• Up to now information and information process have no scientific definitions, neither implicit origin. They emerge in observing multiple impulses interactive yes-no actions modeling information Bits. Merging action and reaction, joining probabilistic prior and posterior actions on edge of the observed predictability, begin a microprocess. Its time of entanglement starts space interval composing two qubits or Bit of reversible logic in the emerging information process. The impulse interacting action curves impulse geometry creating asymmetrical logic Bit as logical Maxwell demon. With approaching probability one, the attracting interaction captures energy memorizing asymmetrical logic in information certain Bit. Such Bit is naturally extracted at minimal quality energy equivalent ln2 working as Maxwell Demon. The memorized impulse Bit and its free information self-organizes multiple Bits in triplets composing a macroprocess. Each memorized information binds reversible microprocess with irreversible information macroprocess along multi-dimensional observing process. The macroprocess self-forming triplet units attract new UP through free Information. Multiple UP adjoin hierarchical network (IN) whose free information produces new UP at higher level node and encodes triplets in multi-levels hierarchical organization. The interactive information dynamics assemble geometrical and information structures of cognition and intelligence in double spiral rotating code. The Information path functional integrates in bits the interactive dynamics.
  • Finding observing path creating its observer is important problem in physics and information science. In observing processes, each observation is act changing the observing process that generates interactive observation. Each interaction is discrete Yes-No impulse modeling Bit. Recurring inter-actions independent of physical nature is phenomenon of information. Multiple interactions generate random Markov chains covering multiple Bits. Impulse No action cuts maximum entropy-uncertainty, Yes action transfers cut minimum to next impulse creating maximin principle decreasing uncertainty. The cutoff entropies reveal hidden information naturally observing interactive impulse as elementary observer. Conversion impulse entropies to information integrates path functional. The maxmin variation principle formalizes interactive information equations. Merging Yes-No actions generate microprocess within bordered impulses running superposition of conjugated entropies entangling during time interval within forming space intervals. Interaction curves impulse geometry creating asymmetry which logically erases entangled entropy removing causal probabilistic entropy with symmetrical reversible logic and bringing asymmetrical information logic. Entropy-information topological gap connects asymmetrical logic with physical Markov diffusion whose energy memorizes logical Bit. Moving Bits selfform unit of information macroprocess attracting new UP through free Information. Multiple UP triples adjoin hierarchical network (IN) whose free information produces new UP at higher level node and encodes triple code logic. Each UP unique position in IN hierarchy defines location of each code logical structure. The IN node hierarchical level classifies quality of assembled Information. Ending IN node enfolds all IN levels. Multiple INs enclose Observer cognition and intelligence with consciousness.
  • Understanding the mechanisms responsible for the emergence and evolution of oscillations in traffic flow has been subject to intensive research by the traffic flow theory community. In our previous work, we proposed a new mechanism to explain the generation of traffic oscillations: traffic instability caused by the competition between speed adaptation and the cumulative effect of stochastic factors. In this paper, by conducting a closer examination of car following data obtained in a 25-car platoon experiment, we discovered that the speed difference plays a more important role on car-following dynamics than the spacing, and when its amplitude is small, the growth of oscillations is mainly determined by the stochastic factors that follow the mean reversion process; when its amplitude increases, the growth of the oscillations is determined by the competition between the stochastic factors and the speed difference. An explanation is then provided, based on the above findings, to why the speed variance in the oscillatory traffic grows in a concave way along the platoon. Finally, we proposed a mode-switching stochastic car-following model that incorporates the speed adaptation and spacing indifference behaviors of drivers, which captures the observed characteristics of oscillation and discharge rate. Sensitivity analysis shows that reaction delay only has slight effect but indifference region boundary has significant on oscillation growth rate and discharge rate.
  • An imperative condition for the functioning of a power-grid network is that its power generators remain synchronized. Disturbances can prompt desynchronization, which is a process that has been involved in large power outages. Here we derive a condition under which the desired synchronous state of a power grid is stable, and use this condition to identify tunable parameters of the generators that are determinants of spontaneous synchronization. Our analysis gives rise to an approach to specify parameter assignments that can enhance synchronization of any given network, which we demonstrate for a selection of both test systems and real power grids. Because our results concern spontaneous synchronization, they are relevant both for reducing dependence on conventional control devices, thus offering an additional layer of protection given that most power outages involve equipment or operational errors, and for contributing to the development of "smart grids" that can recover from failures in real time.
