us to define {\it neural ring homomorphisms}. Our main results characterize all code maps corresponding to neural ring homomorphisms as compositions of 5 elementary code maps. As an application, we find that neural ring homomorphisms behave nicely with respect to convexity. In particular, if $\mathcal{C}$ and $\mathcal{D}$ are convex codes, the existence of a surjective code map $\mathcal{C}\rightarrow \mathcal{D}$ with a corresponding neural ring homomorphism implies that the minimal embedding dimensions satisfy $d(\mathcal{D}) \leq d(\mathcal{C})$.
  • We investigate the dynamics of a network consisting of an array of identical cortical units with nearest neighbor interactions under periodic arousal. Each unit consists of two interconnected populations of neurons tuned to a state in which many nonlinear resonances are available. The network is critically balanced due to short-ranged antisymmetric connections between units. For wide ranges of the network parameters, the patterns of activity resemble the dynamics of cellular automata. It is argued that these dynamical states may provide a template in which computation can be implemented.
  • An outstanding problem in neuroscience is to understand how information is integrated across the many modules of the brain. While classic information-theoretic measures have transformed our understanding of feedforward information processing in the brain's sensory periphery, comparable measures for information flow in the massively recurrent networks of the rest of the brain have been lacking. To address this, recent work in information theory has produced a sound measure of network-wide "integrated information," which can be estimated from time-series data. But, a computational hurdle has stymied attempts to measure large-scale information integration in real brains. Specifically, the measurement of integrated information involves a combinatorial search for the informational "weakest link" of a network, a process whose computation time explodes super-exponentially with network size. Here, we show that spectral clustering, applied on the correlation matrix of time-series data, provides an approximate but robust solution to the search for the the informational weakest link of large networks. This reduces the computation time for integrated information in large systems from longer than the lifespan of the universe to just minutes. We evaluate this solution in brain-like systems of coupled oscillators as well as in high-density electrocortigraphy data from two macaque monkeys, and show that the informational "weakest link" of the monkey cortex splits posterior sensory areas from anterior association areas. Finally, we use our solution to provide evidence in support of the long-standing hypothesis that information integration is maximized by networks with a high global efficiency, and that modular network structures promote the segregation of information.
  • We explore the use of neural networks trained with dropout in predicting epileptic seizures from electroencephalographic data (scalp EEG). The input to the neural network is a 126 feature vector containing 9 features for each of the 14 EEG channels obtained over 1-second, non-overlapping windows. The models in our experiments achieved high sensitivity and specificity on patient records not used in the training process. This is demonstrated using leave-one-out-cross-validation across patient records, where we hold out one patient's record as the test set and use all other patients' records for training; repeating this procedure for all patients in the database.
  • We study the power spectrum of a space-time dependent neural field which describes the average membrane potential of neurons in a single layer. This neural field is modelled by a dissipative integro-differential equation, the so-called Amari equation. By considering a small perturbation with respect to a stationary and uniform configuration of the neural field we derive a linearized equation which is solved for a generic external stimulus by using the Fourier transform into wavevector-freqency domain, finding an analytical formula for the power spectrum of the neural field. In addition, after proving that for large wavelengths the linearized Amari equation is equivalent to a diffusion equation which admits space-time dependent analytical solutions, we take into account the nonlinearity of the Amari equation. We find that for large wavelengths a weak nonlinearity in the Amari equation gives rise to a reaction-diffusion equation which can be formally derived from a neural action functional by introducing a dual neural field. For some initial conditions, we discuss analytical solutions of this reaction-diffusion equation.
  • We can potentially make progress on the hard problem of consciousness (Chalmers, 1995), the seemingly intractable problem of explaining how qualia arise from certain physical systems, via the mathematically tractable problem of explaining how objectively unmeasurable aspects (identified with qualia) could arise from certain physical systems that are otherwise objectively measurable. In short, it is proposed that qualia may correspond to non-divergent singularities in the mathematical descriptions of certain aspects of certain complex physical systems. This proposal may have been foreshadowed by Srinivasa Ramanujan. It could have significant implications for the prospects of the experimental verification of consciousness in physical systems and for the prospects of the generation of artificial consciousness (AC).