  • To well understand crowd behavior, microscopic models have been developed in recent decades, in which an individual's behavioral/psychological status can be modeled and simulated. A well-known model is the social-force model innovated by physical scientists (Helbing and Molnar, 1995; Helbing, Farkas and Vicsek, 2000; Helbing et al., 2002). This model has been widely accepted and mainly used in simulation of crowd evacuation in the past decade. A problem, however, is that the testing results of the model were not explained in consistency with the psychological findings, resulting in misunderstanding of the model by psychologists. This paper will bridge the gap between psychological studies and physical explanation about this model. We reinterpret this physics-based model from a psychological perspective, clarifying that the model is consistent with psychological theories on stress, including time-related stress and interpersonal stress. Based on the conception of stress, we renew the model at both micro-and-macro level, referring to multi-agent simulation in a microscopic sense and fluid-based analysis in a macroscopic sense. The cognition and behavior of individual agents are critically modeled as response to environmental stimuli. Existing simulation results such as faster-is-slower effect will be reinterpreted by Yerkes-Dodson law, and herding and grouping effect are further discussed by integrating attraction into the social force. In brief the social-force model exhibits a bridge between the physics laws and psychological principles regarding crowd motion, and this paper will renew and reinterpret the model on the foundation of psychological studies.
  • The spread of opinions, memes, diseases, and "alternative facts" in a population depends both on the details of the spreading process and on the structure of the social and communication networks on which they spread. In this paper, we explore how \textit{anti-establishment} nodes (e.g., \textit{hipsters}) influence the spreading dynamics of two competing products. We consider a model in which spreading follows a deterministic rule for updating node states (which describe which product has been adopted) in which an adjustable fraction $p_{\rm Hip}$ of the nodes in a network are hipsters, who choose to adopt the product that they believe is the less popular of the two. The remaining nodes are conformists, who choose which product to adopt by considering which products their immediate neighbors have adopted. We simulate our model on both synthetic and real networks, and we show that the hipsters have a major effect on the final fraction of people who adopt each product: even when only one of the two products exists at the beginning of the simulations, a very small fraction of hipsters in a network can still cause the other product to eventually become the more popular one. To account for this behavior, we construct an approximation for the steady-state adoption fraction on $k$-regular trees in the limit of few hipsters. Additionally, our simulations demonstrate that a time delay $\tau$ in the knowledge of the product distribution in a population, as compared to immediate knowledge of product adoption among nearest neighbors, can have a large effect on the final distribution of product adoptions. Our simple model and analysis may help shed light on the road to success for anti-establishment choices in elections, as such success can arise rather generically in our model from a small number of anti-establishment individuals and ordinary processes of social influence on normal individuals.
  • We represent the functioning of the housing market and study the relation between income segregation, income inequality and house prices by introducing a spatial Agent-Based Model (ABM). Differently from traditional models in urban economics, we explicitly specify the behavior of buyers and sellers and the price formation mechanism. Buyers who differ by income select among heterogeneous neighborhoods using a probabilistic model of residential choice; sellers employ an aspiration level heuristic to set their reservation offer price; prices are determined through a continuous double auction. We first provide an approximate analytical solution of the ABM, shedding light on the structure of the model and on the effect of the parameters. We then simulate the ABM and find that: (i) a more unequal income distribution lowers the prices globally, but implies stronger segregation; (ii) a spike of the demand in one part of the city increases the prices all over the city; (iii) subsidies are more efficient than taxes in fostering social mixing.
  • We explore a new mechanism to explain polarization phenomena in opinion dynamics in which agents evaluate alternative views on the basis of the social feedback obtained on expressing them. High support of the favored opinion in the social environment, is treated as a positive feedback which reinforces the value associated to this opinion. In connected networks of sufficiently high modularity, different groups of agents can form strong convictions of competing opinions. Linking the social feedback process to standard equilibrium concepts we analytically characterize sufficient conditions for the stability of bi-polarization. While previous models have emphasized the polarization effects of deliberative argument-based communication, our model highlights an affective experience-based route to polarization, without assumptions about negative influence or bounded confidence.
  • The synchronization of self-propelled particles (SPPs) is a fascinating instance of emergent behavior in living and man-made systems, such as colonies of bacteria, flocks of birds, robot ensembles, and many others. The recent discovery of chimera states in coupled oscillators opens up new perspectives and indicates that other emergent behaviors may exist for SPPs. Indeed, for a minimal extension of the classical Vicsek model we show the existence of chimera states for SPPs, i.e., one group of particles synchronizes while others wander around chaotically. Compared to chimeras in coupled oscillators where the site position is fixed, SPPs give rise to new distinctive forms of chimeric behavior. We emphasize that the found behavior is directly implied by the structure of the deterministic equation of motion and is not caused by exogenous stochastic excitation. In the scaling limit of infinitely many particles, we show that the chimeric state persists. Our findings provide the starting point for the search or elicitation of chimeric states in real world SPP systems.
  • Gene regulatory network (GRN)-based morphogenetic models have recently gained an increasing attention. However, the relationship between microscopic properties of intracellular GRNs and macroscopic properties of morphogenetic systems has not been fully understood yet. Here we propose a theoretical morphogenetic model representing an aggregation of cells, and reveal the relationship between criticality of GRNs and morphogenetic pattern formation. In our model, the positions of the cells are determined by spring-mass-damper kinetics. Each cell has an identical Kauffman's $NK$ random Boolean network (RBN) as its GRN. We varied the properties of GRNs from ordered, through critical, to chaotic by adjusting node in-degree $K$. We randomly assigned four cell fates to the attractors of RBNs for cellular behaviors. By comparing diverse morphologies generated in our morphogenetic systems, we investigated what the role of the criticality of GRNs is in forming morphologies. We found that nontrivial spatial patterns were generated most frequently when GRNs were at criticality. Our finding indicates that the criticality of GRNs facilitates the formation of nontrivial morphologies in GRN-based morphogenetic systems.
  • This study deals with the evolution of the so called 'intelligent' networks (insect society without leader, cells of an organism, brain,...) during their learning period. First we summarize briefly the Version 2 (published in French), whose the main characteristics are: 1) A network connected to its environment is considered as immersed into an information field created by this environment which so dictates to it the learning constraints. 2) The used formalism draws one's inspiration from the one of the Quantum field theory (Principle of stationary action, gauge fields, invariance by symmetry transformations,...). 3) We obtain Lagrange equations whose solutions describe the network evolution during the whole learning period. 4) Then, while proceeding with the same formalism inspiration, we suggest other study ways capable of evolving the knowledge in the considered scope. In a second part, after a reminder of the points to be improved, we exhibit the Version 5 which brings, we think, relevant improvements. Indeed: 5) We consider the weighted averages of the variables; this introduces probabilities. 6) We define two observables (L average of information flux and A activity of the network) which could be measured and so be compared with experimental results. 7) We find that L , weighted average of information flows, is an invariant. 8) Finally, we propose two expressions for the conactance, from which we deduce the corresponding Lagrange equations which have to be solved to know the evolution of the considered weighted averages. But, at the present stage, we think that we can progress only by carrying out experiments (see projects like Human brain project) and discovering invariants, symmetries which would allow us, like in Physics, to classify networks and above all to understand better the connections between them. Indeed, and that is what we propose among the future research ways, the underlying problem is to understand how, after their learning period, several networks can connect together to produce, in the brain case for instance, what we call mental states.