  • Designing brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) that can be used in conjunction with ongoing motor behavior requires an understanding of how neural activity co-opted for brain control interacts with existing neural circuits. For example, BCIs may be used to regain lost motor function after stroke. This requires that neural activity controlling unaffected limbs is dissociated from activity controlling the BCI. In this study we investigated how primary motor cortex accomplishes simultaneous BCI control and motor control in a task that explicitly required both activities to be driven from the same brain region (i.e. a dual-control task). Single-unit activity was recorded from intracortical, multi-electrode arrays while a non-human primate performed this dual-control task. Compared to activity observed during naturalistic motor control, we found that both units used to drive the BCI directly (control units) and units that did not directly control the BCI (non-control units) significantly changed their tuning to wrist torque. Using a measure of effective connectivity, we observed that control units decrease their connectivity. Through an analysis of variance we found that the intrinsic variability of the control units has a significant effect on task proficiency. When this variance is accounted for, motor cortical activity is flexible enough to perform novel BCI tasks that require active decoupling of natural associations to wrist motion. This study provides insight into the neural activity that enables a dual-control brain-computer interface.
  • In physics, biology and engineering, network systems abound. How does the connectivity of a network system combine with the behavior of its individual components to determine its collective function? We approach this question for networks with linear time-invariant dynamics by relating internal network feedbacks to the statistical prevalence of connectivity motifs, a set of surprisingly simple and local statistics of connectivity. This results in a reduced order model of the network input-output dynamics in terms of motifs structures. As an example, the new formulation dramatically simplifies the classic Erdos-Renyi graph, reducing the overall network behavior to one proportional feedback wrapped around the dynamics of a single node. For general networks, higher-order motifs systematically provide further layers and types of feedback to regulate the network response. Thus, the local connectivity shapes temporal and spectral processing by the network as a whole, and we show how this enables robust, yet tunable, functionality such as extending the time constant with which networks remember past signals. The theory also extends to networks composed from heterogeneous nodes with distinct dynamics and connectivity, and patterned input to (and readout from) subsets of nodes. These statistical descriptions provide a powerful theoretical framework to understand the functionality of real-world network systems, as we illustrate with examples including the mouse brain connectome.
  • Changes in brain states, as found in many neurological diseases such as epilepsy, are often described as bifurcations in mesoscopic neural models. Nearly all of these models rely on a mathematically convenient, but biophysically inaccurate, description of the synaptic input to neurons called current-based synapses. We develop a novel analytical framework to analyze the effects of a more biophysically realistic description, known as conductance-based synapses. These are implemented in a mesoscopic neural model and compared to the standard approximation via a single parameter homotopic mapping. A bifurcation analysis using the homotopy parameter demonstrates that if a more realistic synaptic coupling mechanism is used in this class of models, then a bifurcation or transition to an abnormal brain state does not occur in the same parameter space. We show that the more realistic coupling has additional mathematical parameters that require a fundamentally different biophysical mechanism to undergo a state transition. These results demonstrate the importance of incorporating more realistic synapses in mesoscopic neural models and challenge the accuracy of previous models, especially those describing brain state transitions such as epilepsy.
  • Inspired by applications to theories of coding and communication in networks of nervous tissue, we study maximum entropy distributions on weighted graphs with a given expected degree sequence. These distributions are characterized by independent edge weights parameterized by a shared vector of vertex potentials. Using the general theory of exponential family distributions, we derive the existence and uniqueness of the maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) of the vertex parameters. We also prove consistency of the MLE from a single sample in the limit of large graphs, extending results of Chatterjee, Diaconis, and Sly in the unweighted case (the "beta-model" in statistics). Interestingly, our proofs require tight estimates on the norms of inverses of symmetric, diagonally dominant positive matrices. Along the way, we derive analogues of the Erdos-Gallai criterion of graphical degree sequences for weighted graphs.