  • This work aimed, to determine the characteristics of activity series from fractal geometry concepts application, in addition to evaluate the possibility of identifying individuals with fibromyalgia. Activity level data were collected from 27 healthy subjects and 27 fibromyalgia patients, with the use of clock-like devices equipped with accelerometers, for about four weeks, all day long. The activity series were evaluated through fractal and multifractal methods. Hurst exponent analysis exhibited values according to other studies ($H>0.5$) for both groups ($H=0.98\pm0.04$ for healthy subjects and $H=0.97\pm0.03$ for fibromyalgia patients), however, it is not possible to distinguish between the two groups by such analysis. Activity time series also exhibited a multifractal pattern. A paired analysis of the spectra indices for the sleep and awake states revealed differences between healthy subjects and fibromyalgia patients. The individuals feature differences between awake and sleep states, having statistically significant differences for $\alpha_{q-} - \alpha_{0}$ in healthy subjects ($p = 0.014$) and $D_{0}$ for patients with fibromyalgia ($p = 0.013$). The approach has proven to be an option on the characterisation of such kind of signals and was able to differ between both healthy and fibromyalgia groups. This outcome suggests changes in the physiologic mechanisms of movement control.
  • The self-oscillatory dynamics is considered as motion of a particle in a potential field in the presence of dissipation. Described mechanism of self-oscillation excitation is not associated with peculiarities of a dissipation function, but results from properties of a potential, whose shape depends on a system state. Moreover, features of a potential function allow to realize the self-oscillation excitation in a case of the dissipation function being positive at each point of the phase space. The phenomenon is explored both numerically and experimentally on the example of a double-well oscillator with a state-dependent potential and dissipation. After that a simplified single-well model is studied.
  • Game theory is widely used as a behavioral model for strategic interactions in biology and social science. It is common practice to assume that players quickly converge to an equilibrium, e.g. a Nash equilibrium. This can be studied in terms of best reply dynamics, in which each player myopically uses the best response to her opponent's last move. Existing research shows that convergence can be problematic when there are best reply cycles. Here we calculate how typical this is by studying the space of all possible two-player normal form games and counting the frequency of best reply cycles. The two key parameters are the number of moves, which defines how complicated the game is, and the anti-correlation of the payoffs, which determines how competitive it is. We find that as games get more complicated and more competitive, best reply cycles become dominant. The existence of best reply cycles predicts non-convergence of six different learning algorithms that have support from human experiments. Our results imply that for complicated and competitive games equilibrium is typically an unrealistic assumption. Alternatively, if for some reason "real" games are special and do not possess cycles, we raise the interesting question of why this should be so.
  • We introduce a model called Host-Pathogen game for studying biological competitions. Notably, we focus on the invasive dynamics of external agents, like bacteria, within a host organism. The former are mapped to a population of defectors that aim to spread in the extracellular medium of the host. In turn, the latter is composed of cells, mapped to a population of cooperators, that aim to kill pathogens. The cooperative behavior of cells is fundamental for the emergence of the living functions of the whole organism, since each one contributes to a specific set of tasks. So, broadly speaking, their contribution can be viewed as a form of energy. When bacteria are spatially close to a cell, the latter can use a fraction of its energy to remove them. On the other hand, when bacteria survive an attack, they absorb the received energy, becoming stronger and more resistant to further attacks. In addition, since bacteria play as defectors, their unique target is to increase their wealth, without supporting their own kind. As in many living organisms, the host temperature plays a relevant role in the host-pathogen equilibrium. For instance, in animals like human beings, a neural mechanism triggers the increasing of the body temperature in order to activate the immune system. Here, cooperators succeed once bacteria are completely removed while, in the opposite scenario, the host undergoes a deep invasive process, like a blood poisoning. Results of numerical simulations show that the dynamics of the proposed model allow to reach a variety of states. At a very high level of abstraction, some of these states seem to be similar to those that can be observed in some living systems. Therefore, to conclude, we deem that our model might be exploited for studying further biological phenomena.
  • Experimental study on noise-induced synchronization of crystal oscillators is presented. Two types of circuits were constructed: one consists of two Pierce oscillators that were isolated from each other and received a common noise input, while the other is based on a single Pierce oscillator that received a same sequence of noise signal repeatedly. Due to frequency detuning between the two Pierce oscillators, the first circuit showed no clear sign of noise-induced synchronization. The second circuit, on the other hand, generated coherent waveforms between different trials of the same noise injection. The waveform coherence was, however, broken immediately after the noise injection was terminated. Stronger modulation such as the voltage resetting was finally shown to be effective to induce phase shifts, leading to phase-synchronization of the Pierce oscillator. Our study presents a guideline for synchronizing clocks of multiple CPU systems, distributed sensor networks, and other engineering devices.
  • Many problems in industry --- and in the social, natural, information, and medical sciences --- involve discrete data and benefit from approaches from subjects such as network science, information theory, optimization, probability, and statistics. The study of networks is concerned explicitly with connectivity between different entities, and it has become very prominent in industrial settings, an importance that has intensified amidst the modern data deluge. In this commentary, we discuss the role of network analysis in industrial and applied mathematics, and we give several examples of network science in industry. We focus, in particular, on discussing a physical-applied-mathematics approach to the study of networks. We also discuss several of our own collaborations with industry on projects in network analysis.
  • The motion of social insects is often used a paradigmatic example of complex adaptive dynamics arising from decentralized individual behavior. In this paper we revisit the topic of the ruling laws behind burst of activity in ants. The analysis, done over previously reported data, reconsider the causation arrows, proposed at individual level, not finding any link between the duration of the ants' activity and its moving speed. Secondly, synthetic trajectories created from steps of different ants, demonstrate that a Markov process can explain the previously reported speed shape profile. Finally we show that as more ants enter the nest, the faster they move, which implies a collective property. Overall these results provides a mechanistic explanation for the reported behavioral laws, and suggest a formal way to further study the collective properties in these scenarios.
  • We model the formation of multi-layer transportation networks as a multi-objective optimization process, where service providers compete for passengers, and the creation of routes is determined by a multi-objective cost function encoding a trade-off between efficiency and competition. The resulting model reproduces well real-world systems as diverse as airplane, train and bus networks, thus suggesting that such systems are indeed compatible with the proposed local optimization mechanisms. In the specific case of airline transportation systems, we show that the networks of routes operated by each company are placed very close to the theoretical Pareto front in the efficiency-competition plane, and that most of the largest carriers of a continent belong to the corresponding Pareto front. Our results shed light on the fundamental role played by multi-objective optimization principles in shaping the structure of large-scale multilayer transportation systems, and provide novel insights to service providers on the strategies for the smart selection of novel routes.
  • Synchronization is a universal phenomenon, seen in systems as diverse as superconducting Josephson junctions and discharging pacemaker cells. Here the elements have rhythmic state variables whose mutual influence promotes temporal order. A parallel form of order is seen in swarming systems, such as schools of fish or flocks of birds. Now the degrees of freedom are the individuals' positions, which get redistributed through interactions to form spatial structures. Systems capable of both swarming and synchronizing, dubbed swarmalators, have recently been proposed [O'Keeffe, Kevin P., and Steven H. Strogatz. "Swarmalators: Oscillators that sync and swarm." arXiv preprint arXiv:1701.05670 (2017)] and analyzed in the continuum limit. Here we extend this work by studying finite populations of swarmalators, whose phase similarity affects both their spatial attraction and repulsion. We find ring states, and compute criteria for their existence and stability. Larger populations can form annular distributions, whose density and inner and outer radii we calculate explicitly. These states may be observable in groups of Japanese tree frogs, magnetic colloids, and other systems with an interplay between swarming and synchronization.
  • We have previously presented a critique of the standard Marshallian theory of the firm, and developed an alternative formulation that better agreed with the results of simulation. An incorrect mathematical fact was used in our previous presentation. This paper deals with correcting the derivation of the Keen equilibrium, and generalising the result to the asymmetric case. As well, we discuss the notion of rationality employed, and how this plays out in a two player version of the game.
  • Cooperation is a persistent behavioral pattern of entities pooling and sharing resources. Its ubiquity in nature poses a conundrum. Whenever two entities cooperate, one must willingly relinquish something of value to the other. Why is this apparent altruism favored in evolution? Classical solutions assume a net fitness gain in a cooperative transaction which, through reciprocity or relatedness, finds its way back from recipient to donor. We seek the source of this fitness gain. Our analysis rests on the insight that evolutionary processes are typically multiplicative and noisy. Fluctuations have a net negative effect on the long-time growth rate of resources but no effect on the growth rate of their expectation value. This is an example of non-ergodicity. By reducing the amplitude of fluctuations, pooling and sharing increases the long-time growth rate for cooperating entities, meaning that cooperators outgrow similar non-cooperators. We identify this increase in growth rate as the net fitness gain, consistent with the concept of geometric mean fitness in the biological literature. This constitutes a fundamental mechanism for the evolution of cooperation. Its minimal assumptions make it a candidate explanation of cooperation in settings too simple for other fitness gains, such as emergent function and specialization, to be probable. One such example is the transition from single cells to early multicellular life.