  • Human visual object recognition is typically rapid and seemingly effortless, as well as largely independent of viewpoint and object orientation. Until very recently, animate visual systems were the only ones capable of this remarkable computational feat. This has changed with the rise of a class of computer vision algorithms called deep neural networks (DNNs) that achieve human-level classification performance on object recognition tasks. Furthermore, a growing number of studies report similarities in the way DNNs and the human visual system process objects, suggesting that current DNNs may be good models of human visual object recognition. Yet there clearly exist important architectural and processing differences between state-of-the-art DNNs and the primate visual system. The potential behavioural consequences of these differences are not well understood. We aim to address this issue by comparing human and DNN generalisation abilities towards image degradations. We find the human visual system to be more robust to image manipulations like contrast reduction, additive noise or novel eidolon-distortions. In addition, we find progressively diverging classification error-patterns between humans and DNNs when the signal gets weaker, indicating that there may still be marked differences in the way humans and current DNNs perform visual object recognition. We envision that our findings as well as our carefully measured and freely available behavioural datasets provide a new useful benchmark for the computer vision community to improve the robustness of DNNs and a motivation for neuroscientists to search for mechanisms in the brain that could facilitate this robustness.
  • We construct a complexity-based morphospace to study systems-level properties of conscious & intelligent systems. The axes of this space label 3 complexity types: autonomous, cognitive & social. Given recent proposals to synthesize consciousness, a generic complexity-based conceptualization provides a useful framework for identifying defining features of conscious & synthetic systems. Based on current clinical scales of consciousness that measure cognitive awareness and wakefulness, we take a perspective on how contemporary artificially intelligent machines & synthetically engineered life forms measure on these scales. It turns out that awareness & wakefulness can be associated to computational & autonomous complexity respectively. Subsequently, building on insights from cognitive robotics, we examine the function that consciousness serves, & argue the role of consciousness as an evolutionary game-theoretic strategy. This makes the case for a third type of complexity for describing consciousness: social complexity. Having identified these complexity types, allows for a representation of both, biological & synthetic systems in a common morphospace. A consequence of this classification is a taxonomy of possible conscious machines. We identify four types of consciousness, based on embodiment: (i) biological consciousness, (ii) synthetic consciousness, (iii) group consciousness (resulting from group interactions), & (iv) simulated consciousness (embodied by virtual agents within a simulated reality). This taxonomy helps in the investigation of comparative signatures of consciousness across domains, in order to highlight design principles necessary to engineer conscious machines. This is particularly relevant in the light of recent developments at the crossroads of cognitive neuroscience, biomedical engineering, artificial intelligence & biomimetics.
  • Scene viewing is used to study attentional selection in complex but still controlled environments. One of the main observations on eye movements during scene viewing is the inhomogeneous distribution of fixation locations: While some parts of an image are fixated by almost all observers and are inspected repeatedly by the same observer, other image parts remain unfixated by observers even after long exploration intervals. Here, we apply spatial point process methods to investigate the relationship between pairs of fixations. More precisely, we use the pair correlation function (PCF), a powerful statistical tool, to evaluate dependencies between fixation locations along individual scanpaths. We demonstrate that aggregation of fixation locations within four degrees is stronger than expected from chance. Furthermore, the PCF reveals stronger aggregation of fixations when the same image is presented a second time. We use simulations of a dynamical model to show that a narrower spatial attentional span may explain differences in pair correlations between the first and the second inspection of the same image.
  • We present a continuous model for structural brain connectivity based on the Poisson point process. The model treats each streamline curve in a tractography as an observed event in connectome space, here a product space of cortical white matter boundaries. We approximate the model parameter via kernel density estimation. To deal with the heavy computational burden, we develop a fast parameter estimation method by pre-computing associated Legendre products of the data, leveraging properties of the spherical heat kernel. We show how our approach can be used to assess the quality of cortical parcellations with respect to connectivty. We further present empirical results that suggest the discrete connectomes derived from our model have substantially higher test-retest reliability compared to standard methods.