  • Spontaneous cortical population activity exhibits a multitude of oscillatory patterns, which often display synchrony during slow-wave sleep or under certain anesthetics and stay asynchronous during quiet wakefulness. The mechanisms behind these cortical states and transitions among them are not completely understood. Here we study spontaneous population activity patterns in random networks of spiking neurons of mixed types modeled by Izhikevich equations. Neurons are coupled by conductance-based synapses subject to synaptic noise. We localize the population activity patterns on the parameter diagram spanned by the relative inhibitory synaptic strength and the magnitude of synaptic noise. In absence of noise, networks display transient activity patterns, either oscillatory or at constant level. The effect of noise is to turn transient patterns into persistent ones: for weak noise, all activity patterns are asynchronous non-oscillatory independently of synaptic strengths; for stronger noise, patterns have oscillatory and synchrony characteristics that depend on the relative inhibitory synaptic strength. In the region of parameter space where inhibitory synaptic strength exceeds the excitatory synaptic strength and for moderate noise magnitudes networks feature intermittent switches between oscillatory and quiescent states with characteristics similar to those of synchronous and asynchronous cortical states, respectively. We explain these oscillatory and quiescent patterns by combining a phenomenological global description of the network state with local descriptions of individual neurons in their partial phase spaces. Our results point to a bridge from events at the molecular scale of synapses to the cellular scale of individual neurons to the collective scale of neuronal populations.
  • Many animal groups are heterogeneous and may even consist of individuals of different species, called mixed-species flocks. Mathematical and computational models of collective animal movement behaviour, however, typically assume that groups and populations consist of identical individuals. In this paper, using the mathematical framework of the coagulation-fragmentation process, we develop and analyse a model of merge and split group dynamics, also called fission-fusion dynamics, for heterogeneous populations that contain two types (or species) of individuals. We assume that more heterogeneous groups experience higher split rates than homogeneous groups, forming two daughter groups whose compositions are drawn uniformly from all possible partitions. We analytically derive a master equation for group size and compositions and find mean-field steady-state solutions. We predict that there is a critical group size below which groups are more likely to be homogeneous and contain the abundant type/species. Despite the propensity of heterogeneous groups to split at higher rates, we find that groups are more likely to be heterogeneous but only above the critical group size. Monte-Carlo simulation of the model show excellent agreement with these analytical model results. Thus, our model makes a testable prediction that composition of flocks are group-size dependent and do not merely reflect the population level heterogeneity. We discuss the implications of our results to empirical studies on flocking systems.
  • The theory of cointegration has been a leading theory in econometrics with powerful applications to macroeconomics during the last decades. On the other hand the theory of phase synchronization for weakly coupled complex oscillators has been one of the leading theories in physics for many years with many applications to different areas of science. For example, in neuroscience phase synchronization is regarded as essential for functional coupling of different brain regions. In an abstract sense both theories describe the dynamic fluctuation around some equilibrium. In this paper, we point out that there exists a very close connection between both theories. Apart from phase jumps, a stochastic version of the Kuramoto equations can be approximated by a cointegrated system of difference equations. As one consequence, the rich theory on statistical inference for cointegrated systems can immediately be applied for statistical inference on phase synchronization based on empirical data. This includes tests for phase synchronization, tests for unidirectional coupling and the identification of the equilibrium from data including phase shifts. We study two examples on a unidirectionally coupled R\"ossler-Lorenz system and on electrochemical oscillators. The methods from cointegration may also be used to investigate phase synchronization in complex networks. Conversely, there are many interesting results on phase synchronization which may inspire new research on cointegration.