  • Sensory stimuli can be recognized more rapidly when they are expected. This phenomenon depends on expectation affecting the cortical processing of sensory information. However, virtually nothing is known on the mechanisms responsible for the effects of expectation on sensory networks. Here, we report a novel computational mechanism underlying the expectation-dependent acceleration of coding observed in the gustatory cortex (GC) of alert rats. We use a recurrent spiking network model with a clustered architecture capturing essential features of cortical activity, including the metastable activity observed in GC before and after gustatory stimulation. Relying both on network theory and computer simulations, we propose that expectation exerts its function by modulating the intrinsically generated dynamics preceding taste delivery. Our model, whose predictions are confirmed in the experimental data, demonstrates how the modulation of intrinsic metastable activity can shape sensory coding and mediate cognitive processes such as the expectation of relevant events. Altogether, these results provide a biologically plausible theory of expectation and ascribe a new functional role to intrinsically generated, metastable activity.
  • Human learners are adept at grasping the complex relationships underlying incoming sequential input. In the present work, we formalize complex relationships as graph structures derived from temporal associations in motor sequences. Next, we explore the extent to which learners are sensitive to key variations in the topological properties inherent to those graph structures. Participants performed a probabilistic motor sequence task in which the order of button presses was determined by the traversal of graphs with modular, lattice-like, or random organization. Graph nodes each represented a unique button press and edges represented a transition between button presses. Results indicate that learning, indexed here by participants' response times, was strongly mediated by the graph's meso-scale organization, with modular graphs being associated with shorter response times than random and lattice graphs. Moreover, variations in a node's number of connections (degree) and a node's role in mediating long-distance communication (betweenness centrality) impacted graph learning, even after accounting for level of practice on that node. These results demonstrate that the graph architecture underlying temporal sequences of stimuli fundamentally constrains learning, and moreover that tools from network science provide a valuable framework for assessing how learners encode complex, temporally structured information.
  • Regularization occurs when the output a learner produces is less variable than the linguistic data they observed. In an artificial language learning experiment, we show that there exist at least two independent sources of regularization bias in cognition: a domain-general source based on cognitive load and a domain-specific source triggered by linguistic stimuli. Both of these factors modulate how frequency information is encoded and produced, but only the production-side modulations result in regularization (i.e. cause learners to eliminate variation from the observed input). We formalize the definition of regularization as the reduction of entropy and find that entropy measures are better at identifying regularization behavior than frequency-based analyses. Using our experimental data and a model of cultural transmission, we generate predictions for the amount of regularity that would develop in each experimental condition if the artificial language were transmitted over several generations of learners. Here we find that the effect of cognitive constraints can become more complex when put into the context of cultural evolution: although learning biases certainly carry information about the course of language evolution, we should not expect a one-to-one correspondence between the micro-level processes that regularize linguistic datasets and the macro-level evolution of linguistic regularity.
  • Information needs to be appropriately encoded to be reliably transmitted over physical media. Similarly, neurons have their own codes to convey information in the brain. Even though it is well-known that neurons exchange information using a pool of several protocols of spatio-temporal encodings, the suitability of each code and their performance as a function of network parameters and external stimuli is still one of the great mysteries in neuroscience. This paper sheds light on this by modeling small-size networks of chemically and electrically coupled Hindmarsh-Rose spiking neurons. We focus on a class of temporal and firing-rate codes that result from neurons' membrane-potentials and phases, and quantify numerically their performance estimating the Mutual Information Rate, aka the rate of information exchange. Our results suggest that the firing-rate and interspike-intervals codes are more robust to additive Gaussian white noise. In a network of four interconnected neurons and in the absence of such noise, pairs of neurons that have the largest rate of information exchange using the interspike-intervals and firing-rate codes are not adjacent in the network, whereas spike-timings and phase codes (temporal) promote large rate of information exchange for adjacent neurons. If that result would have been possible to extend to larger neural networks, it would suggest that small microcircuits would preferably exchange information using temporal codes (spike-timings and phase codes), whereas on the macroscopic scale, where there would be typically pairs of neurons not directly connected due to the brain's sparsity, firing-rate and interspike-intervals codes would be the most efficient codes.